2014Final Exam Review, English 9 Texts



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2014Final Exam Review, English 9

Texts


  • There will be no direct questions about any of the

texts that we have read this year; however, there

will be reading selections that are thematically

related to the texts
Be able to:


  • Edit and correct fragments and run-ons




  • Correctly use in text citations for a formal essay and




  • Use MLA format (correct heading, pagination etc…)




  • Correctly cite sources with and without an author(s) in the MLA format




  • Identify the elements of a sonnet and analyze a poem




  • Critically read a given reading passage (possibly a soliloquy from R&J


Be able to identify the following Elements of Fiction (poetry, literature, and drama) for each of the texts we have read this semester:

Plot (parts of the plot)

Conflict Imagery

Foreshadow Classical Allusions

Personification Characters

Theme Metaphor

Symbols Simile

Setting Dialogue

Point of View Personification

Stage Directions Act/Scene




Structure of the Exam:

  • 100 questions

  • All multiple choice/ objective

  • Reading Comprehension

  • NO essay



9 CP 2013 Final Exam Study Guide

Directions: Respond to the following questions.


Elements of Fiction: Literary Terms and Devices

1. A theme is

a. the overall meaning or message of a story.

b. the same as the plot.

c. a descriptive term of a character’s portrayal.

d. the outcome of a story.




  1. The exposition of a story involves the

a. characters.

b. setting.

c. conflict.

d. all of the above




  1. The rising action of a story includes

a. events that makes the conflict obvious.

b. the characters, setting, and background information.

c. the turning point of a story.

d. the outcome of a story.




  1. The climax of a story includes

a. everything leading up to the climax of a story.

b. the characters, setting, and background information.

c. the resolve of the conflict.

d. the outcome of a story.




  1. The falling action includes

a. everything leading up to the climax of a story.

b. the characters, setting, and background information.

c. events that show the effects of the climax.

d. the outcome of a story.




  1. The resolution of a story includes

a. everything leading up to the climax of a story.

b. the characters, setting, and background information.

c. the turning point of a story.

d. the outcome of a story.



  1. A character who does not change much in the course of a story is a

    1. static character.

    2. dynamic character.

    3. flat character.

    4. round character.




  1. A character who changes as the result of the story’s events is
    1. static character.


    2. dynamic character.

    3. flat character.

    4. round character.




  1. Conflict is

a. a problem that the character struggles to resolve.

b. a character whose actions/personality contrast with those of another character.

c. a reference to another literary work.

d. a story that teaches a lesson.




  1. Setting is

a. the time in which the action occurs.

b. the time and place in which the action occurs.

c. the place in which the action occurs.

d. the place where all the characters meet.




  1. A story written in third person would include which of the following?

a. I was walking.

b. You were walking.

c. The girl was walking.

d. My friend was walking.


Part II. Literary and Dramatic Devices

Define eight of the following:
Conflict Metaphor Allusion Imagery

Foreshadow Simile Setting Point of View

Inference Soliloquy Act/Scene Stage Directions

Theme Personification Irony Foil

Symbol Comic Relief Aside Verbal Irony

Dramatic Irony Situational Irony Monologue Mood


12. Device:_____________________

Definition: ______________________________________________________________

13. Device:_____________________

Definition: ______________________________________________________________

14. Device:_____________________

Definition: ______________________________________________________________

15. Device:_____________________

Definition: ______________________________________________________________

16. Device:_____________________

Definition: ______________________________________________________________

17. Device:_____________________

Definition: ______________________________________________________________

18. Device:_____________________

Definition: ______________________________________________________________

19. Device:_____________________

Definition: ______________________________________________________________

Part III. MLA

Respond to the following:

20. What is the measurement of the margins for an essay?

_____________________________________
21. What does the heading consist of, where should it be placed, and how is it spaced?

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________
22. What kind of spacing is used for a typed essay?

______________________________________


23. What goes in the right top corner of every page of an essay? How far from the top of the page?

_______________________________________________________________________


24. When using quotes they should always be followed by ________________________. The period goes at the _______________________ of the sentence, after the _______________ marks.
25. A works cited page should be entirely ___________ spaced. The title or it should be _______________________. The list of sources starts _____________ lines down from the title. Sources are listed in ___________________ order. The second and consecutive lines of a source are to be __________________ .

Part IV. Reading Comprehension
Read the story below and answer the questions that follow:
The Good Provider

by Marion Gross

Minnie Leggety turned up the walk of her Elm Street bungalow and saw that she faced another crisis. When Omar sat brooding like that, not smoking, not “studying,” but just scrunched down inside of himself, she knew enough after forty years to realize that she was facing a crisis. As though it weren’t enough just trying to get along on Omar’s pension these days, without having to baby him through another one of his periods of discouragement! She forced a gaiety into her voice that she actually didn’t feel.

“Why, hello there, Pa, what are you doing out here? Did you have to come up for air?” Minnie eased herself down beside Omar on the stoop and put the paper bag she had been carrying on the sidewalk. Such a little bag, but it had taken most of their week’s food budget! Protein, plenty of lean, rare steaks and chops, that’s what that nice man on the radio said old folks needed, but as long as he couldn’t tell you how to buy it with steak at $1.23 a pound, he might just as well save his breath to cool his porridge. And so might she, for all the attention Omar was paying her. He was staring straight ahead as though he didn’t even see her. This looked like one of his real bad spells. She took his gnarled hand and patted it.

“What’s the matter, Pa? Struck a snag with your gadget?” The “gadget” filled three full walls of the basement and most of the floor space besides, but it was still a “gadget” to Minnie -- another one of his ideas that didn’t quite work.

Omar had been working on gadgets ever since they were married. When they were younger, she hotly sprang to his defense against her sisters-in-law: “Well it’s better than liquor, and it’s cheaper than pinochle: at least I know where he is nights.” Now that they were older, and Omar was retired from his job, his tinkering took on a new significance. It was what kept him from going to pieces like a lot of men who were retired and didn’t have enough activity to fill their time and their minds.

“What’s the matter, Pa?” she asked again.

The old man seemed to notice her for the first time. Sadly he shook his head. “Minnie, I’m a failure. The thing’s no good; it ain’t practical. After all I promised you, Minnie, and the way you stuck by me and all, it’s just not going to work.”

Minnie never had thought it would. It just didn’t seem possible that a body could go gallivanting back and forth the way Pa had said they would if the gadget worked. She continued to pat the hand she held and told him soothingly, “I’m not sure but it’s for the best, Pa. I’d sure have gotten airsick, or timesick, or whatever it was. What’re you going to work on now that you’re giving up the time machine?” She asked anxiously.

“You don’t understand, Min,” the old man said. “I’m through. I’ve failed. I’ve failed at everything I’ve ever tried to make. They always almost work and yet there’s always something I can’t get just right. I never knew enough, Min, never had enough schooling, and now it’s too late to get any. I’m just giving up altogether. I’m through!”

This was serious. Pa with nothing to tinker at down in the basement. Pa constantly underfoot. Pa with nothing to keep him from just slipping like old Mr. Mason had, was something she didn’t like to think about. “Maybe it isn’t as bad as all that,” she told him. “All those nice parts you put into your gadget, maybe you could make us a television or something with them. Land, a television. That would be a nice thing to have.”

“Oh, I couldn’t do that, Min. I wouldn’t know how to make a television; besides, I told you, it almost works. It’s just that it ain’t practical. It ain’t the way I pictured it. Come down. I’ll show you. He dragged her into the house and down into the basement.

The time machine left so little free floor space, what with the furnace and coal bin and washtubs, that Minnie had to stand on the stairway while Pa explained it to her. It needed explanation. It had more colored lights than a pinball machine, more plugs than the Hillsdale telephone exchange, and more levers than one of those newfangled voting booths.

“Now see,” he said, pointing to various parts of the machine. “I rigged this thing up so we could move forward or back in time and space both. I thought we could go off and visit foreign spots, and see great things happening, and have ourselves an interesting old age.”

“Well, I don’t rightly know if I’d have enjoyed that, Pa.” Minnie interrupted. “I doubt I’d know how to get along with all them foreigners, and their strange talk and strange ways and all.”

Omar shook his head in annoyance. “The Holy Land. You’d have wanted to see the Holy Land, wouldn’t you? You could have sat with the crowd at Galilee and listened to the Lord’s words right from His lips. You’d have enjoyed that, wouldn’t you?”

“Omar, when you talk like that you make the whole thing sound sacrilegious and against the Lord’s ways. Besides, I suppose the Lord would have spoke in Hebrew, and I don’t know one word of that and you don’t either. I don’t know but what I’m glad you couldn’t get the thing to work,” she said righteously.

“But Min, it does work!” Omar was indignant.

“But you said --”

“I never said it don’t work. I said it ain’t practical. It don’t work good enough, and I don’t know enough to make it work better.”

Working on the gadget was one thing, but believing that it worked was another. Minnie began to be alarmed. Maybe folks had been right -- maybe Omar had gone off his head at last. She looked at him anxiously. He seemed all right and, now that he was worked up at her, the depression seemed to have left him.

“What do you mean it works, but not good enough?” she asked him.

“Well, see here.” Omar told her, pointing to an elaborate control board. “It was like I was telling you before you interrupted with your not getting along with foreigners, and your sacreligion and all. I set this thing up to move a body in time and space any which way. There’s a globe of the world worked in here, and I thought that by turning the globe and setting these time controls to whatever year you had in mind you could go wherever you had a mind to. Well, it don’t work like that. I’ve been trying it out for a whole week and no matter how I set the globe, no matter how I set the time controls, it always comes out the same. It lands me over at Main and Center, right in front of Purdey’s meat market.”

“What’s wrong with that?” Minnie asked. “That might be real convenient.”

“You don’t understand.” Omar told her. “It isn’t now when I get there, it’s twenty years ago! That’s the trouble, it don’t take me none of the places I want to go, just Main and Center. And it don’t take me none of the times I want to go, just twenty years ago, and I saw enough of the Depression so I don’t want to spend my old age watching people sell apples. Then on top of that, this here timer don’t work.” He pointed to another dial. “It’s supposed to set to how long you want to stay, wherever you want to go, but it don’t work at all. Twenty minutes, and then woosh, you’re right back here in the basement. Nothing works like I want it to.”

Minnie had grown thoughtful as Omar recounted the faults of the machine. Wasn’t it a caution the way even a smart man like Pa, a man smart enough to make a time machine, didn’t have a practical ounce to his whole hundred and forty-eight pounds? She sat down heavily on the cellar steps and, emptying the contents of her purse on her broad lap, began examining the bills.


“What you looking for, Min?” Omar asked. Minnie looked at him pityingly. Wasn’t it a caution . . .

Purdey the butcher was leaning unhappily against his chopping block. The shop was clean and shining, the floor was strewn with fresh sawdust, and Purdey himself, unmindful of the expense, had for the sake of his morale donned a fresh apron. But for all that, Purdey wished that he was hanging on one of his chromium-lated meat hooks.

The sky was blue and smogless, something it never was when the shops were operating and employing the valley’s five thousand breadwinners. Such potential customers as were abroad had a shabby, threadbare look to them. Over in front of the Bijou old Mr. Ryan was selling apples.

While he watched, a stout, determined-looking woman appeared at the corner of Main and Center. She glanced quickly around, brushing old Mr. Ryan and his apples with her glance, and then came briskly toward Purdey’s shop. Purdey straightened up.

“Afternoon, Ma’am. What can I do for you?” He beamed as though the light bill weren’t three months overdue.

“I’ll have a nice porterhouse,” the lady said hesitantly. “How much is porterhouse?”

“Forty-five a pound, best in the house.” Purdy held up a beauty, expecting her to change her mind.

“I’ll take it,” the lady said. “And six lamb chops. I want a rib roast for Sunday, but I can come back for that. No use carrying too much,” she explained. “Could you please hurry with that? I haven’t very much time.”

“New in town?” Purdey asked as he turned to ring up the sale on the cash register.

“Yes, you might say so,” the woman said. By the time Purdey turned back to ask her name she was gone. But Purdey knew she’d be back. She wanted a rib roast for Sunday. “It just goes to show you,” Purdey said to himself, surveying the satisfactory tab sticking up from the register. “there still is some money around. Two dollars and she never even batted an eyelash. It goes to show you!”

26. Minnie Leggety knows she faces a crisis when Omar sits

a. smoking.

b. talking.

c. brooding.

d. playing cards.

27. At the beginning of the story, Minnie has been

a. visiting with friends.

b. buying meat.

c. riding the bus.

d. phoning the doctor.

28. Omar’s “gadget” occupies most of

a. the basement.

b. the attic.

c. the living room.

d. the garage.


29. Minnie

a. is opposed to Omar’s hobby.

b. is in favor of his hobby.

c. doesn’t care what her husband does.

d. doesn’t know Omar has a hobby.
30. Omar’s time machine can send a person to

a. The Holy Land.

b. Main and Center.

c. Ancient Rome.

d. Classical Greece.
31. The machine can transport a person back in time

a. 500 years.

b. 50 years.

c. 20 years.

d. 10 years.
32. Minnie uses the time machine

a. to travel to the Holy Land.

b. to visit relatives.

c. to shop in Paris.

d. to buy meat.

33. When the narrator says, “Minnie had grown thoughtful” and “Minnie looked at him pityingly,” the reader can infer that she

a. feels her life has been wasted

b. is trying to think of a new hobby for Omar.

c. is planning to find a part-time job.

d. is planning to get to Purdy’s meat market in the time machine.


34. The point of view of the story is

a. first person.

b. second person.

c. third person.

d. outsider.
Part V. Elements of Poetry: Literary Terms and Devices

35. Form is

a. a unit of verse that appears without being broken.

b. a grouping of lines, equivalent to a paragraph in prose.

c. the way a poem looks and is arranged on the page.

d. verse that does not conform to any fixed meter or rhyme scheme.

36. Line is

a. a unit of verse that appears without being broken.

b. a grouping of lines, equivalent to a paragraph in prose.

c. the way a poem looks and is arranged on the page.

d. verse that does not conform to any fixed meter or rhyme scheme.
37. Stanza is

a. a unit of verse that appears without being broken.

b. a grouping of lines, equivalent to a paragraph in prose.

c. the way a poem looks and is arranged on the page.

d. verse that does not conform to any fixed meter or rhyme scheme.
38. A metaphor is

a. a comparison between two seemingly unlike things using “like” or “as.”

b. a comparison between two seemingly unlike things NOT using “like” or

“as.”


c. giving human characteristics to inhuman things.

d. a story that teaches a lesson.


39. Tone is

    1. the language that conveys meaning beyond the literal meaning.

b. the feeling that the writer wants the reader to get.

  1. reflects the writer’s attitude toward his or her subject.

  2. the form of language as it is spoken in a certain place or certain group of people.

40. Mood is



    1. the language that conveys meaning beyond the literal meaning.

    2. the feeling that the writer wants the reader to get.

    3. reflects the writer’s attitude toward his or her subject.

    4. the form of language as it is spoken in a certain place or certain group of people.

41. A simile is

a. a comparison between two seemingly unlike things using “like” or “as.”

b. a comparison between two seemingly unlike things NOT using “like” or

“as.”

c. giving human characteristics to inhuman things.



d. a story that teaches a lesson.

42. The repetition of consonant sounds at the beginning of words is

a. alliteration.

b. assonance.

c. rhyme.

d. rhyme scheme.

43. Imagery is created by appealing to

a. sight and sound.

b. touch.

c. taste and smell.

d. All of the Above
44. When an object, animal, or idea exhibits human qualities, it is called

a. imagery.

b. personification.

c. simile.

d. metaphor.
The Sonnet: List five elements of a Shakespearean sonnet:

45. The meter of a sonnet is called: ______________________________________________

46. This type of meter consists of _____________ syllables. Beginning with the first, the odd numbers syllables are _______________ , while the even ones are _____________________.

47. Rhyme Scheme in a sonnet is called: ________________________________________________________

48. # of Stanzas: ___________________________________________________________

49. The end of a sonnet has two lines that end in the same sound and it is called a _______________________________



Part VI. Grammar: Identifying Sentences, Sentence Fragments, and Run-on Sentences
50. What is a fragment? Write out an example. Then edit it to write them in a complete

sentence.

Fragment: _________________________________________________

Completed Sentence: ________________________________________________________________________


51. What is a run-on? Write out an example. Then edit it to write it in a completed

sentence(s).

Run-on: _________________________________________________

Completed Sentence: ________________________________________________________________________


52. The long neck and spindly legs of the gentle giraffe.



    1. Complete sentence

    2. Sentence fragment
    3. Run-on sentence

53. My twisted ankle has swollen up.



                1. Complete sentence

b. Sentence fragment

c. Run-on sentence


54. The city hall opens at 8 a.m. for car registration.

          1. Complete sentence

b. Sentence fragment

c. Run-on sentence




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