Acquisition Lesson Plan for the Concept, Topic or Skill Not for the Day Acquisition Lesson Plan Concept

:)


Download 64.4 Kb.
Date conversion23.11.2016
Size64.4 Kb.



Acquisition Lesson

Plan for the Concept, Topic or Skill---Not for the Day

Acquisition Lesson Plan Concept: Character, Setting, and Plot

Acquisition Lessons need to be differentiated; use multiple methods of presentation, strategic instruction and assessment to differentiate learning. Differentiation is italicized within the lesson.
Author Name(s): Lara Crowley, Kathleeen Devine, Amy Kalafut

Grade: 8 Time Frame: 3 days

Pre-requisite(s):

CCRL.6.3 Describe how a particular story's or drama's plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution.

CCRL.7.3 Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot). CC7RL3


Common Core Standard(s): CCRL.8.3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.



Essential Question:
How do good readers analyze text to determine the affect of story elements in propelling action within the story?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

What do students need to learn to be able to answer the Essential Question?

Assessment Prompt (AP) #1: Identify the story elements in literary work.


Assessment Prompt #2: Infer the impact of the setting as it relates to the plot.

Assessment Prompt #3: Explain (tell, write, or graphically represent) how characters, setting, and plot elements interact to solve a problem.


Activating Strategy:
Students will listen to rap song describing character, setting and plot. Then students will work with collaborative partner to complete word scramble to assist in building background knowledge around the vocabulary terms in this lesson.

http://www.educationalrap.com/song/characters-setting-plot.html (This activator would fit the UDL framework)

Students could also read the song lyrics with their collaborative partner. Then together choose three literary elements of fiction that they feel are most important to develop an interesting story. Students need to provide support for their choices. Students will then take turns reporting out the choices they made.

Optional Activating Strategy:

Students will utilize character trading card site from Read, Write, Think or trading card site from Big Huge Labs to create initial link to topic. They will create cards for the vocabulary for this lesson (character, setting, plot, protagonist, antagonist, minor characters, conflict and resolution).
http://www.readwritethink.net/files/resources/interactives/trading_cards/

http://bighugelabs.com/



Key Vocabulary Words to Preview:
Character

Setting


Plot

Protagonist

Antagonist

Conflict


Climax

Rising Action

Falling Action

Resolution

Teaching Strategies:
Collaborative Pairs R.A.F.T summary to extend thinking (analyzing perspectives)

Numbered Heads Vocabulary trading cards http://bighugelabs.com/

Character Map I Have …Who Has

Setting Map Changes in the Wind

Conflict Map $2.00 Summary

Resolution Map




Graphic Organizer:


http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/student-interactives/story-30008.html

Students will utilize the character, conflict, setting and resolution graphic organizers to assist students in visualizing the story elements.


Materials Needed:

  • Rap song “Characters, setting, plot”

  • Lyrics to song

  • Literary elements scramble activity

  • Excerpt of text The Juvies Three, by Gordon Korman from Scholastic Canada http://www.scholastic.ca/titles/thejuviethree/

  • Alternative Text: Short Story “The Elevator” by William Sleator

  • http://www.ridge.k12.wa.us/15822011118285850/lib/15822011118285850%5C_CalAttachments%5Cnov%202%20the%20elevator.PDF




  • Wordle link and example http://www.wordle.net/show/wrdl/3138869/Children_Poem

  • Vocabulary trading cards created in launch


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Instruction:

  1. After students have completed the activating strategies, teacher will provide definitions and graphic representation of the previewed words. Students will work in pairs to quiz each other with vocabulary trading cards depicting the ten essential vocabulary words. The teams will use their cards as a method of review throughout the lesson.


  2. Display for the students the definition of the word character.

Character: the combination of traits and qualities distinguishing the individual nature of a person

Imaginary people created by the writer. Perhaps the most important element of literature. An example of a character would be Darth Vader from Star Wars. He was the evil force throughout the story.









  1. Ask students to pair up with a partner and list at least ten characters that they can remember from books or movies and write at least one trait to describe the characters chosen. Students will take turns listing characters and their traits. Then share list with class members.

  2. Introduce the lesson essential question: How do good readers use the characters and setting to help them understand the plot of the story?

  3. Review with students the types of characters: protagonist, antagonist, and minor characters. Students will create graphic organizer for each of these terms providing definition (in student’s own words), visual, and an example of each. Students will share their organizers with a peer and provide feedback.

  4. Students will read excerpt of text from novel: “The Juvie Three” by Gordon Korman (LL750) searching for the protagonist, antagonist and minor characters in the piece. Using the character graphic organizer they will list character, type, and reasons for their choices.

**If students are not reading at the seventh grade level, teacher may read the selection aloud while students search for these characters independently –then pair up with partner and discuss choices.


  1. Students will pair up and the number ones will explain choices and their support to number twos. Number twos will share out number one’s answers.


AP #1: Changes in the Wind -Students will complete “Changes in the Wind” independently to summarize ideas about characters in the excerpt “The Juvie Three”.

Instruction:

Setting: Surroundings: the surroundings or environment in which something exists or takes place. An example of a setting would be aboard The Millennium Falcon at the time of its capture, HanSolo’s fighter ship from Star Wars.


1. Ask students to pair up with a partner and list ten settings from novels or movies.

2. Direct students to go back to the excerpt and describe the setting of this story explaining why they believe the story takes place there and how the setting assists in propelling action. (Example: Little Red Riding Hood –it takes place in the woods as the story talks about her long walk through the forest. The setting is important as the forest enables readers to picture a house far away from neighbors and there may be no possibility for Little Red Riding Hood to find help if attacked. ) Use the setting graphic organizer to document choice.

3. Students will pair up and the number twos will explain choices and their support to number ones. Number ones will share out number two’s answers.

AP #2: Drawing or Sketch

Students will choose one sentence from the excerpt that depicts setting in “The Juvies Three”. Students will sketch a picture of the setting for the excerpt “The Juvies Three”. Each student will explain in three sentences why a reader might find this information necessary to understand how the setting propels the action in this excerpt.


Instruction:


  1. Display for the students the definition of the word plot.

Plot: Story Line: the story or sequence of events in something such as a novel, play, or movie. For example the original plot of Star Wars begins as Darth Vader nears completion of the massive Death Star space station, which will allow the Empire to crush the Rebel Alliance, which has formed to combat Palpatine's tyranny.






  1. Direct students to go back to the excerpt and describe the plot at this point explaining why they believe this to be true. How do the setting and characters assist in propelling the action? (Example: Little Red Riding Hood – The wolf plans on eating Little Red Riding Hood because he makes statements that show the reader what he wants to do) Use the conflict graphic organizer to document choice.

  2. Students will pair up and the number twos will explain choices and their support to number ones. Number ones will share out number two’s answers.

  1. Students will review vocabulary words utilizing the: I have…Who has strategy.



AP #3: $2.00 Summary - Students will explain the plot of the excerpt read in 20 words. Have students imagine they are placing a classified ad or sending a telegram, where every word used costs them money. Tell them each word costs 10 cents, and then tell them they can spend "so much." For instance, if you say they have $2.00 to spend, then that means they have to write a summary that has no more than 20 words.

Option #2: Students could paste the excerpt into the Wordle program and see which words were mentioned most often. Did this tool assist them in determining the plot of the excerpt or assist them in inferring the story line of the novel? Why – Why not.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Assignment:

After reading the excerpt from “The Juvies Three”, write the next page describing what happened to the characters after everything went dark. Share your creation with a peer. Have your partner write down everything they remember about your creation in two minutes. See if they could remember the plot of your piece. (deductive reasoning/prediction)


Or write R.A.F.T. response choosing the role, audience, format and topic. See attached choices.


Summarizing Strategy:
Students will utilize the information compiled from previous assessment prompts to answer the lesson essential question: How do good readers analyze text to determine the affect of story elements in propelling action within the story?


Resources/Citations:

Korman, Gordon. The Juvie Three. New York: Hyperion, c2008. http://www.scholastic.ca/titles/thejuviethree/

Sleator, William. The Elevator. New York: Harper & Rowe, c1989.

Rhythm & Rhyme. Character, Setting, Plot. Educational Rap.com., c2008.





Attachment 1

Excerpt from THE JUVIE THREE

by Gordon Korman

*Additional texts could be substituted for the sample text provided in this lesson.

**Excerpt could be read aloud by teacher as students highlight words that assist in inferring information about the character and setting.

***Pictures could be added throughout the excerpt to assist struggling readers in the comprehension of the text. Gecko Fosse is behind the wheel of a powder blue Infiniti M45 sedan, enjoying the thrum of the idling engine and not thinking. Gecko has elevated not thinking to the level of high art. He’s almost as good at it as he is at driving, and that’s very good.


Right now he’s not thinking about the fact that he’s too young to hold a license — that he’s still got two years to go before he even qualifies for a learner’s permit. He’s not thinking about what his brother, Reuben, meant when he said he needed to “pick something up” at an electronic games store that closed two hours ago.

Mostly, he’s not thinking about the bald guy in the rearview mirror, sprinting up behind him, waving his arms and yelling.

Hey, that’s my car!"



The bald guy grabs for the door handle, but Gecko is already squealing away from the curb, grooving on the burst of acceleration. It’s his favorite feeling — that boost of pure power, like a titanic hand propelling him forward.

There’s the store, coming up on the left. A flick of Gecko’s wrist, a tap on the brake, and the Infiniti is right there. The place is dark. No sign of Reuben and his buddies. Gecko rabbit-punches the leather of the steering wheel, producing a staccato honk of the horn. Reuben leans into the window display of Wiis, waving him urgently away. Gecko stomps on the gas and wheels around the corner out of sight.

Reuben — there’s someone not to think about. This is supposed to be his new ride. Gecko’s gaze darts to the ignition, which has been ripped out, a pair of wires protruding from the column. No key. Reuben and his friends think they’re so gangster, but they’re really more like the Keystone Cops. Leave it to them to steal a car and then wave it right in front of the guy who used to own it. And if they’re dumb enough to pull something like that, who knows what they’re up to inside the House of Games?

He turns left and left again, circling back onto Jackson. It’s effortless. The wheel is an extension of his hands, just the way he likes it. Gecko’s the car, and the car is Gecko. Not bad, this M45 . . .


Uh-oh. The bald guy’s dead ahead, and he’s managed to flag down a traffic cop. The cop steps right into the Infiniti’s path, holding his hand out like, well, a cop. Gecko slaloms around him and then floors it. In the blink of an eye, the Infiniti is halfway down the next block. Gecko grins into the mirror. The officer and the car owner scramble helplessly in his wake.

The smile disappears abruptly as his rearview changes. The door of the shop bursts open, and out stumble Reuben and his two cronies, weighed down with huge armloads of video games. One of them actually runs into the traffic cop, bowling him over in a spray of falling cases.

Gecko shifts into reverse. Now the acceleration is pressing on his chest, propelling him backward. Uh-oh. The light changes. A solid line of traffic is coming at him from the other direction. He presses on the gas, steering with one hand as he peers over his shoulder at the tons of metal hurtling toward him. The gap disappears in a heartbeat, split seconds to impact —

At the last instant, a tiny space opens up between the SUV and a van. Gecko swerves for it, threading the needle. The passenger mirror shatters as the van passes too close.

Gecko slams on the brakes, and Reuben and company pile in, raining disks all over the back seat. The Infiniti screams away.

His brother is the picture of outrage. “What are you doing, Gecko? You trying to get us busted?”

Gecko doesn’t respond. His not thinking kicks back in. He’s not thinking about the stolen car or what his brother has gotten him into again. From the first time Reuben saw him piloting a go-kart, Gecko’s fate was sealed. A getaway-driver-in-training since age nine.

The passengers are taking inventory of the haul, squabbling over who gets what, when they first hear the sirens.

Reuben slaps his brother in the back of the head. “Get us out of here, man!”


Gecko is already up to eighty on the avenue, weaving skillfully in and around traffic, using the sidewalk when necessary. Without telegraphing his move, he squeals into an underground parking garage, dutifully taking the ticket from the machine. He sails through the tight rows of parked cars as if taking a Sunday drive on the widest boulevard in town. The exit beckons dead ahead, leading onto a different avenue, this one southbound.

The Infiniti blasts through the wooden barrier, splintering it and sending the pieces flying. In an impressive burst of horsepower, the car streaks through four lanes of moving traffic and whips around the next corner.

That’s where it happens. An elderly nanny, pushing a baby carriage in front of her, steps off the curb to cross with the light. It’s a split-second decision, and Gecko makes it. He wrenches the steering wheel, and the speeding car brushes the back of the shocked nanny’s coat. The right front tire jumps the curb and plows up onto an old mattress leaning on a pile of trash. With the passenger side climbing and the driver’s side still on the road, the Infiniti flips over. For a heart-stopping moment they are airborne, hot video games bouncing around like Ping-Pong balls.

Gravity reverses. A teeth-jarring crash.

Everything goes dark.

From The Juvie Three. Copyright © 2008 by Gordon Korman. All rights reserved.

Attachment 2

Lyrics

Chorus
We’ve got the characters, the setting, and of course the plot
It’s the elements of fiction that I’m talking about

Verse I
In any decent story, you’ve got to have characters

The people in it, and they can be generic or

They can be complex, interesting, unique
Like a girl who walks on her hands and writes with her feet

The protagonist, the main character, the good guy


In most works of fiction, is usually opposed by
The antagonist, the bad guy, the villain
“But what about the other folks, are they just chillin’?”

Nope, not really, though some of them are static


So they’re flat, one-dimensional, nothing real dramatic
And people with the drama are called dynamic characters
Like if they start out calm and get hysterical

Or if they start out in love and end up not


That’s the motion and emotion that propels the plot
“What’s that?” Fear not, I’ll tell you in verse III
Here’s how it goes writing fictional prose

Chorus

Verse II
For the setting of a story, you need to know when it occurs
Like 7:30 in the morning on November the first
It doesn’t always have to be that specific
For instance, if the characters are using hieroglyphics

Then you know you’re in ancient times, not the present day


But if somebody’s driving up in a Chevrolet
You’re in the present or the future or the recent past
But there’s another setting question that we need to ask

And that’s “Where?” Location, it can be narrow


Like 57 Main Street, Rio de Janeiro
Or it can be broad, not specific at all
Like somewhere in Canada, north of Montreal

So there you have it, the time and the place


Even if it’s in the future or up in outer space
Make up a fundamental element of fiction: the setting
Now here’s the hook again so you don’t forget it

Chorus

Verse III

Now, the plot unfolds in five different phases

I’ll try to get you through it in just a few phrases
Take you all the way from beginning to end
But you’ve got to listen close or rewind again

Before action happens, we’ve got the exposition


Where the author can establish or begin a definition
Of the characters, the setting, and yes, the point of view
And once that’s all established we can move to phase two

The rising action. A period of conflict and crisis


This part is unpredictable, it’s full of surprises
So open up your eyes as wide as they can possibly be
After this we’re gonna hit phase three, which is the

Climax, the high point, a moment most intense


A turning point, a major culmination of events
After that, there isn’t really much more
We gotta end the story, let’s go to phase four

We’ve got the denouement, that’s what we call the falling action


And hopefully it leaves you with a sense of satisfaction
‘Cause phase five is the end, it’s called the resolution
Tying it all together, and we’ve come to the conclusion
Attachment 3

Characters, Setting, Plot
LYRICS WORD SCRAMBLE

Unscramble the words in (parentheses). Some answers have more than one word.



(To be used with lyrics to RRR song “Characters, Setting, Plot”)

Chorus

We've got the characters, the setting, and of course the plot

It's the elements of fiction that I'm talking about

(repeats)

Verse I

In any decent story, you've got to have 1. _________________ (ehtrcrsaca)

The people in it, and they can be generic or

They can be complex, interesting, unique

Like a girl who walks on her hands and writes with her feet

The 2. _______________ (sgonattprigo) the main character, the good guy

In most works of fiction, is usually opposed by

The 3. _________________ (gttonsanai), the bad guy, the villain

"But what about the other folks, are they just chillin'?"

Nope, not really, though some of them are 4. ________ (ctsiat)

So they're flat, one-dimensional, nothing real dramatic

And people with the drama are called 5. ________________(cymdian)

characters

Like if they start out calm and get hysterical

Or if they start out in love and end up not

That's the motion and emotion that propels the 6. _____ (ltpo)

"What's that?" Fear not, I'll tell you in verse III

Here's how it goes writing 7. ____________ _________ (ilifctona erspo) (2 words)


Chorus

We've got the characters, the setting, and of course the plot

It's the elements of fiction that I'm talking about

(repeats)

Page 2 of “Character, Setting, Plot” by Rhythm, Rhyme, Results | www.educationalrap.com



Verse II

For the 8. ___________ (ngttsei) of a story, you need to know 9. _____ (nehw)

it occurs

Like 7:30 in the morning on November the first

It doesn't always have to be that specific

For instance, if the characters are using hieroglyphics

Then you know you're in ancient times, not the present day

But if somebody's driving up in a Chevrolet

You're in the present or the future or the recent past

But there's another setting question that we need to ask

And that's “10._______ (eerwh)” Location, it can be narrow

Like 57 Main Street, Rio de Janeiro

Or it can be broad, not specific at all

Like somewhere in Canada, north of Montreal

So there you have it, the 11. __________ (meit) and

the 12. _________ (eaplc)

Even if it's in the future or up in outer space

Make up a fundamental element of fiction: the setting

Now here's the hook again so you don't forget it

Chorus

We've got the characters, the setting, and of course the plot

It's the elements of fiction that I'm talking about

(repeats)

Verse III

Now, the plot unfolds in 13. ______ (iefv) different phases

I'll try to get you through it in just a few phrases

Take you all the way from beginning to end

But youʼve got to listen close or rewind again

Before action happens, we've got the 14. ______________ (texspinooi)

Where the author can 15. ________________ (shbilstae) or begin a definition

Of the 16. __________________ (aaccthrser), the setting, and yes,

The 17._______________________ (onipt fo ewiv) (3 words)

Page 3 of “Character, Setting, Plot” by Rhythm, Rhyme, Results | www.educationalrap.com

And once that's all established we can move to phase two

The 18.__________________ (grsnii notiac) (2 words)

A period of 19. _____ __ ______ (ccflnoit dna ssiicr) (3 words)

This part is unpredictable, it's full of surprises

So open up your eyes as wide as they can possibly be

After this we're gonna hit phase three, which is the

20.__________ (xlmica), the high point, a moment most intense

A turning point,

a major 21. _______________ ___ _______( mucnltoiian fo seetnv) (3 words)

After that, there isn't really much more

We gotta end the story, let's go to phase four

We've got the 22. ___________________(nndeeetmou) that's what we call the

23. ___________ __________(llagfin notcia) (2 words)

And hopefully it leaves you with a sense of satisfaction

'Cause phase five is the end, it's called the 24. _________________ (olornituse)

Tying it all together, and we've come to the

25.__________________(innccoousl)


Chorus

We've got the characters, the setting, and of course the plot



It's the elements of fiction that I'm talking about

(repeats)

Attachment 4

Changes in the Wind
Assessment Prompt # 1

Characters, Setting and Plot


  1. After reading the excerpt of “The Juvie Three”, I have decided that:

  1. __________________ is the protagonist because this character_____________________________________________.




  1. __________________is the antagonist because this character______________________________________________.




  1. ____________________is/are the minor character(s) because_______________________________________________.



  1. After discussing my choices with my peers, I have decided that:



  1. __________________ is the protagonist because this character_____________________________________________.




  1. __________________is the antagonist because this character______________________________________________.




  1. ____________________is/are the minor character(s) because_______________________________________________.


  1. I changed/kept my answers because________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________.

Attachment 5


EXTENDED THINKING ASSIGNMENT
Choose one of the following R.A.F.T extensions and respond to the prompts from the character’s perspective.




ROLE



AUDIENCE



FORMAT



TOPIC

Blue Infiniti Sedan

Mechanic

How to manual

Repair the damage caused by the car

Gecko

Group of politicians

Top 10 reasons

The driving age should be lowered

The Bald Guy

Citizens of the town

A letter to the editor

Juvenile crime issues


Video store clerk

Citizens of the town

A letter to the editor

Juvenile crime issues

Attachment 6

Vocabulary trading cards: (students would have created their own as a launching activitiy)


\








Lesson plan format adapted from Learning-Focused Strategies. Thompson, M., Thompson, J. (2011).




:)


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page

:)