Acquisition Lesson Plan for the Concept, Topic or Skill Not for the Day Acquisition Lesson Plan Concept: a retelling of a Story Includes Key Details



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Acquisition Lesson

Plan for the Concept, Topic or Skill---Not for the Day

Acquisition Lesson Plan Concept: A Retelling of a Story Includes Key Details
Acquisition Lessons need to be differentiated; use multiple methods of presentation, strategic instruction and assessment to differentiate learning.
Author Name(s): Denise DiSabatino Allen, Denise Brosius, Kathy Casey
Grade: 1 __________________ Time Frame: 3 days

Pre-requisite(s): Tell any story, real or invented.


Common Core Standard(s): CCSS # 2 Literary (1) - Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson.

Essential Question:

How can we use the key details in a story to help us understand the central message or lesson?


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What do students need to learn to be able to answer the Essential Question?

Assessment Prompt (AP) #1: Determine the key details in the beginning of the story by asking the question: What do you already know about foxes/wolves in literature? What do we know about this fox (referring to the Fox and the Stork)?


Assessment Prompt #2: Determine the key details at the end of the story by asking the question: What were the key details that happened in the end of the story, “The Fox and the Stork?”

Assessment Prompt #3: Determine the lesson that the story taught: What lesson does Fox learn? What is the central message/lesson of the story?
Note to teacher:

Key details should provide the reader with information about the topic. (Goudvis and Harvey, 2000)




Activating Strategy:

  • Talk about folktales and fables by making a chart and telling the children that they are going to read an old fable about a fox who likes to play tricks. Draw a two column chart with story titles as suggested below or any others that are familiar to the students. Read the titles aloud and ask students to tell who tricks someone in the story. Provide answers as needed. Encourage children to tell a little bit about one or two stories.

STORY

WHO PLAYS TRICKS

“The Three Little Pigs”

Third Pig

“Little Red Riding Hood”

The Wolf

“Anansi the Spider”

Anansi








  • (Optional) Gather several fairy tales or fables that illustrate a fox or wolf as a tricky character. Do 1 story each day, as an activator, and briefly discuss the fox and/or wolf as a trickster.

Key Vocabulary Words to Preview:

  • Retell

  • Key Details

  • Characters

  • Events

  • Lesson

  • Central Message

  • Fable




Teaching Strategies: Collaborative Pairs, Read Aloud, Think Aloud, Guided Practice
Graphic Organizer:

Story Worm (Attachment 2)



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Instruction:

  • Using the story, “The Fox and the Stork” (Attachment 1) tell the students, “In this story you need to be the detectives. Sometimes stories teach a lesson. You will need to be detectives and figure out the lesson of our story.

  • As we read, let’s find the details that help us figure out the lesson of “The Fox and the Stork”.

  • Choral read the first two paragraphs of the story, “The Fox and the Stork.”

  • Teacher prompts students (Distributed Summarizing) by asking,
    • “Do you think Fox is being nice?” (students respond by thumbs up or down)


    • “Do you think Fox is planning a trick?” (students respond by thumbs up or down)

    • Extend by asking “why or why not” and have students answer in Collaborative Pairs

  • Teacher and students continue reading page one of the story.

  • Teacher stops reading after paragraph four when Fox plays his trick on stork.

  • Teacher asks students to be detectives and think-pair-share the following:

    • “Why do you think Fox served the soup in a flat dish?”

    • “Why does Fox feel very smart?”

    • “Why was Stork still very hungry when she left Fox’s house?”

    • “Why did Fox laugh?”

AP #1: Using the first page of the story: What do you already know about foxes/wolves in literature? What do we know about this fox (referring to The Fox and the Stork)?

  • Ask students, “What does Fox like to do?”

  • Students Pair-Share their answers.

  • Teacher records sequence of key details on large class Story Worm Graphic Organizer

    • Fox and Stork are friends

    • Fox plays a trick on Stork

Instruction:

  • Teacher and students read the first four paragraphs on page two of the story.

  • Teacher reminds students that we are being “detectives”. We need to look for key details as detectives. What was a key detail we already found out? (refer back to Story Worm GO.)

  • Teacher stops students when stork plays her trick on fox (paragraph four page two).

  • Teacher asks students to be detectives and think-pair-share the following:
    • “Why can’t Fox eat the soup?”


    • “Why do you think Stork serves the soup in a tall jar?”

    • “Does Fox feel smart now? Why or why not?”

AP #2: Determine the key details of the story by asking the question: What were the key details that happened in the end of the story?

Instruction:

  • Teacher reviews the key details on the large class Story Worm. “What key details have we already found out?” (refer to GO.)

  • Teacher and students finish reading the last paragraph of the story.

  • Teacher asks students to be detectives and think-pair-share the following:

    • “Why is Fox so hungry?”

    • “Do you think Fox will keep tricking his friends? Why?”


AP #3: Determine the key details at the end of the story and the lesson that the story taught: What lesson does Fox learn? What is the central message/lesson of the story?

  • Teacher reminds students that we were being “detectives” and as detectives we looked for key details to help us figure out the lesson of the story.

  • Teacher asks students, “What lesson does Fox learn?”

    • Students Think-Pair-Share.

  • “What is the central message/lesson of the story?”
    • Students Think-Pair-Share.


  • Teacher models how to fill in the “Central Message or Lesson” on the large class Story Worm GO.

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Assignment: None

Summarizing Strategy:

  • Teacher picks 1 of the fairy tales/fables from the activating strategy used throughout the 4 day lesson (this can be differentiated).

  • Teacher may also pick an animated fable from the following website (differentiation)

http://us.penguingroup.com/static/packages/us/yreaders/aesop/index.html



  • Teacher gives students their own individual Story Worm Graphic Organizer (Attachment 3)

  • Students work in pairs to fill out the Story Worm GO related to their individual books.

  • Pairs Squared: Pairs share their Story Worm with another pair.

Additional or alternate Summarizing Strategy: Attachment 4




Resources/Citations:

Graphic organizer- Story map (Story Worm)

Chart paper (if needed)

Selected Fairy Tales/Fables – The Tortoise and the Hare, The Three Little Pigs, Little Red Riding Hood, The Lion and the Mouse, The Fox and the Stork

Website: http://us.penguingroup.com/static/packages/us/yreaders/aesop/index.html

Attachment 1

The Fox and the Stork


Long ago a Fox and a Stork made friends with each other.


Fox, who liked to play tricks on his friends, invited Stork to dinner. Fox made a pot of soup, and nothing else, for dinner. He poured the soup into two flat bowls. He put the bowls on the table and placed a bowl in front of Stork.
“Here is some delicious soup I made for you,” said Fox, “I hope you enjoy it!” Fox felt very smart.
It was easy for Fox to lap up the soup but poor Stork could only wet the tip of her long bill in the soup. Soon Fox slurped it all up!
Stork was still very hungry when she left Fox’s house. Fox laughed about the trick he just played on Stork.

The next week Stork asked the Fox to come to dinner at her house. Stork also made a pot of soup, and nothing else, for dinner.


Stork served the soup in a tall, thin jar. She put the jar in front of Fox.
“Here is some delicious soup I made for you,” said Stork, “I hope you enjoy it!”
It was easy for Stork to drink the soup with her long bill but poor Fox could not get a drop.
Fox was still very hungry when he left the Stork’s house.

He moaned and groaned, “I’m so hungry! This is my reward for tricking a friend!”


Pictures from http://wwriter.hubpages.com/slide/The-fox-and-the-stork/1159709








THE FOX and THE STORK

Characters

FOX
STORK


Characters
Fox

Stork



Detail
Fox and Stork are friends.



Detail
Fox plays a

trick on Stork.





Detail

Stork plays a

trick on Fox.



Detail

Fox is not happy.





Central Message
Lesson

Attachment 3


Detail


Central Message

Lesson

STORY WORM

Story or Book_____________________________________

Attachment 4


Name _________________________ Date _______________
The Fox and the Stork
Circle the key details from the story.
Fox served Stork’s soup on a flat dish.

Fox is red.

Fox likes to play tricks on his friends.

Fox felt smart when he tricked Stork.

Fox was tricked by his friend.

It is Spring.



Fox learned the lesson to be kind to others.


Lesson plan format adapted from Learning-Focused Strategies. Thompson, M., Thompson, J. (2011).





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