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*Early twentieth century female physician in Indiana

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*Early twentieth century female physician in Indiana.

Hamilton, Alice. Exploring the Dangerous Trades; the Autobiography of Alice



Hamilton, M.D. Boston, MA: Little, Brown, and Co., 1943.

An autobiography of Alice Hamilton. 433 pages.

Sicherman, Barbara, ed. Alice Hamilton, a Life in Letters. Cambridge, MA: Harvard

University Press, 1984.

A biography and compilation of the letters of Alice Hamilton. Includes bibliographical references. 460 pages.

Weber, Catherine E. Forrest. "Alice Hamilton, M.D.: Crusader Against Death on the

Job." Traces of Indiana and Midwestern History 7 no. 4 (Fall 1995): 28-39.

Biographical sketch of Alice Hamilton, who began her career in 1910. No footnotes.



Harper, Ida Husted

*Suffrage historian and official biographer of Susan B. Anthony from Terre Haute, Indiana.

Dehler, Susan Jacobs and Gary W. Daily. Index to the Writings of Ida Husted Harper:


the Terre Haute Years. Terre Haute, IN: Vigo County Pubic Library, 1988.

Indexes over three hundred articles written by Harper that are owned by the Vigo County Public Library. 43 pages.

Daily, Gary. Ida Husted Harper. Terre Haute, IN: Vigo County Public Library, 1988.

Short biography of Ida Husted Harper. Pamphlet.

Jones, Nancy Baker. "A Forgotten Feminist: the Early Writings of Ida Husted Harper."


Indiana Magazine of History 73 no. 2 (June 1977): 79-101.

Discusses Harper's feminist writings that appeared in newspapers while she lived in Terre Haute, Indiana. Footnotes included.


Miscellaneous

Barrows, Robert G. Albion Fellows Bacon : Indiana's Municipal Housekeeper.

Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2000.

A biography of Albion Fellows Bacon, who worked for housing reform in Indiana. Footnotes included. 229 pages.

Barrows, Robert G. "Indiana Bookshelf: Beauty for Ashes: Albion Fellows Bacon."

Traces of Indiana and Midwestern History 12 no. 1 (Winter 2000): 43-7.

An excerpt from the book-length biography of Albion Fellows Bacon, this article focuses on her transformation into a reformer, as detailed in her book, Beauty for Ashes.

Barrows, Robert G. "'The Homes of Indiana:' Albion Fellows Bacon and Housing

Reform Legislation, 1907-1917." Indiana Magazine of History 81 no. 4 (December 1985): 309-350.

A summary of Bacon's work between 1907 and 1917. Footnotes included.

Barrows, Robert G., Paul R. Hanson, and Peter J. Sehlinger. "Memorial Tribute to Emma

Lou Thornbrough." Indiana Magazine of History 91 no. 1 (March 1995): 2-3.

A remembrance of historian Emma Lou Thornbrough. No footnotes.

Bartholomew, H.S.K. "Virginia C. Meredith." Indiana Magazine of History 35 no. 1

(March 1939): 49-57.

Biographical sketch of Meredith, the first woman in the United States to give public lectures on agricultural matters. She was also an active clubwoman and the first female member of Purdue University's board of trustees. No footnotes.

Blakely, George T. "Esther Griffin White: An Awakener of Hoosier Potential." Indiana


Magazine of History 86 no. 3 (September 1990): 281-310.

A biographical sketch of journalist Esther Griffin White, a founding member of the Indiana Women's Press Club. Footnotes included.

Boewe, Mary. "Annie and Albion: Reformers of Riverville. Traces of Indiana and

Midwestern History 7 no. 1 (Winter 1995): 4-11.

Biographical sketches of sisters Albion Fellows Bacon and Annie Fellows Johnson, both of whom crusaded for house reform. Annie also penned the popular Little Colonel stories. Suggested readings but no footnotes.

Boomhower, Ray. "Caroline Dunn: An Appreciation." Indiana Magazine of History 91

no. 2 (January 1995): 154-7.

A short remembrance of Caroline Dunn, a librarian at the Indiana Historical

Society.


Carson, Mina J. "Agnes Hamilton of Fort Wayne: the Education of a Christian

Settlement Worker." Indiana Magazine of History 80 no. 1 (March 1984): 1-34.

A biographical sketch of Agnes Hamilton, a settlement house worker. Footnotes included.

Crawford, Mary M., ed. "Mrs. Lydia B. Bacon's Journal, 1811-1812." Indiana Magazine



of History 40 no. 4 (Dec 1944): 367-386.

Part 1 of a reprint of selected diary entries of Mrs. Lydia B. Bacon, who lived in Vincennes, IN for one year between 1811-1812 and kept a diary of her experiences.

Crawford, Mary M., ed. "Mrs. Lydia B. Bacon's Journal, 1811-1812." Indiana Magazine

of History 41 no. 4 (March 1945): 59-79.

Part 2 of Mrs. Lydia B. Bacon's diary entries.

Dahmen, Corrine Schenck. "Sallie." Indiana Magazine of History 29 no. 1 (March

1933): 40-3.

Schenck reminisces about her family's hired cook, Sallie, providing details about the work of a hired servant in turn-of-the-century Indiana. No footnotes.

Danna, Mrs. A.V. "Mary Wright, Pioneer Musician of Switzerland County." Indiana


Magazine of History 24 no. 1 (March 1928): 26-33.

Mrs. Danna offers a short (8 page) biographical sketch of Mary Wright, an accomplished pianist who resided in Switzerland County. Footnotes provide additional comments, but do not divulge sources.

Darbee, Leigh. "Focus: Enlightened Woman." Traces of Indiana and Midwestern

History 12 no. 1 (Winter 2000): 41-2.

A brief overview of Enlightened Woman, a book written by M. Elna W. Haverfield, M.D., in 1882. Haverfield received her medical training from the Central College of Physicians and Surgeons in Indianapolis.

Darbee, Leigh and Wilma L. Gibbs. "Books and Articles by Emma Lou Thornbrough."

Indiana Magazine of History 91 no. 1 (March 1995): 16-17.

A list of works written by Thornbrough.

Fadely, James Philip. "Desperate Hope: the Story of Florence Taggart." Traces of

Indiana and Midwestern History 6 no. 4 (Fall 1994): 4-11.

The story of the life and death of Florence Taggart, the daughter of Indianapolis politician and mayor Thomas Taggart, who died in a yacht accident. No footnotes or suggested readings.

Flanagan, John T. "The Fiction of Jessamyn West." Indiana Magazine of History 67 no.

4 (December 1971): 299-316.

A biographical sketch of writer Jessamyn West. Footnotes included.

"Honoring a Long-Standing Contributor: Julie Le Clerc Knox." Indiana Magazine of



History 51 no. 1 (March 1955): 55-8.

A biographical sketch of a long-time contributor to the Indiana Magazine of History. No footnotes.

Hoover, Dwight W. "Daisy Douglas Barr: From Quaker to Klan "Kluckeress." Indiana


Magazine of History 87 no. 2 (June 1991)" 171-210.

A biographical sketch of Barr, who first became famous in Muncie as a prohibitionist and later as a member of the KKK. Footnotes included.

Hoppe, David. "Child of the Northwest Wind: Alice Gray & Diana of the Dunes."

Traces of Indiana and Midwestern History 9 no. 2 (Spring 1997): 22-31.

A biographical sketch of Alice Gray, who lived a life of outdoor adventure at Indiana's dunes. Suggested readings but no footnotes.

Jordan, Philip D. "The Death of Nancy Hanks Lincoln." Indiana Magazine of History 40

no. 2 (June 1944): 103-110.

An account of the death of Abraham Lincoln's mother from milk sickness. No footnotes.

Knox, Julie Le Clerc. "I Remember my Grandmother." Indiana Magazine of History 34

no. 2 (June 1938): 175-187.

A memoir of Knox's grandmother.

Kriebel, Robert C. Where the Saints Have Trod: the Life of Helen Gougar. West

Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press, 1985.

A biography of temperance reformer and suffragette Helen Gougar. Includes bibliographical references. 238 pages.

Lane, James B. "Triumph over travail: the Katherine Hyndman Story." Traces of


Indiana and Midwestern History 18 no. 1 (Winter 2006): 36-41.

Recounts the story of Katherine Hyndman, a Croatian immigrant residing in Gary, Indiana, who was jailed in October 1952 because of her ties to the Communist party. No footnotes.

Lasselle, Charles B. "Judge Charles B. Lasselle's Notes on Alice of Old Vincennes."


Indiana Magazine of History 4 no. 2 (June 1908): 81-5.

In this five page article, Laselle describes the character of Alice depicted in Maurice Thompson's story, Alice of Old Vincennes. Laselle gives a short biographical sketch of Mary Shannon, the girl whose story inspired Thompson's fictional Alice. Shannon was captured by Indians, but managed to escape to Vincennes, where her story became a local legend. Footnotes provide additional comments, but do not divulge sources.

Johnson, Mary Coffin and Rhoda M. Coffin. Rhoda M. Coffin: Her Reminiscences,

Addresses, Papers, and Ancestry. NY: Grafton, 1910.

A compilation of documents written by Rhoda Coffin, a Richmond Quaker who was active in reform activities. 291 pages.

Kimbrough, David L. "Malinda Clark Slawson Pugh." Indiana Magazine of History 94

no. 1 (March 1998): 29-38

A biographical sketch of a woman who died in childbirth. Footnotes included.

Madison, James H. "Caroline Dunn: A Youthful Memory." Indiana Magazine of


History 91 no. 2 (January 1995): 58.

A short remembrance of Caroline Dunn, a librarian at the Indiana Historical Society. No footnotes.

Madison, James H. "Flossie Bailey: 'What a Woman!'" Traces of Indiana and Midwestern History 12 no. 1 (Winter 2000): 23-7.

A biographical sketch of Flossie Bailey, an African American woman in Marion, IN, who began a crusade for civil rights after the notorious Marion lynchings. No footnotes.

Moore, Anne Chieko. Caroline Lavinia Scott Harrison. New York: Nova History

Publication, 2005.

A biography of Caroline Lavinia Scott Harrison, wife of president Benjamin Harrison. Includes bibliographical references. 75 pages.

Moses, Wilson J. "Emma Lou Thornbrough's Place in American Historiography."


Indiana Magazine of History 91 no. 1 (March 1995): 4-13.

A discussion of Thornbrough's contributions to the field of history. No footnotes.

Peyser, Joseph L. "The Fall and Rise of Therese Catin: A Portrait from Indiana's French

and Canadian History." Indiana Magazine of History 91 no. 4 (December 1995): 361-79.

A biographical sketch of Catin, a businesswoman in Montreal, born in 1686, who conducted many business ventures in the Great Lakes region.

Pierce, Richard B. "Emma Lou Thornbrough: Mentor and Teacher." Indiana Magazine



of History 91 no. 1 (March 1995): 14-15.

A short sketch of historian Emma Lou Thornbrough. No footnotes.

Price, Nelson. "A Woman at the Brickyard: Bettie Cadou and the Indianapolis Motor

Speedway." Traces of Indiana and Midwestern History 19 no. 2 (Spring 2007): 4-9.

In May 1971, Betty Cadou, an Indianapolis journalist, became the first woman to gain the necessary permission to access the pits and garages at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Price discusses Cadou's efforts to open the race track to women. Offers suggested readings but no footnotes.

Rafert, Stewart. "Ozahshinquck: A Miami Woman's Life." Traces of Indiana and



Midwestern History 4 no. 2 (Spring 1992): 4-11.

A biographical sketch of Ozahshinquck, the daughter of Frances Slocum. Suggested readings but no footnotes.

Ruegamer, Lana. "Gayle Thornbrough and the Indiana Historical Society." Indiana

Magazine of History 80 no. 3 (September 1984): 271-300.

A biographical sketch of Thornbrough, an Indiana Historical Society staff member, on occasion of her retirement.

Ruegamer, Lana. "Gayle Thornbrough, 1914-1999." Indiana Magazine of History 96

no. 1 (March 2000): 1-4.

A biographical sketch of an early Indiana Historical Society staff member. Footnotes provided.

Ruegamer, Lana. "Dorothy Lois Riker, 1904-1994: Reflection on Indiana History,

Historical Editing, and Women in the Historical Professions." Indiana Magazine of History 91 no. 3 (September 1995): 246-61.

A biographical sketch of Riker, who was a historian and editor for the Indiana Historical Bureau and the Indiana Historical Society. Footnotes included.

Sferrazza, Carl. "Anna Symmes Harrison: First Lady of the West." Traces of Indiana


and Midwestern History 2 no. 4 (Fall 1990): 22-7.

Biographical sketch of the wife of William Henry Harrison. Suggested readings but no footnotes.

Swain, Ellen D. "From Benevolence to Reform: the Expanding Career of Mrs. Rhoda M.

Coffin." Indiana Magazine of History 97 no. 3 (September 2001): 190-217

A biographical sketch of the Quaker humanitarian and reformer. Footnotes included.

Taylor, Wilma Rugh. Sister of the Solid Rock: Edna Mae Barnes Martin and the East



Side Christian Center. Indianapolis, IN: Indiana Historical Society Press, 2002.

A biography of Edna Mae Barnes Martin, an activist on Indianapolis's East Side, who started a center for youth in the African American community. Includes bibliographical sources. 198 pages.

Taylor, Wilma Rugh. "Solid Faith in a Shaky House: From Sister of the Solid Rock:

Edna Mae Barnes and the East Side Christian Center." Traces of Indiana and Midwestern History 14 no. 4 (Fall 2002): 14-23.

An excerpt from her book-length biography about Barnes.

Vogelgesang, Susan. "Zerelda Wallace: Indiana's Conservative Radical." Traces of

Indiana and Midwestern History 4 no. 3 (Summer 1992): 34-41.

Biographical sketch of Zerelda Wallace, a crusader for temperance and women's rights. Suggested readings, but no footnotes.

Walker, Janet R. and Richard W. Burkhardt. Eliza Julia Flower: Letters of an English

Gentlewoman: Life on the Illinois-Indiana Frontier, 1817-1861. Muncie, IN:

Ball State University, 1991.

A biography and compilation of correspondence of Eliza Julia Flower. Includes bibliographical references. 173 pages.

Weber, Catherine E. Forrest. "Exploring Ancient Worlds: The Life of Mary Hamilton

Swindler." Traces of Indiana and Midwestern History 17 no. 2 (Spring 2005): 4-11.

A biography of Mary Hamilton Swindler, a nationally recognized classical archaeologist from Bloomington. No footnotes.

Sewall, May Wright

*Indianapolis educator, suffragette, peace activist, and clubwoman.

Boomhower, Ray E. But I do Clamor: May Wright Sewall, A Life, 1844-1920.

Zionsville, IN: Guild Press of Indiana, 2001.

A book-length biography of May Wright Sewall. Includes full citations. 199 pages.


Boomhower, Ray E. "Indiana Bookshelf: 'The Last Enemy is Destroyed': May Wright

Sewall and Neither Dead Nor Sleeping." Traces of Indiana and Midwestern History 14 no. 2 (Spring 2002): 26-33.

Focuses on Sewall's book about her communications with her dead husband Theodore. No footnotes or suggested readings.

Garlin, Anna. The Council Idea: a Chronicle of its Prophets and a Tribute to May



Wright Sewall, Architect of its Form and Builder of its Method of Work. New York, NY: National Council of Women, 1930.

Sewall's many accomplishments included the her work to create the International Council of Women. Besides a short biography, Garlin provides an account of the formation and work of the council. 55 pages.

Sewall, May Wright. Neither Dead Nor Sleeping. Indianapolis, IN: The Bobbs-Merrill

Company, 1920.

Sewall's account of her communications with her dead husband, Theodore.

Stephens, Jane. "May Wright Sewall: an Indiana Reformer." Indiana Magazine of


History 78 no. 4 (December 1982): 273-??

A biographical sketch of Sewall. Includes footnotes.


Slocum, Frances

* Frances Slocum was captured by Indians as a young girl, raised as a member of the tribe, and later married a native named Shepoconah and moved to Indiana

Dye, Kitty. Maconaquah's Story: the Saga of Frances Slocum. Port Clinton, OH:

LeClere Pub., 2000.

A biography of Frances Slocum. Includes bibliographical references. 172 pages.

G. S. C., "Sketch of Frances Slocum." Indiana Magazine of History 1 no. 3 (Third

Quarter 1905): 118-122.

This five-page article provides a brief biographical sketch of Frances Slocum. No footnotes.

Meginness, John Franklin. Biography of Frances Slocum, the Lost Sister of Wyoming.

Reprint, New York: Arno Press, 1974, 1891.

A reprint of an early biography of France Slocum. Includes some bibliographical references. 238 pages.

Slocum, Charles Elihu. History of Frances Slocum, the Captive: a Civilized Heredity vs.

a Savage, and Later Barbarous Environment. Defiance, OH: privately printed, 1908.

A reminiscence written by Slocum's brother. 48 pages.

Winter, George. "Winter's Description of Frances Slocum." Indiana Magazine of

History 1 no. 3 (Third Quarter 1905): 115-118.

Winter was a pioneer artist in Indiana. He painted a portrait of Frances Slocum. This issue of the Indiana Magazine of History provides a reprint of a letter that he had written offering a description of Slocum. No footnotes.

Wright, Caleb E. Frances Slocum: the Lost Sister. A Poem. Wilkes-Barre, PA: R. Baur

& Son, 1889.

An epic poem detailing the life of Frances Slocum. 43 pages.

Walker, Madam C. J.

*Successful entrepreneur who began a line of hair care products for African American women.

Bundles, A'Lelia Perry. On Her Own Ground: the Life and Times of Madam C. J.



Walker. New York: Washington Square Press, 2002.

A biography of Madam C. J. Walker. Includes bibliographical references. 415 pages.

Higbee, Mark David. "W.E.B. DuBois, F.B. Ransom, the Madame Walker Company,

and Black Business Leadership in the 1930s." Indiana Magazine of History 89 no. 2 (June 1995): 101-24.

Included in this larger discussion of African American businesses is a biographical sketch of Madame C. J. Walker. Footnotes included.

Latham, Charles Jr. "Madam C. J. Walker & Company." Traces of Indiana and



Midwestern History 1 no. 3 (Summer 1989): 28-36.

A biographical sketch of Walker. Offers suggestions for further reading, but no footnotes.

Lowry, Beverly. Her Dream of Dreams: the Rise and Triumph of Madam C. J. Walker.

New York: Vintage Books, 2004.

Biography of Walker. Includes bibliographical references. 481 pages.
Wright, Frances

*Frances Wright was a social reformer and crusader for women's rights. She lived in Robert Dale Owen's utopian community in New Harmony, Indiana for several years in the 1820s. Wright is considered to be Indiana's first feminist, and worked to advance the rights of women in Indiana.

Bartlett, Elizabeth Ann. Liberty, Equality, Sorority: the Origins and Interpretation of


American Feminist Thought: Frances Wright, Sarah-Grimke, and Margaret Fuller. Brooklyn, NY: Carlson Publishing, 1994.

Includes a biographical sketch of Frances Wright and a discussion of her viewpoints and work for women's rights. Includes bibliographical references. 184 pages.

Elliot, Helen. "Frances Wright's Experiment with Negro Emancipation." Indiana

Magazine of History 35 no. 2 (June 1939): 141-157.

A discussion of Frances Wright's work for the emancipation of slaves. Footnotes provided.

Lane, Margaret. Frances Wright and the "Great Experiment." Totowa, NJ: Rowman &

Littlefield, 1972.

A short biography of Frances Wright. 50 pages.

Morris, Celia. Fanny Wright: Rebel in America. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University

Press, 1984.

A biography of Frances Wright. Includes bibliographical references. 337 pages. Reprinted in 1992 by the University of Illinois Press.

Perkins, Alice J. G. and Theresa Wolfson. Frances Wright, Free Enquirer: the Study of a

Temperament. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1939.

A biography of Frances Wright. Includes bibliographical references. 393 pages. Reprinted in 1972 by Porcupine Press.

Waterman, William Randall. Frances Wright. New York: Columbia University, 1924.

A biography of Frances Wright. Includes bibliographical references. 267 pages. Reprinted in 1967 by AMS Press.



General History

Ashendel, Anita. "'Woman as Force' in Indiana History. Traces of Indiana and


Midwestern History 12 no. 1 (Winter 2000): 5-15.

A general history of women in Indiana with suggested readings. No footnotes.

Ashendel, Anita. "Fabricating Independence: Industrial Labor in Antebellum Indiana."

Michigan History Review 23 (February 1997): 1-24.

Discusses women wage earners in Indiana. Includes bibliographical references.

Gabin, Nancy. "Fallow Yet Fertile: the Field of Indiana Women's History." Indiana

Magazine of History 96 no. 3 (September 2000): 213-250.

An overview of the historiography of Indiana women's history. Footnotes included.

Hine, Darlene Clark. When the Truth is Told : a History of Black Women's Culture and

Community in Indiana, 1875-1950. Indianapolis, IN: National Council of Negro

Women, Indianapolis Section, 1981.

Discusses the lives and activities of African American women in Indiana. Includes bibliographical references. 90 pages.

Miller, Kathy K. Rural Women's Work and Role in Community Building and Institution



Building in Indiana from 1900-1980. Thesis, PhD, Purdue University, 1997.

An analysis of rural women's activity in Indiana. Includes bibliographical references. 209 pages.

Thornbrough, Emma Lou. "The History of Black Women in Indiana." Wilma Gibbs, ed.

Indiana's African-American Heritage: Essays from Black History News & Notes. Indianapolis, IN: Indiana Historical Society, 1993.

A short sketch of the accomplishments of African American women in Indiana, first printed in Black History News and Notes 13 May 1983 (4-8) and 14 August 1983 (4-7).


Law/Lawyers
Barteau, Betty. "Thirty Years of the Journey of Indiana's Women Judges, 1964-1994."

Indiana Law Review 30 no. 1 (1997): 43-202.

An overview of women in the legal profession and the judiciary in Indiana. Also offers a comparison of the common characteristics shared by Indiana's women judges between 1964 and 1994. Footnotes provided.

Farmer, James E. "Women in the Law: A Centennial Legacy of Antoinette Dakin

Leach." Res Gestae 37 (September 1993): 106-11.

A biographical sketch of Leach, whose 1893 petition to the Supreme Court guaranteed women in Indiana the right to practice law. Also discusses two earlier female lawyers in the state. No footnotes.

Seager, Sharon Hannum. "A Century of Change: Indiana's Women Lawyers." Traces of


Indiana and Midwestern History 15 no. 3 (Summer 2003): 14-18.

A history of women in law in Indiana. Provides suggested readings but no footnotes.

Shepard, Randall T. Indiana's First 100 Women Attorneys. Indianapolis, IN: Indiana

State Bar Association, 2000.

Short biographical sketches of early female Indiana attorneys.

Shields, Vivian Sue and Suzanne Melanie Buchko. "Antoinette Dakin Leach: A Woman

Before the Bar." Valparaiso University Law Review 28 (Summer 1994): 1189-230.

Trained in law, Antoinette Dakin Leach challenged Indiana's constitution that barred women from practicing as lawyers, and won her case, thus opening the practice of law to women in Indiana. This article provides a biographical sketch with footnotes.

Spann, Edward K. "Indiana's First Woman in Congress: Virginia E. Jencks and the New

Deal, 1932-1938." Indiana Magazine of History 92 no. 3 (September 1996): 235-53.

A summary of Jenck's activity in the 1930s. Footnotes included.


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