Adobe Captivate Slide 1 Part 2



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Adobe Captivate




Slide 1 - Part 2


Slide notes

Welcome to Front-end Development for Journalists Part 2 – HTML Basics. In this module, you'll learn what HTML is, and the basics about reading and editing HTML. It is highly recommended that you take Front-end Development for Journalists Part 1 before beginning this module. By the end of this module you will have learned how to edit HTML documents, and you'll be familiar with several basic HTML tags.

Welcome to part 1 of Front-end development for journalists.

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Front-end Development for Journalists

Part 2

HTML Basics



[Slide 2 has been are omitted for this text-based alternative]

Slide 3 - What is HTML?


Slide notes

HTML stands for Hypertext Markup Language. Hypertext refers to text that has additional capabilities such as linking to other documents, and adding images. So Hypertext Markup Language is a system for structuring those 'hyper' capabilities. It tells a web browser which parts of a page should behave as links,where to display images, and how to distinguish between elements like paragraphs and headings.

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What is HTML?


  • Hyper Text Markup Language

  • Hyper Text = beyond text

Resources

Learn to Code for Free


W3C schools has a reasonably accessible reference of html tags

and css properties

A great blog post with some advice journalists learning to code:
Software Links:


  • Notepad ++

  • Textwrangler

  • Dreamweaver

  • Wordpress

Slide 4 - HTML Examples


Slide notes

When editing HTML, it is usually viewed as plain text.

A browser translates that text into what you see on a web page.


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HTML Code as text
HTML in the web browser

Slide 5 - Software For Editing HTML


Slide notes

HTML is plain text.

This means you can edit it on any computer, Mac or PC, as long as you have a text editor installed.


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Software for editing HTML

Slide 6 - Free Text Editors

Slide notes

Windows computers come with a plain text editor installed, called Notepad. It will do the job, but there are other text editors that make things a bit easier. Notepad ++ is a free text editor for Windows that displays your HTML tags in different colours. This feature, called syntax highlighting, makes it easier to read HTML. TextWrangler is a free text editor for Mac OS. Like Notepad ++, it uses syntax highlighting to display HTML tags in different colours. When saving an HTML file from a plain text editor, make sure to put '.html' at the end of the filename. For example 'index.html'.

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Saving HTML files:

Always end filenames with .html E.g. “index.html” or “home.html”

Notepad (Windows)

Notepad++ (Windows)

TextWrangler (Mac OS)

Slide 7 - WYSIWYG


Slide notes

As well as plain text editors, you can edit HTML using WYSIWYG editors. WYSIWYG stands for 'What You See Is What You Get'. These editors allow you to switch between viewing HTML as text, and viewing the rendered website. This means you can use WYSIWYG editors to edit HTML without actually having to look at the HTML code itself – a great convenience. One example of WYSIWYG editors is Adobe’s Dreamweaver software. Many blogging tools and content management systems also include WYSIWYG editors. For example, WordPress, a popular blogging platform, allows you to edit HTML through a visual editor. One example of WYSIWYG editors is Adobe's Dreamweaver software.

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WordPress

Adobe Dreamweaver

WYSIWYG

(What You See Is What You Get)



Slide 8 - Editor Summary


Slide notes

Although WYSIWYG is convenient it is still useful to be able to read basic HTML, since you'll have an easier time fixing problems.No matter what software you use to edit HTML, you can view the results in any web browser – Firefox, Chrome, Internet Explorer, or Safari,or any other. Just open the HTML file in your browser of choice and you'll see the results. If you want to access any of these tools, click on 'Resources', then choose the tool you want to use.
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Plain text editors



  • Notepad (Windows)

  • Notepad ++ (Windows)

  • TextWrangler (Mac)

WYSIWYG editors (What you see is what you get)




Slide 9 - HTML Tags


Slide notes

HTML code is made up of 'tags'. Tags are the structural building blocks of web pages. Tags are always marked with angle brackets. Most of the time, tags are containers for content. For example, you can create paragraphs by using P tags. Notice that when we use HTML tags as containers we use a forward slash in the closing tag. So a paragraph opens with a P and closes with a forward slash P. The text of each paragraph goes in between those tags.

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HTML tags

< >

This is a paragraph.


Slide 10 - Heading Tags


Slide notes

Let's look at a few different HTML tags. First, we can create headings using the H1 tag. H1 stands for heading level 1 – the largest sized heading. You can create smaller headings by using H2, H3, H4, H5, and H6. These are useful for article titles and section headings.

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Heading tags -

,

...

CODE


Heading level 1



Heading level 2



Heading level 3



Heading level 4



Heading level 5


Heading level 6

RESULT

Heading level 1

Heading level 2

Heading level 3

Heading level 4

Heading level 5

Heading level 6

Slide 11 - Link Tags


Slide notes

The A tag is used to create links to other webpages. For creating links, the A tag always includes an attribute called HREF, which is where you enter the URL you want to link to. For example, to link to Google's homepage, you would use <a href="http://www.google.ca">, and you'd close the A tag (</a>). In between the opening and closing A tag, type the text you want to turn into a link.
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Link tags -

CODE

Click here to visit Google.


RESULT

Click here to visit Google.



Slide 12 - Image Tags


Slide notes

The IMG tag is used to insert images. Unlike most other tags, it is not a container, so there is no closing an tag. Similar to how you use the HREF, IMG tags use the SRC attribute to choose which image will be displayed. The SRC attribute works by pointing to the location of an image file. SRC is a shortened form of 'source'. If your HTML and image file are in the same folder, you can simply type the name of the image file. If you are using an image hosted elsewhere on the web, you will have to enter the full URL for that image, including HTTP.

Text Captions

Image tags -

CODE






RESULT


[image of camel]

Slide 13 - Inline Frame Tags

Slide notes

Journalists may often find themselves wanting to insert various types of media from other websites. For examples, look to videos from YouTube, or maps from Google Maps, or various types of interactive features. This is usually accomplished using an IFRAME which stands for 'inline frame.' Sites like YouTube and Google usually provide IFRAME code for you. For example, when you click 'share' on a YouTube video, you can copy and paste IFRAME code from the 'Embed' tab. This is convenient because you don't usually need to modify the code. But let's look quickly at the attributes used here. First, width and height define the size of the IFRAME in pixels. You can change these sizes.Next, the SRC attribute tells the IFRAME what content to display here. If making an IFRAME from scratch, you can use the URL from any website. Example: switch SRC to 'google.ca'. This means you can use IFRAMEsto insert all kinds of content, including maps or other interactive media.

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CODE

inline frame tags -


RESULT

[location in Google Maps]



Slide 14 - Quiz 1

Slide notes

Let's review what you've learned with a short quiz. Look at the news story on the left. Various sections will be highlighted in yellow. Please choose the HTML code that matches the highlighted section. When you're ready to begin, click NEXT.

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Camel joyride ends safely

By Art Gunther

Cory the camel’s joyride through Toronto has ended safely, and the camel has been returned to his home in the zoo.

The camel escaped the Toronto Zoo during a brief power outage, and hot-wired a pickup truck from the Zoo’s parking lot.

The camel tweeted about his hijinks as he drove through downtown Toronto. Click to view the camel’s Twitter account.

It is unknown how the camel learned to operate a car. Let’s Review.


Slide 15 - Quiz 2


Slide notes

[The quiz cannot be replicated in a text alternative. Please contact the instructor for an alternative]
[Slides 15-20 have been are omitted for this text-based alternative]

Slide 21 - Good Work!

Slide notes

Good work completing Part 2 of Front-end Development for Journalists.

In this section you learned how to read and write basic HTML -enough to get you a pretty long way!

In Part 3, you'll learn about using CSS to control the visual style of your web content.

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Good Work!


Slide 22 - Congratulations!


Slide notes

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You have now completed Front-end Development for Journalists Part 2. You may now print a certificate of completion you should keep for your records.
Please enter your name into the space below so we can personalize your certificate.
Congratulations!
Your name:

Slide 23 - Certificate of Completion


Slide notes

[Screenshot of a blank Certificate of Completion]

Slide 24 - Credits


Slide notes

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Credits
Funding for this project was provided by the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU) 2014-2015 Shared Online Course Fund.

Slide 25 - Credits


Slide notes

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Credits

Gavin Adamson, Assistant Professor, School of Journalism, Ryerson University

Jack Jamieson, PhD Student, Faculty of Information, University of Toronto

Angela Glover, News Media Production Specialist, Ryerson University

Kyle Mackie Consulting Ltd & Park Education, Content Support

Marybeth Burriss and Vince Cifani, Instructional Designers, Digital Educational Strategies, G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education, Ryerson University

Nancy Walton, e-learning Support, Director, Office of e-learning, Ryerson University



© 2015 Gavin Adamson, Ryerson University. Spreadsheets for Journalists is made available for public use under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND) license.

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