3 Stories set in imaginary worlds



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Objectives

Text/Speaking/Listening


Word/Sentence

Independent group activities

Outcomes

Read eg The Borrowers by Mary Norton as a class book by the start of week 3 of this Unit. Have available in the classroom a variety of books set in imaginary worlds, eg The Green Ship by Quentin Blake, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, the Harry Potter books by J K Rowling, Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak, almost any Colin Thompson books, The Chronicles of Narnia by C S Lewis, Tom’s Midnight Garden by Philippa Pearce, Woof! by Alan Ahlberg, The Hobbit by J R R Tolkien

Week 1 Monday

Main focus: descriptive language of fantasy settings

7. Explain how writers use figurative and expressive language to create images and atmosphere.

8. Read extensively favourite genres and experiment with other types of text. Interrogate texts to deepen/clarify understanding/response. Explore why and how writers write.

Investigate how settings are built up from small details. (T1) Use of adjectives. (Term 2 S1)


Explain to chn that this work for this unit will be based on stories set in imaginary worlds. The Borrowers by Mary Norton is set in a miniature world under the floorboards in an old house. Have chn read any other books (or seen films) set in imaginary worlds, eg Harry Potter, The Chronicles of Narnia, Star Wars, The Lord of the Rings, etc. These are fantasy settings that authors have created in their minds, as maps or as drawings, etc. Tolkien drew maps for The Hobbit & The Lord of the Rings, Mary Norton used small everyday objects as furniture and tools, and J K Rowling had the idea for Harry Potter when on a long & boring train journey.

Teach the work on adjectives now.

Read 2 versions of the same setting (see resources) – one without some details, description & adjectives and the other in full. After the first reading ask chn if they can picture the classroom clearly in their heads, then ask the same question after the full extract and compare answers. How is the light described? Dim & crimson. How would the atmosphere in the room change if the adjectives used were yellow and bright?


Remind chn that an adjective is a word that describes somebody/thing. They come before nouns or after verbs such as: be, get, seem, look, eg the frail old woman or she looked old and frail. (Grammar for Writing Unit 26). Overuse of adjectives is as bad as not using any! Which adjectives could be removed from this passage? (see resources) Which are most effective adjectives to be left in the passage?

Return to text work


All groups

Add description using the five senses to bland, boring description of a setting to paint a clearer picture in the reader’s mind (see resources).

Hard

Chn can improve the sentences by changing the verbs too.

TD


Children can:

1. Recognise and use adjectives.

2. Understand how to create an imaginary setting.

Week 1 Tuesday


Main focus:

features of imaginary settings

7. Identify and summarise evidence from a text to support a hypothesis.

Use knowledge of word structures and origins to develop their understanding of word meanings. (T1) 6. Know & apply common spelling rules. Plurals of words ending in ‘f’. (W5 Term 2)



What things do chn expect to find in imaginary worlds? Magic, witches/wizards; fantastic creatures such as dragons, fairies, elves, monsters; made up names; impossible happenings, etc. Sometimes these things are set in the real world, like Harry Potter or The Borrowers, and sometimes on another planet or in an imaginary world like Star Wars or The Hobbit. The setting involves both place & time – the story may be set in the future, present or past, in a parallel world or outer space. Read the extract from Northern Lights (see resources). What features show chn that the text is from a story about an imagined world? People riding bears, made up names, made up weapons, talking bears. Chn answer a few questions after discussion with a partner: What do chn think a ‘fire-hurler’ does? What or who could ‘gyptians’ be? What picture did chn see in their mind’s eye?

Write ‘elf’ on f/c. What is the plural of elf? Elves. Can chn suggest any other words that have a similar plural? (Calf, scarf, shelf, half.) What could be written as a general rule for words ending in ‘f’? BUT what about cliff, stuff or sniff? Thy simply add an s: cliffs, (food) stuffs, sniffs. So the rule for double ff endings is…? Now write knife & wife on f/c. Plurals? Knives & wives. Play game with ‘show me’ cards (see resources) for ves and fs endings. Add some tricky words that don’t follow the rules: eg belief pl noun: beliefs, but verb: believes; chief: chiefs, proof: proves; roof: roofs. (Spelling Bank p28)


Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn work in pairs to identify & highlight features that indicate a fantasy setting (imaginary world) in The Lord of the Rings excerpt (see resources). ‘Magical ever-blooming flowers & never-fading grass, golden leaves, made up names, elves, old-fashioned way of speaking…’ etc.

TD with groups as necessary


Children can:

1. Identify features of fantasy settings (imaginary worlds).

2. Form plurals of words ending in ‘f’ (see resources).


Plenary

Share findings and create a class checklist of features (see plan resources) showing a fantasy setting (from this exercise & prev discussions). Keep for Week 3.


Week 1 Wednesday


Main focus: write descriptive paragraph

7. Explain how writers use figurative and expressive language to create images and atmosphere.

11. Clarify meaning by using varied sentence structure (phrases, clauses and adverbials). Construct adjectival phrases. (Term 2 S1)


Read chn an extract from Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak – do not show them the book yet (see resources). Is the setting easy to imagine? No! Now show chn the pictures that go with that section of text. The pictures enhance the description of the setting, which was not very detailed. Also the expression on Max’s face helps indicate the atmosphere. The author drew these images, so we know what was in his mind’s eye when he was writing the story.

Write ‘His supper was hot.’ on f/c. What kind of word is hot? Adjective. Now add still before hot (as it is in the book). ‘Still hot’ is an adjectival phrase that acts as an adjective. Swap really for still, a new adjectival phrase. Write ‘The red-haired wild thing was the tallest.’ Ask chn to identify the adjectival phrase. Underline ‘the tallest’. Write ‘Max was smaller than the other wild things.’ Can chn identify the adjectival phrase?


Easy

Chn use the sentence starters (see resources) to write a more detailed description of Max’s room becoming a forest. Remember to include adjectives.



Medium/Hard

Chn write a paragraph to describe Max’s room becoming a forest. Try to include adjectival phrases as well as adjectives.

TD Medium


Children can:

1. Identify and use adjectives & adjectival phrases.

2. Understand how images help the reader envisage a setting.


Plenary

Share some of chn’s descriptions while rest of class close their eyes. Can chn imagine the room?


Week 1 Thursday


Main focus: read & compare descriptions

2. Compare different contributions of words and images in short extracts from films.

7. Explain how writers use expressive language to create images & atmosphere.

Read the text in Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone that describes Diagon Alley to chn while they have their eyes closed (see resources). Then look at the film clip of Diagon Alley (see website list). How similar was the picture in their mind’s eye to the film? Which did chn prefer? Why? Sometimes films upset people who have really enjoyed a book because it doesn’t look as they had imagined it. Would chn be pleased with the film if they had written the book?


Easy/Medium/Hard

Give chn copies of the text (see resources) that describes another clip (Dobbie the House Elf) from Harry Potter, this time Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. Chn annotate the descriptions in the text that they see in the film clip.



Children can:

1. Compare written and visual extracts.

2. Offer an opinion based on evidence.


Plenary

Compare chn’s annotations. What similarities did chn find? Were there any differences? Do chn prefer to use their own imaginations when reading a book? Do chn prefer to read the book and then see the film or vice versa? Why?


Week 1 Friday


Main focus: write sequel

7. Deduce characters’ reasons for behaviour from their actions.

8. Read extensively favourite genres, experiment with text types.


Read chn The Green Ship by Quentin Blake. Who do chn think the captain is/was? Why did Mrs Tredegar welcome them instead of being cross that they had trespassed into her garden? Why was the ship there? Have the chn ever played on something like this in their gardens or a local park? Often there are model castles, forts, steam trains, etc available to play on using your imagination.

Easy

Draw something in the garden that the chn could use to sail to another place. In what part of the world is it? Why does the object remind them of that place? Show your partner and describe the adventure to them. TD


Medium

Draw & annotate something in the garden that chn could use to sail to another place. Is it an animal, a plant or a garden object? Write a few sentences to explain their journey.


Hard

Write a paragraph to describe a voyage that chn could make based on an object, plant or animal that could be found in the garden. Perhaps it is to make-believe country?



Children can:

Write a sequel to the adventures described in a text.



Plenary

Read Robert Louis Stevenson’s poem Block City (p273, The Works 5) or The Land of Counterpane (p391, The Works 3) to see how he imagined other worlds from normal objects found at home.








Objectives

Text/Speaking/Listening

Word/Sentence

Independent group activities


Outcomes

Teacher should be familiar with PhotoPlus 6 for Monday’s lesson. Other photo-editing programs that the school has available can be used instead.

Week 2 Monday


Main focus:

create fantasy landscapes

2. Compare diff contributions of words and images.

9. Use settings to engage readers’ interest. Choose/ combine words, images etc. for particular effects.

12. Use ICT to present work.


Demonstrate how to use PhotoPlus 6 (free download – see website list) or similar Photo-editing software. Model using it to change landscape photo downloaded from digital camera or from internet, into a fantasy setting. [Examples can be shown from resources - these include a description of the effects used.] Open a photograph in PhotoPlus 6 then click on Image. The drop down menu has many options to explore. Show chn how, eg red colours create a warm, friendly atmosphere, but blues create a colder more hostile atmosphere. Remind chn that they can use Edit, Undo to go back to original if they don’t like the changes they have made. Encourage chn to create threatening environments and calmer places of safety.
Easy/Medium/Hard

In small mixed ability groups chn create fantasy/imaginary setting(s) from landscapes that they have downloaded from the internet (or use local landscapes captured on digital camera). Chn experiment to create a range of settings with differing atmospheres. Save (in PhotoPlus 6 you will need to Export… as a .jpg file) their favourite landscapes. Chn should make a record of how they created the images using one or more of the options to share with other groups later. Chn also write a phrase to describe the atmosphere of the setting, eg sad & gloomy in cave, magical forest. Each group needs to save four different images – not four versions of the same image. TD with groups as required


Children can:

1. Create fantasy settings from digital landscape using photo-editing software.



Plenary

Share some landscapes, discuss the atmosphere created. From notes group state which options were used & what atmosphere these are intended to communicate to reader. Other chn provide feedback on effectiveness of effects used.


Week 2 Tuesday


7. Identify and summarise evidence from a text to support a hypothesis. Explain how writers use figurative and expressive language to create images and atmosphere.

Settings effect characters’ behaviour. (T2 Term 2)



Show chn how the characters actions & reactions can help indicate the setting and the atmosphere. Write on f/c: ‘He thought: can’t just stand here. Stay still, and your face aches and your fingers stiffen.’ What sort of setting must the character be in? Does the next line help? ‘The cold cuts right into you…’ The extract is from A Hole in the Head by Nicholas Fisk, and the setting is a research centre near the North Pole in the future.

Write: ‘The cold cuts right into you…’ on f/c. Do chn know what this is an example of? What is the cold described as – a knife. This is a metaphor. Can chn think of other metaphors to describe the cold, eg ‘the cold clamped his chest, making it difficult to breathe?’ Or can chn think of a simile to describe the cold, eg ‘as cold as ice?’ Which do chn think is the most effective?

Easy

Chn listen carefully to the description from The Hobbit (see resources) with their eyes closed. Then listen again and draw the setting as they imagine it.


Medium/Hard

As Easy group, but chn annotate their picture too.

TD Medium


Children can:

1. Recognise metaphors & similes.

2. Understand that characters react to the setting in which they find themselves.


Plenary Give a copy of text to each group and chn compare their pictures. Chn identify details missed from their drawing and/or details that they have added.

Week 2 Wednesday


Main focus: adjectives – degrees of intensity.

6. Develop a range of strategies for learning new/irregular words.

7. Deduce characters' reasons for behaviour from their actions.

Comparing adjectives on a scale of intensity.

(S1 Term 2)


Use some of the fantasy setting images that chn created on Monday. Enlarge one on IWB. Discuss how the image could make the characters feel and decide on appropriate facial gestures and body postures to reflect their inner thoughts. Freeze-frame chn in front of the images showing various responses to the settings. Take digital photographs (Digital Blue camera?) of the freeze-frames to record the ideas and for later use to support chn's writing.

Have a series of cards ready with words describing heat (see resources). Give out to 8 chn. Can they order the words by degrees of intensity? Which describes the most heat, which the least? GfW Unit 26. Can use a dictionary if not sure of words. Now show chn an emotional response scale showing degrees of intensity (see resources). Move (click and drag) three remaining characters to their most likely position on the scale.


Easy

Chn sort other sets of words (see resources) in order by degrees of intensity.

TD


Medium

Chn create an emotional response scale for happiness, using depressed, happy, sad, exhilarated, etc. using thesaurus to help.



Hard

Chn create an emotional response scale for care, using eg careful, reckless, daring, etc & thesaurus.



Children can:

1. Recognise and use degrees of intensity of adjectives.

2. Use a thesaurus.


Plenary Share emotional scales.

Week 2 Thursday


Main focus: understand adverbs

7. Deduce characters' reasons for behaviour from their actions.

8. Explore how writers write.

11. Clarify meaning & point of view by using varied sentence structure (phrases, clauses & adverbials).

Identify adverbs & understand their functions. (T4)


Teach this second

Remind chn that yesterday we considered how characters react to the setting. Authors describe the physical appearance of the characters in the story, but also describe their thoughts and their feelings, eg by descriptions of facial expressions, body posture, speech and behaviour. Adjectives and adverbs can be used for this. Use an eg’The man was drumming his fingers loudly and glancing impatiently at his watch.’ Can chn suggest when this might be used in a story?


Teach this first

Write happily, sadly, greedily, slowly on f/c. What type of words are these? Adverbs. What do the words have in common? Suffix –ly. Explain that this suffix is the common form of adverbs. What do they do? They qualify the meaning of verbs (describe how something is done). –ly means ‘in this manner’. Many adverbs answer the question ’How?’ Grammar for Writing Unit 23. Enlarge sentence ‘Dobby was banging his head furiously on the window.’ (See resources.) Which is the adverb? Which verb does it qualify? Now disclose other versions of the sentence – the position of the adverb has been changed. Do they all make sense? Do they all mean the same? Note the comma required in one sentence. Show enlarged extract of one of Harry Potter extracts used last week. Can chn find other adverbs & the verb they qualify?


Easy/Medium/Hard

Play a charades-type game involving adverbs. Give chd a card with a verb & adverb on for them to mime (see resources) – using exaggerated facial expressions and movements. Other chn guess the word and explain which expression or movement was the clue that gave it away. How could that expression or movement be used in a story?

TD supervising game!


Children can:

1. Identify adverbs & the verb they qualify.

2. Understand that an adverb can be placed in different positions within a sentence.

Week 2 Friday


Main focus: understand adverbs

7. Deduce characters' reasons for behaviour from their actions.

11. Clarify meaning & point of view by using varied sentence structure (phrases, clauses & adverbials).

Identify adverbs & understand their functions. (T4)



Look again at the freeze-frame digital images taken on Wednesday. Discuss the responses the characters are making to the setting. Can chn describe the characters and/or the setting using adjectives & adverbs? Note some good examples next to the images for future use.

Look again at the emotional response scale (Wednesday). Can chn think of some adverbs to describe the way those four characters would act? Fearfully, uneasily, bravely, fearlessly or calmly – accept others. Now look at the first set of Degrees of Intensity words the Easy grp ordered on Wednesday. Can these be changed into adverbs, eg dazzlingly, dimly, brightly, hazily (note y change to i).

Easy

Look at the other sets of words from Wednesday’s Degrees of Intensity list. Chn change suitable words into adverbs.


Medium

Change the Degrees of Intensity words into adverbs. Use one adverb from each list in a sentence describing a setting or a character. TD



Hard

As Medium, but for each sentence written, try exchanging the adverb for another adverb from the same set, eg The lamp lit the room brightly. The lamp lit the room dimly.



    Children can:

    1. Understand how adverbs can be derived from adjectives.

    2. Use adverbs in their writing.

    3. Understand that substituting one adverb for another can change the meaning of a sentence.



Plenary

Look at the sentences written by Hard group. Discuss how changing the adverb changes the setting or character? Write ‘They left the house …..…..ly.’ on f/c. In pairs, chn think of as many adverbs as possible to fill the gap.








Objectives

Text/Speaking/Listening

Word/Sentence

Independent group activities


Outcomes

Week 3 Monday

Main focus: plan a fantasy story-setting

9. Develop and refine ideas in writing using planning and problem-solving strategies. Use settings and characterisation to engage readers' interest.

Use different ways to plan stories. (T9)

Plan a story identifying the stages of its telling. (T10)


Explain that chn are going to write their own story set in an imaginary world this week. Look at the possible story skeleton plan (see resources) together. Arrange the key elements of the structure into order. Save this to be used by chn in planning their own story. Discuss how The Borrowers would fit this structure, eg Meet the characters, when the Clock family were introduced at the beginning; Thrilling escape when the Clock family leave the house for the fields. It involves a journey from setting to setting. What were the main settings in The Borrowers? The Clock family’s home, the hallway, outside the door and in the fields. Show chn four of the fantasy images in the resources (or your own images based on local environment). Discuss which of the 4 settings would be most suitable at different stages in the story. Experiment with the order of the images, alternating threatening environments with calmer places of safety. Remind chn that the Clock family went back to the safety of their home at intervals.
Easy/Medium/Hard

This week chn will work in the groups from last Monday. Chn repeat the ordering process with their four saved images of the settings in their imaginary world. Chn can copy & paste the images into different orders and save them for future discussion. Try to create a feeling of tension followed by a breathing space. Chn might want to adjust one or more of their images at this point to fit the story structure better. This is similar to planning using a map. TD with groups as necessary

Children can:

1. Plan a story outline using images of settings.

2. Distinguish between threatening settings and peaceful settings.

Plenary

Ask chn to reflect on the different order of their settings to assess which sequence would have the most impact on the reader – peaceful, threatening and then peaceful again.

Week 3 Tuesday


Main focus: tell an oral fantasy story

1. Tell stories effectively and convey detailed information coherently for listeners.

3. Take different roles in groups and use the language appropriate to them, including the roles of leader, reporter, scribe and mentor. (T9)(T10)


Look at the blank story hill (see resources). Discuss how The Borrowers would fit this model (see resources). Model how to tell an oral version of a fantasy story using 4 of the setting images and either or both of the story structures as support. Small role-play figures could be used as a stimulus for the main characters, though chn must be encouraged to describe their own characters, not the play figures. Why is their character going on this journey? What obstacles (natural, eg storm or desert; extraordinary creatures; being trapped or chased; having a code or maze to solve) will their characters meet in each setting? Will they find any magical objects? Will they meet a new character – a friendly helper or an evil creature? How do they overcome the obstacles? Make up some wonderful names for the characters, the places and the creatures.

Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn work in their groups to tell an oral version of their story set in their imaginary world. Encourage chn to describe the characters’ reactions to the settings. One member of each group can make notes on each stage of the story. Note the obstacles, other characters, ways that obstacles are overcome, etc. Note any objects that are magical or creatures that help or hinder. Each box will represent one paragraph in their story. Another member of group lists any key words or phrases as a word bank for the whole group to use. TD with groups as necessary


Children can:

1. Tell an oral story.

2. Use different structures to aid their planning.

Plenary


Ask for a volunteer group to share their ideas. Rest of chn give feedback. Do other groups have particular ideas or keywords to share?

Objectives

Text/Speaking/Listening

Word/Sentence

Independent group activities


Outcomes

Week 3 Wednesday


Main focus: Write story introduction

6. Use knowledge of phonics, morphology and etymology to spell new and unfamiliar words. Suffixes –al & –ic. (T7)

9. Show imagination thro the language used to create emphasis, humour, atmosphere or suspense.


Teach this second

Introductory paragraph(s) of chn’s own story will describe the setting and introduce the characters. Model how to write this (see resources for one example). Encourage chn to try to include interesting adjectives, perhaps with -al or -ic suffixes. (Grammar for Writing, Unit 25)


Teach this first

Write ‘Harry Potter is an exceptional and sensational wizard.’ on f/c. What do chn notice about underlined words? Suffix –al. -al means ‘relating to’ or ‘of the kind of’. Can chn think of other egs? Traditional, seasonal... Now write ‘Harry Potter met some horrific creatures, which were not angelic.’ What is the suffix? –ic. –ic is a suffix used to form adjectives from a noun. Note that root words drop a final e or change y to i before the suffix. (Spelling Bank p25)


Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn write the introductory paragraph of their narrative. Use word banks, oral stories, planning notes (on story skeleton or story hill), etc. Use checklist that class collated on Tuesday, Week 1. Chn should be encouraged to support each other within their groups. TD with Easy



Children can:

1. Recognise and use the suffixes

–al and –ic.

2. Write an introductory paragraph describing the first setting & introducing the main character(s).



Plenary

Ask confident chn to share their opening paragraph. Others listen with eyes closed. Can they imagine the setting inside their heads?



Time for extended writing outside the Literacy lesson will be useful during the next two days. Access to a computer suite would allow publishing using ICT incorporating the images of the settings prepared earlier.

Week 3 Thursday


Main focus: Write story

9. Show imagination through language used to create emphasis, humour, suspense atmosphere. Choose/combine words, images, features for particular effects.

10. Organise text into paragraphs to distinguish between different information, events or processes. (T15)


Give chn plenty of time today to continue writing their story set in an imaginary world. Remind chn that each box on their planning sheets represents one paragraph (Hard group may write more paragraphs for each section). Remind chn of checklist:

  • Another place or time
  • Use senses to describe setting


  • Use adjectives & adjectival phrases (similes, metaphors)

  • Include make-believe characters

  • Use made-up words

  • Use special effects

  • Make the characters react to the setting

  • Use adverbs to qualify the verbs

Easy/Medium/Hard

Ask chn to rehearse their stories orally as a group briefly. Look again at the images of their settings and the plans based on the story skeleton or story hill. Have they used the key words and phrases that they collected as a group? Then chn continue to write their story using paragraphs.



Children can:

1. Use the features of fantasy stories in their own writing.

2. Write in paragraphs to distinguish between different events.


Plenary

Ask for volunteers to share one of their made-up words. Can the other chn guess what the word refers to? Ask chn to share the description of the main character – can other chn decide if it is a friendly helpful character or one of the obstacles to be overcome?


Week 3 Friday


Main focus: Edit & publish story

10. Use adverbs and conjunctions to establish cohesion within paragraphs.

11. Clarify meaning and point of view by using varied sentence structure (phrases, clauses & adverbials).

12. Write consistently with neat, legible handwriting. Use word processing to present written work.


Remind chn how to insert images into their text document. Remind chn again of the features of a fantasy story. Chn are going to have the opportunity to edit and redraft their stories today. (Grammar for Writing, Unit 20) Thumbs up if: they used the checklist, they used adjectives of different degrees of intensity, they used adverbs, & so on.


Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn edit and redraft their own work and then share it with a response partner within their group. Give critical but positive feedback based on the success criteria & using 3 Stars and 1 Wish (see resources). Give chn further time to respond to the feedback. All or some of chn could use ICT to present their work for an audience, inserting the images of the settings into the text document.

Publish the stories in booklets – one for each group. Ensure at least one copy of the images of the settings is included in each booklet.


Children can:

1. Edit and redraft their own work.

2. Give constructive criticism to a response partner.

3. Present their work for an audience.



Scroll down for success criteria and book & website lists.
Success criteria for the block – these should be selected & adjusted to match the specific needs of the class being taught.

Easy

Medium

Hard

  • Recognise and use adjectives

  • Identify some features of fantasy settings (imaginary worlds)

  • Form plurals of common words ending in ‘f’

  • Understand how images help the reader envisage a setting

  • Compare written and visual extracts

  • With support create fantasy settings from digital landscape using photo-editing software

  • Recognise and with help use metaphors & similes

  • Recognise and with support begin to use degrees of intensity of adjectives

  • Use a thesaurus
  • Identify adverbs & the verb they qualify


  • Derive some adverbs from adjectives

  • Begin to use adverbs in their writing

  • Plan a story outline using images of settings

  • Tell an oral story

  • Begin to use structures to aid their planning

  • Begin to use the features of fantasy stories in their own writing

  • Write an opening paragraph

  • With support edit and redraft their own work

  • Give constructive criticism to a response partner

  • Present their work for an audience

  • Recognise and use adjectives and begin to use adjectival phrases

  • Identify features of fantasy settings (imaginary worlds)

  • Form plurals of words ending in ‘f’

  • Understand how images help the reader envisage a setting

  • Compare written and visual extracts

  • Offer an opinion

  • Write a sequel to the adventures described in a text

  • Create fantasy settings from digital landscape using photo-editing software

  • Recognise and begin to use metaphors & similes

  • Understand that characters react to the setting in which they find themselves

  • Recognise/begin to use degrees of intensity of adjectives

  • Use a thesaurus

  • Identify adverbs & the verb they qualify

  • Understand that an adverb can be placed in different positions within a sentence

  • Understand how adverbs can be derived from adjectives

  • Begin to use adverbs in their writing

  • Plan a story outline using images of settings

  • Distinguish between threatening and peaceful settings

  • Tell an oral story
  • Use structures to aid their planning


  • Recognise the suffixes –al and –ic

  • Use the features of fantasy stories in their own writing

  • Begin to write in paragraphs to distinguish between different events

  • Edit and redraft their own work

  • Give constructive criticism to a response partner

  • Present their work for an audience

  • Recognise and use adjectives and adjectival phrases

  • Identify features of fantasy settings (imaginary worlds)

  • Form plurals of words ending in ‘f’

  • Understand how images help reader envisage a setting

  • Compare written and visual extracts

  • Offer an opinion based on evidence

  • Write a sequel to the adventures described in a text

  • Create fantasy settings from digital landscape using photo-editing software

  • Recognise and use metaphors & similes

  • Describe how characters react to the setting in which they find themselves

  • Recognise and use degrees of intensity of adjectives

  • Use a thesaurus

  • Identify adverbs & the verb they qualify

  • Understand that an adverb can be placed in different positions within a sentence

  • Understand how adverbs can be derived from adjectives

  • Use adverbs in their writing

  • Understand that substituting one adverb for another can change the meaning of a sentence

  • Plan a story outline using images of settings

  • Distinguish between threatening and peaceful settings

  • Tell an oral story

  • Use different structures to aid their planning

  • Recognise and use the suffixes –al and –ic

  • Use the features of fantasy stories in their own writing
  • Write in paragraphs to distinguish between different events


  • Edit and redraft their own work

  • Give constructive criticism to a response partner

  • Present their work for an audience


Books:

The Borrowers by Mary Norton (Puffin ISBN: 978-0140364514)

The Green Ship by Quentin Blake (Red Fox ISBN: 978-0099253327)

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (Macmillan ISBN: 0333738365/ 978-0333738368)

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J K Rowling (Bloomsbury Publishing PLC ISBN: 978-0747532743)

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J K Rowling (Bloomsbury Publishing PLC ISBN: 978-0747538486)

Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak (Red Fox ISBN: 978-0099408390)

The Chronicles of Narnia series by C S Lewis (Collins ISBN: 978-0007116768)

His Dark Materials trilogy by Philip Pullman (Scholastic ISBN: 978-1407104164)

Tom’s Midnight Garden by Philippa Pearce (Puffin Books ISBN: 978-0141319995)

Woof! by Alan Ahlberg (Puffin Books ISBN: 978-0140319965)

The Hobbit by J R R Tolkien (HarperCollins ISBN: 978-0006754022)

The Lord of the Rings trilogy by J R R Tolkien (HarperCollins ISBN: 978-0261102385)

A Hole in the Head by Nicholas Fisk (Walker Books ISBN: 978-0744523591)

The Works 3 by Paul Cookson (Macmillan ISBN: 0330415786)

The Works 5 by Paul Cookson (Macmillan ISBN: 0330398709)


Websites:

http://www.screenonline.org.uk/film/id/578322/index.html Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone video clip


http://www.screenonline.org.uk/film/id/712535/index.html Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets video clip

http://www.photo-freeware.net/photoplus.php Download PhotoPlus 6

http://www.screenonline.org.uk/tv/id/569206/index.html The Borrowers video clip

http://www.screenonline.org.uk/tv/id/562736/index.html The Chronicles of Narnia video clip






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