Analyzing “Rendered New” Archetypes overview



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Analyzing “Rendered New” Archetypes


OVERVIEW

To further our study of archetypes and the “rendered new” concept, you will work to identify and analyze various archetypes in a fairy tale and how they have been rendered new in an alternative/fractured version. You can choose from any of the text/films we have studied in this unit. After completing all of the following steps, you will then create a compare and contrast essay in which you will compare and contrast the similarities and differences of two versions of the same Fairy Tale analyzing the various archetypal characters, settings and events.


YOUR INITIAL TASK


  1. Read and annotate your fairy tale




  1. After your initial reading of your story, reread it. During the second reading of the text, identify and thoroughly analyze all archetypal people and places within it.



  1. Create a thorough plot summary of the story. Be sure to include all major characters and details.




  1. Research an alternate version of your fairy tale (Disney, masterpiece theatre, children’s books etc…). Investigate online sources or plan a time to watch the movie.




    1. Make a list comparing and contrasting the textual version of the fairy tale to the “Alternate Version” of the fairy tale. Be sure to compare and contrast the plot as well as the characters and archetypes in the text and film.




  1. Present your fairy tale findings in a compare and contrast essay.


YOUR ESSAY
The purpose of your essay is to present your findings to the class to share what you learned. All essays must include the following:


  1. The title and author of your fairy tale and the original date of publication





  1. Your summary of the fairy tale’s plot.




  1. A detailed explanation of the various archetypes in your fairy tale.




  1. At least three similarities and three differences between the “Alternate Version” of your fairy tale and the original version of your fairy tale.




  1. A “Works Cited” page at the end of your essay including all of the sources you used in your research




    1. Instructions on citations will be given to you

A Project Guide Name__________

My Fairy Tale:
Title: ________________________________Author_________________
Character List from Fairy Tale: Archetypal Role:


  1. _______________________________________ ____________________________________




  1. _______________________________________ ____________________________________




  1. _______________________________________ ____________________________________




  1. _______________________________________ ____________________________________




  1. _______________________________________ ____________________________________

Compare and Contrast “Alternate Version” to Original Version of Fairy Tale: Consider Theme, characters, setting, plot events



SIMILARITIES (how the “Alternate version” does not change




Alternate Version” of Fairy Tale

Original Version of Fairy Tale






1.




2.

2.




3.

3.




DIFFERENCES (how the “Alternate version” is “rendered new”)

Alternate Version” of Fairy Tale

Original Version of Fairy Tale



1.

2.


2.

3.

3.


1. Choose the three main points of comparison (consider Archetypes, themes, setting, and plot etc…)
TOPIC:

Comparison Point 1:

Comparison Point 2:

Comparison Point 3:


2. Begin with a great introduction.
DO NOTE USE BAD BEGINNINGS: DO NOT USE Weak Leads

A. Using a lame beginning

1. This paper is about two stories I read.

2. I am writing to tell you…

B. Writing vague sentences

Example: Fishing and hunting. Are they good or bad? That's what this paper is going to talk about.

There are so many views of why hunting is right. Sometimes it may be right, and

sometimes it may be wrong. It’s always better to be right than wrong. Are you with me?


USE BETTER BEGINNINGS: Strong leads
The “Anecdote” Lead

Anecdote—You begin by telling a brief, true story that relates to your thesis.

Example: “Tyler Hagen did the right thing. When a friend asked the 13-year-old to dispose of a dime bag of marijuana, Tyler took the pot to his parents, who contacted the local sheriff to retrieve the grass. Tyler did exactly what he should have done. However, when school authorities learned Tyler’s hand had touched reefer while his feet were on school property, they suspended him for five days under the district’s strict new zero-tolerance policy.”

The “Statistics” Lead

Statistics—You begin by quoting startling or interesting numbers related to your thesis.
Example: “In 1994, Network Solutions, the web’s largest distributor of Internet addresses, assigned 24,000 Internet addresses. In 1998, that number had risen to 1.9 million. In only four years Internet expansion exploded, and it continues to grow to this day.”
The “Question” Lead

Question—You being by asking an important question(s) that you then answer in the text of your essay.
Example: “How much freedom do Americans really have? Are we really entitled, as the Constitution says, to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness? What about freedom of speech and religion? You might think Americans have a great deal of freedom, but you’d be wrong. Everyday federal and local politicians pass laws restricting the freedom of Americans, and often we don’t even know they’re doing it.”
The “Quote” Lead

Quote—You begin with a famous or compelling quote that relates to your thesis.
Example: “The ancient Greek philosopher Plato said, ‘The unexamined life is not worth living.’ However, if Plato were alive today, and saw the rash of self-help books and people trying to solve their problems on national television, he may decide that people have been examining their lives long enough—and that perhaps it’s time people started living their lives instead.”
The “What If” Lead

What If?—You begin by having your readers imagine themselves in a situation that relates to your thesis.

Example: “Imagine a nice young man moves in next door to you. He seems clean-cut and clearly enjoys being around children. Your daughter likes to go over to the man’s house after school to play with his dog. Now imagine this nice young man is actually a convicted child molester. Wouldn’t you want to know this? Megan’s Law, which requires all convicted child molesters to notify local police when they move into a new area, is an important element in protecting our children.”

You can also do a combination of Strategies such as the above example that has the “what if” and the “rhetorical question”.
Your Introduction should catch your reader’s attention, present the topic of your comparison essay to your readers, and give just enough information to make them want to continue reading the rest of it. End your Introduction with a Strong Thesis. Be sure that the thesis has at least three or more points for comparison (for example: the following thesis states that the elements of character, setting and plot will be contrasted, while the similarity that will be compared is the archetypal theme.) These points can be compared point by point in four paragraphs or in block using eight separate paragraphs.
3. Write a lead for your compare and contrast essay. It’s easy. Use an anecdote, a statistic, a question, a quote, a what if lead, etc…


4. Write a Thesis for a compare and contrast essay. It’s easy. Be sure to use key vocabulary and

introduce your key points of comparison for the essay. Be assertive!
Example Thesis: Both the story of “King Midas” and the story of the “Emperor’s New Groove” have many similarities; however they are also very different. While the character’s, setting and experiences differ, it is still just a new rendition of the same old theme, “sometimes lessons are learned the hard way”.


5. STRONG SUPPORTING PARAGRAPHS: Powerful paragraphs

Next, determine the points for your supporting paragraphs using the comparison chart. Then rough draft your supporting paragraphs using the transitions provided and the chart as a guide. It’s easy. Use either the point by point or block method. Remember we are Writing Powerful Paragraphs focusing on “topic sentences”, “unity”, “coherence” and “transitions”, as well as the use of QUOTED Examples with Commentary. Your insight Matters!

Block outline sample: (remember this format is longer and requires the use of transitions in each paragraph to signify if the detail being given is a similarity or difference. The “other” story can only be mentioned to clarify this. For example in the Emperor paragraph you might begin with “Unlike the character in Midas”, or “Similarly to the theme in Midas”.)
Block Format


  1. Introduction:

  1. Begin with a sentence that will catch the reader’s interest. Refer to Lead Examples for idea

  2. Then name the two subjects and say they are very similar, very different or have many important (or interesting) similarities and differences.

  3. Write a Thesis that asserts the main points of comparison (it is often best to use as least three topics of comparison to allow for three strong comparison points)

  1. Paragraphs 2

  1. The next paragraph(s) describe features of the first text/film only. This is to give a point of reference for the comparison.

  2. Be sure to include examples with quotes and parenthetical citations to support analysis.

  3. Do NOT MENTION (include analysis of) the second text/film

  1. Paragraphs 3

    1. The next paragraph MUST begin with a transition showing you are comparing the similarities of the second text/film to the first.

    2. For each comparison, use compare/contrast cue words such as like, similar to, also, like, etc.

    3. Address Only the Similarities of the second text/film to the first text/film.
    4. Be sure to include examples with quotes and parenthetical citation to support the analysis (proving the similarities and differences that exist in the second text/film).


  2. Paragraph 4

    1. The next paragraph MUST begin with a transition showing your are comparing the differences of the second text/film to the first

    2. For each comparison, use compare/contrast cue words such as like, in contrast, unlike, on the other hand, etc.

    3. Address Only the Differences of the second text/film to the first text/film.

    4. Be sure to include examples with quotes and parenthetical citation to support the analysis (proving the similarities and differences that exist in the second text/film).

  3. Conclusion

    1. In the final paragraph give a brief insightful summary of the most important similarities and differences between the first and second text/film.

    2. Hook back to your lead idea/statement.

    3. End with a personal statement, a prediction, or another “snappy” clincher to leave a lasting impression.


Point by point outline sample: (in this format the transitions are located in within each paragraph to signify similarities and differences being described in the paragraph. For example “unlike, however, like wise, although…” The Introduction and the Conclusion are written the same as Block Structure

Point-by-point Format

I. Introduction- Same as Block

II. Paragraph 2-4 Comparing Similarities Point-by-point

  1. Transitions beginning each paragraph are made by repeating ideas, phrases or words. Without transitions, the essay will sound choppy and disjointed.
  2. Discuss how both text/films compare (similar) using one feature per paragraph (i.e. Archetypes, themes, characters, setting…)


  3. For each comparison paragraph, use comparison cue words such as like, similarly, also, like, etc.

  4. Be sure to include examples with quotes and parenthetical citation to support the analysis (proving the similarities that exist in both text/films).

  1. Paragraphs 5-7 Comparing Differences Point-by-point

    1. Transitions beginning each paragraph are made by repeating ideas, phrases or words. Without transitions, the essay will sound choppy and disjointed.

    2. Discuss how both text/films contrast (differ) using one feature per paragraph (i.e. Archetypes, themes, characters, setting…)

    3. For each comparison paragraph, use comparison cue words such as in contrast, unlike, on the other hand, etc.

    4. Be sure to include examples with quotes and parenthetical citation to support the analysis (proving the differences that exist in both text/films).

  1. Conclusion-Same as Block


Finally, write a Strong Conclusion. Be sure the conclusion has a summary of the main comparison points with some new insight. Hook back to the lead you used in the introduction, and leave a lasting impression on the reader.
BAD ENDINGS: DO NOT USE Weak conclusions

A. Apologizing for yourself

1. Well, that’s just my opinion…

2. I’m no expert, and that’s all I know (or that’s all I have to say), etc.

B. Repeating your main idea (thesis) in exactly the same words or words that are nearly the same.


C. Adding new information at the very end.

1. An amazing new piece of information is…

2. There is a new article that says…

D. Ending with a cliché

1. All’s well that ends well.



2. And these are the true facts.
Write a Conclusion for your compare and contrast essay. It’s easy. Use an insightful summary of your key comparison points, hook back to your lead and leave a lasting impression…


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