2. Comparison activity Personal stories Part a – Comparisons



Download 21.17 Kb.
Date conversion19.08.2017
Size21.17 Kb.

rightsED Bringing them home

2. Comparison activity


Personal stories

Part A – Comparisons


Read at least two of the personal stories of Indigenous people who were separated from their families as children. Use the table below to take notes about the details of the stories you have read.

What happened

Story one

Story two

Who separated the children from their family and community?







How were the children separated from their families?







What experiences did the children who were separated from their families have?







How long were the children away from their family?







Did the children express any strong emotions?

If so, when and why?









Did the children have brothers and sisters who were also separated from their families?





What were some of the positive experiences the children had?








What happened to other family members (parents, siblings or children)?








Part B – Group discussion


Working in pairs or a group, compare and contrast the stories you have read in reference to the notes made above.

I) On a sheet of cardboard or butchers paper, divide the page into four sections with the following headings: similarities, differences, common experiences, and long-term effects. Use the questions below to help you work through each of headings.



1. Identify and discuss the main similarities and differences between the stories. Here are some focus questions to guide your discussion:

  • What do the stories have in common?

  • What are the recurring experiences expressed in each story?

  • How are the stories different in terms of:

  • the way children were separated from their families

  • the processes the children went through

  • the experiences of the children who were separated from their families

  • the extent of contact with the childrens’ communities and families.

2. Identify and discuss the common experiences that come out of the stories you have read.

3. Identify and discuss how the removals had long-term effects on those people who were separated from their families.


II) Write the key points of your discussion in the appropriate section on your butchers paper or cardboard.

III) Write one main point about the similarities, differences, common experiences, and long-term effects from each of the stories you have read below.



Similarities




Differences




Common experiences




Long-term effects



Part C – Reflection

Using the information above, write a short paragraph answer to the following questions:

Do you think these personal stories/ histories are a good way of learning about the issue? Why/why not?

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………

How do people’s personal experiences and stories help our understanding of social issues? What can be learned from them?

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………



© Australian Human Rights Commission 2010 | www.humanrights.gov.au/education/bringing_them_home





The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page