Annual Report 2014–15



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Our people


The City of Melbourne strives to make Melbourne great. Our high-calibre, talented workforce is vital to the daily delivery of excellent service to the community and achievement of our long-term vision.

Our people matter to us. We monitor our workforce turnover rates as part of Council Plan Goal 7.

We recognise that having a healthy and engaged workforce is critical to the long-term sustainability of our organisation. Creating a safe and diverse workplace, and offering opportunities for learning and development, ensures we will continue to attract and retain the workforce we need to deliver on our commitments.

The National Employment Standards (NES) underpin the Melbourne City Council Enterprise Agreement 2013, which provides the legal framework through which our employment terms and conditions are established for most of our employees. For executive employees, employment terms and conditions are governed by the NES, Local Government Industry Award 2010 and individual employment contracts. Policies and procedures are developed at the discretion of the organisation to support good governance and to provide transparency and clarity to all employees about the principles, rules and guidelines that apply.

People managers are required to ensure their employees know the values, policies and procedures to guide their behaviour and to encourage a workplace culture that is safe, supportive and respects differences.

All employees (full-time, part-time and casuals) have access to a range of benefits and services designed to help them maintain a healthy work-life balance and reach their full potential. This includes access to a range of professional and personal development activities, flexible work arrangements, health and wellbeing advice and programmes, and leave variations. We also host The Club, a non-profit association that aims to improve work-life balance and create a cooperative work environment. Our people benefit from a wide range of social, recreational and sporting activities and services organised by The Club, ranging from discounted zoo and cinema tickets to subsidised gym memberships and entry to sporting and theatre events.

We are currently in the process of developing a People Strategy. The People Strategy aligns to Goal 7: ‘Resources are managed well’. Over the next year we will progress the strategy by introducing a strategic workforce planning model, determine immediate high-risk areas and develop managers who have high-risk areas to implement and manage action plans. We will also focus on creating a more flexible and mobile workforce to allow employees to focus on outputs and accommodate flexible requirements.

Employee code of conduct


All our employees are expected to adhere to our Employee Code of Conduct. The code also applies to service providers, representatives and agents who act on our behalf. The document is given to all new employees with their letter of offer.

Enterprise Agreement


The City of Melbourne has a single enterprise agreement that covers 95 per cent of employees. The current agreement includes sustainability targets, work conditions and employee benefits. To maintain our position as a fair and flexible employer, we monitor the agreement’s operation and application through a staff consultative committee that meets quarterly. The Enterprise Agreement was operational from December 2013 and has a nominal expiry date of 30 June 2016.

Staff classifications


  • Classification 1 and 2 – child care workers, school crossing supervisors, fitness instructors, information officers

  • Classification 3 – child care workers, compliance officers, office administrative support

  • Classification 4 – administrative support, environmental health, project officers, kindergarten teachers

  • Classification 5 and 6 – professionals, analysts, programmers, technical staff, maternal and child health nurses, immunisation nurses, event managers

  • Classification 7 – team leaders and professionals

  • Executive – managers, directors and the Chief Executive Officer

Staff profile

As at June 2015, we employed 1495 people, full-time-equivalent (FTE) being 1295.76. Most of our work is undertaken by direct employees of the organisation. Our staff numbers increase slightly during summer as we have a seasonal operating pool. A breakdown of our direct employees is:


  • 1019 permanent full-time (1004.83 FTE)

  • 268 permanent part-time (155.79 FTE)

  • 155 maximum-term temporary – full-time and part-time (128.08 FTE)

  • 53 casual (7.06 FTE)

While most employees work in the central city, some are based at other sites across the municipality. Note that all employee data excludes supervised worker data as this is currently unavailable.

Total workforce by gender


  • Female – 58 per cent 883 (746.90 FTE)

  • Male – 42 per cent 612 (548.86 FTE)

Workforce turnover for all staff types


  • Voluntary and involuntary turnover – 16.99 per cent (up from last year’s rate of 13.22 per cent) for all employee types

  • Voluntary turnover only – 7.83 per cent (up from last year’s rate of 6.28 per cent) for permanent employees

Number of staff (head count) by employment type and gender 2012–13 to 2014–15


Employment type

2012–13

Female


2012–13

Male


2013–14

Female

2013–14

Male


2014–15

Female


2014–15

Male


Permanent full-time

516

482

503

481

540

479

Permanent part-time

173

56

205

68

203

65

Maximum term (full/part-time)

92

27

104

43

109

46

Casual

41

19

41

21

31

22

New staff by gender and age

Age


Female

Male

Total

Under 29 years 11 months

66 (64.48 FTE)

48 (46.34 FTE)

114 (110.82 FTE)

30–49 years 11 months

69 (62.99 FTE)

37 (35.52 FTE)

106 (98.51 FTE)

Over 50 years

17 (14.97 FTE)

8 (7.26 FTE)

25 (22.23 FTE)

Total

152 (142.44 FTE)

93 (89.12 FTE)

245 (231.56 FTE)

Our rate of new employee hires during the reporting period was 6.10 (by head count) or 5.60 FTE.

Workforce turnover by gender and age

Age


Female

Male

Total

Under 29 years 11 months

36 (35.6 FTE)

38 (37.28 FTE)

74 (72.88 FTE)

30–49 years 11 months

83 (73.01 FTE)

46 (43.91 FTE)

129 (116.92 FTE)

Over 50 years

28 (24.56 FTE)

23 (19.31 FTE)

51 (43.87 FTE)

Total

147 (133.17 FTE)

107 (100.5 FTE)

254 (233.67 FTE)

Number of staff (FTE) by organisational division, employment type and gender

Employment Type


Gender

City Business

City Design

City Planning and Infrastructure

Community Development

Corporate Business

Office of the CEO (refer note below)

Grand Total

Permanent part-time

Female

13.59

5.56

17.65

67.24

14.25

3.45

121.74

Permanent part-time

Male

3.69

1.62

6.30

18.21

4.23

0.00

34.05

Permanent full-time

Female

93.74

28.19


107.00

215.73

54.40

33.66

532.72

Permanent full-time

Male

35.03

42.07

215.62

75.88

90.51

13.00

472.11

Maximum term part-time

Female

2.24

2.46

7.70

11.50

0.00

0.60

24.50

Maximum term part- time

Male

3.13

1.79

1.75

4.62


0.00

0.00

11.29

Maximum term full-time

Female

22.99

3.00

10.50

17.00

6.40

4.00

63.89

Maximum term full-time

Male

5.00

2.00

7.40

9.00

5.00

0.00

28.40

Casual

Female

0.22

0.10

0.80

2.93

0.00

0.00

4.05


Casual

Male

1.56

0.10

0.00

1.35

0.00

0.00

3.01

Grand total

 N/A

181.19

86.89

374.72

423.46

174.79

54.71

1295.76

Note: the Office of the CEO includes Governance branch, Corporate Planning and Lea(r)ning branch and Lord Mayor’s Office)

City of Melbourne executive remuneration


Position

Name

Total employment package

Start at COM

Current contract start

Current contract end


Chief Executive Officer

Ben Rimmer

$460,000

9 February 2015

9 February 2015

8 February 2019

Director City Design

Rob Adams

$383,617

14 October 1986

15 September 2015

14 September 2017

Director City Planning and Infrastructure

Geoff Lawler

$362,700

7 October 1996

25 October 2013

24 October 2016

Director City Business

Martin Cutter

$352,345

16 August 2004

1 November 2012

31 October 2015 (has signed a new contract)

Director Community Development

Linda Weatherson

$346,520


7 December 1987

19 July 2012

18 July 2015 (has signed a new contract)

Director Corporate Business

Mark Stoermer

$321,264

19 April 2010

19 April 2013

18 April 2016 (former employee – finished 3 July 2015)

Equality and diversity

Embracing equality and diversity involves recognising the value of our individual differences and treating everyone fairly, equally and with respect.

We strive to provide a work environment that is safe and supportive, free of discrimination, harassment and bullying, and where all individuals associated with the organisation treat each other fairly and with respect.

We are committed to promoting flexible workplace practices in support of diversity, increasing the representation of women in key leadership positions, and encouraging styles of management which actively embrace diversity and inclusion.

Our Chief Executive Officer has joined the Male Champions of Change Program and has led six ‘Listen and Learn’ forums designed to uncover the barriers for gender equity, identify the culture and conditions that allow women to thrive, and understand what an inclusive leader looks like.

Training was provided across the organisation in our suite of policies and procedures to support people managers and staff to identify and address gender inequality in the workplace and change social norms that condone violence against women. In 2015 we will again participate in the United Gender Equity Staff Attitude Survey which will help us understand the impact of our policy and training interventions by comparing with 2014 benchmark results.

We have a network of volunteer contact officers trained to help employees identify options and resources to deal with workplace discrimination and harassment. Every few years we conduct a Diversity Census to gain a snapshot of the current diversity make-up within our organisation. This helps us develop programs, policies, initiatives and strategies to suit the diversity of our employees now and in the future, allowing us to grow in the area of diversity. The next diversity Census will be in 2016.

To help us assess how well our equality and diversity goals are supported in the workplace, we collect data on the gender and age makeup of our workforce (see Staff profile) and incidents of discrimination. There were no incidents of discrimination recorded during the reporting year.

Benefits of diversity:


  • Increases recruitment options

  • Improves attraction and retention

  • Sustains innovation and creativity

  • Improves teamwork

  • Strengthens equal opportunity

  • Improves organisational perceptions and reputation

  • Improves employee satisfaction and performance.

Ratio of basic salary and remuneration of women to men by employee category


Award employees (Class 1 to Class 7 also including senior officer staff)

  • 1 female to 0.80 males (previous year was 0.73)

  • 1 male to 1.44 females (previous year was 1.45)

Executive employees (Exec 1 to Exec 5)

  • 1 female to 2.20 males (previous year was similar at 2.18)

  • 1 male to 0.46 females (previous year was the same at 0.46)

Employee classification by gender (FTE)


Gender

Class 1

Class 2

Class 3

Class 4

Class 5

Class 6

Class 7 / Senior Officer


Exec

Grand total

Female

9.95

50.94

143.16

144.1

168.87

132.08

80.96

16.84

746.9

Male

15.11

20.58

111.21

89.42

100.44

97.77

77.33

37.00

548.86

Grand total

25.06

71.52

254.37

233.52

269.31


229.85

158.29

53.84

1295.76

Employee classification by age group (FTE)


Age group

Class 1

Class 2

Class 3

Class 4

Class 5

Class 6

Class 7 / Senior Officer

Exec

Grand total

Under 29 years 11 months

16.52

23.59

51.04

67.45

39.88

11.48

3.75

0.00


213.71

30–49 years 11 months

2.48

29.34

122.96

121.66

158.21

150.6

96.94

20.81

703.00

Over 50 years

6.06

18.59

80.37

44.41

71.22

67.77

57.6

33.03

379.05

Grand Total

25.06

71.52

254.37

233.52

269.31


229.85

158.29

53.84

1295.76

Employee health and safety


We strive to provide a safe and healthy workplace and environment for our staff, suppliers, contractors, volunteers and visitors. Each person is responsible for recognising workplace hazards and correcting or reporting them in a timely manner.

Our Occupational Health and Safety Policy Statement outlines our approach to safety in the workplace. We manage risk and occupational hazards by continuously evaluating and improving work environments and our occupational health and safety (OHS) management system.

This system is audited against the Australian Safety Standard AS/NZS 4801:2001 and our accreditation was maintained in 2014–15. This is the second year we have reported OHS rates data. The data below is representative of our employees only; currently we do not record this data for contractors. There were zero fatalities recorded during 2014–15.

We have a proactive injury prevention strategy and an early intervention approach to all work-related injuries and illnesses that focuses on sustainable return-to-work programs.


This year we successfully reduced the number of lost days and number of employees on alternative duties by a significant margin. We achieved this by proactively managing claims, adopting early intervention and constant follow-up with employees, medical professionals and our workcover agent to determine employees’ capacity for work. Employees with work-related injuries are referred to a local clinic so medical intervention can begin straight away. We also provide Employee Assistance Program referrals for employees who require counselling help.


  • Lost Time Injury Frequency Rate (LTIFR): 7.1 (calculated as number of Lost Time Injuries recorded in the reporting period divided by total hours worked multiplied by 1,000,000)

  • Total Recordable Injury Frequency Rate (TRIFR): 30.6 (calculated as number of Lost Time Injuries plus number of Medical Treatment Injuries (MTIs) recorded in the reporting period divided by total hours worked multiplied by 1,000,000)

  • Occupational Disease Rate (ODR): 0

  • Absentee Rate (AR): 3.77 (total sick leave absences as a percentage of ordinary time available. Last year’s AR rate was 3.42 per cent as reported in Annual Report. This includes sick leave with and without medical certificate, carers leave, sick unpaid leave, sick pending workcover and workcover)

  • Total work-related fatalities: 0

Lost time and medically treated injuries by type


Nature of injury (medically treated)

Number of reported incidents

Slips, trips and falls

17

Other types of accident

8

Mental stress

7

Vehicle accident

4

Struck by moving object

4

Manual handling


4

Occupational overuse syndrome

3

Striking against stationary object

2

Type of accident not known

2

Bite (insect, animal)

2

Explosion and implosion

1

Caught between moving objects

1

Caught by a stationary object or machine

1

Striking against moving objects

1

Stepping on object

1

Fall from height or into depth

1

Total

59

Workcover claims


We received 24 WorkCover claims in 2014–15. Five claims were rejected with 19 accepted. Our WorkCover premium rate is currently 0.67 per cent and our performance rating is currently 0.70. Although our three-year performance rating has declined from a rating of 0.50 in 2013–14, our performance remains 20.59 per cent better than the industry average.

Financial year


Standard claims

Minor claims

Premium incl GST ($)

Premium as per cent of remuneration

2014–15

16

3

816,817.43

0.67

2013–14 (see note below)

20

9

697,432.82

0.52

2012–13 (see note below)

18

4

420,264.55

0.22

Note: Annual claims data have changed retrospectively as the result of minor claims having progressed to standard claims or claims having been rejected.

Employee development and training

Investing in our staff is about developing the workforce we need to keep pace with the dynamic demands of a changing city as well as our customers’ expectations. In recent years, we have made great strides in defining the cultural and leadership qualities we think are needed to best position the organisation for the future.

This year, to complement our defined leadership capabilities, we implemented an Organisational Capability Framework to further define the behaviours we expect and capabilities we require. All our employee development and training is aligned to these expected behaviours and capabilities, to support the key skills, knowledge and capability needed to achieve our organisational objectives.

In addition to our formal training program, our mentoring program paired experienced leaders with emerging talent to support their development in the areas of governance, sustainability and community engagement. By sharing their knowledge and experiences, our mentors play a pivotal role in the development of our staff.

Last year we ran 212 courses through our City of Melbourne Learning program, with a total attendance of 2082 participants. A breakdown of average training hours by gender and classification can be seen at Average formal training hours by gender and classification.

We saw an increase in the average training hours for Class 7 and above from the previous year as a result of some targeted leadership development. This was aimed at supporting the improvement of our leaders’ capability to coach and develop their teams to increase productivity while empowering staff to fulfil their potential.

As part of evaluating how well embedded our development and learning goals have become through all layers of the organisation, we collected and analysed individual staff performance and development plans to assess how well these reflect objectives around on-the-job learning (ideally 70 per cent of learning) coaching and feedback (ideally 20 per cent of learning) and formal training (ideally 10 per cent of learning). We reported back the results to managers to support their ongoing people development.

Another major piece of work providing insight into how we are tracking against our desired organisational culture came from the 2014 employee survey. The results help inform our approach to ongoing cultural and leadership development. We also routinely collect data on attendance and trainee satisfaction as a way to continually improve delivery of our learning program.

As outlined, the City of Melbourne’s Fraud and Corruption Policy is a key part of its risk management approach. All employees are made aware of updated policies, procedures and training requirements via regular CEO messages. The table below shows the total number of employees who received training on anti-corruption.

The nine skills expected of our leaders

A City of Melbourne leader is expected to: coach and develop others; lead improvement; collaborate and build partnerships; align services to customer needs; think strategically; manage resources well; develop themselves; build effective teams; and manage performance.



Leadership at the City of Melbourne


Increased self-awareness to support development through the leadership journey.

A continuous cycle of:



  • Assessing our leadership capability through self-assessments, manager and employee discussion and 360 degree feedback

  • Planning our development through individual development discussions and plans

  • Developing our leadership capability through the 70:20:10 leaning principle

Leadership capabilities (defines the capabilities of our leaders): coaches and develops, leads improvement, collaborates and builds partnerships, thinks strategically, manages resources well, aligns services to customer needs, develops self, builds effective teams and manages performance.

ICARE values: integrity, courage, accountability, respect, excellence – our values guide our actions and behaviours.


Average formal training hours by gender and classification


Gender

Class 1

Class 2

Class 3

Class 4

Class 5


Class 6

Class 7 / Senior Officer

Exec

Total average

Female

6.2

5.1

9.5

9.9

9.8

9.1

12.3

17.0

9.9

Male

7.8

4.5

12.9

11.6

8.7

8.6

11.0

13.2

9.8

Anti–corruption training by classification

Class


Class 1

Class 2

Class 3

Class 4

Class 5

Class 6

Class 7 / Senior Officer

Exec

Total

Number

7

5

14

28

24

32

33

29

172


: SiteCollectionDocuments
SiteCollectionDocuments -> Year one progress report
SiteCollectionDocuments -> City of Melbourne Annual Report 2012–13
SiteCollectionDocuments -> Year one key achievements Melbourne Music Symposium 2015
SiteCollectionDocuments -> City of Melbourne Annual Report 2015-16
SiteCollectionDocuments -> We are pleased to present to you the City of Melbourne’s annual report for 2012–13
SiteCollectionDocuments -> World War One memorials in the City of Melbourne by Dr Michael Cathcart
SiteCollectionDocuments -> Learning Objective Activities Areas of Learning
SiteCollectionDocuments -> Queen mary 2 Fact Sheet
SiteCollectionDocuments -> Discussion Paper on Ecosystem Services for the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry Final Report
SiteCollectionDocuments -> Transport/movement re theme: leaders


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