Annual Report Department of Special Education and Child Development



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2013-14 Annual Report
Department of Special Education and Child Development


A. HIGHLIGHTS OF THE YEAR


Major accomplishments (including student accomplishments) of unit/department/college during the year reported by Academic Affairs Goal.




  1. To offer a portfolio of educational programs that are forward looking and responsive to the intellectual, cultural, and economic needs of the region:

The Department of Special Education and Child Development offers a broad range of teacher preparation and leadership development programs that lead to initial and advanced professional licensure from the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. Programs offered by the Department are listed by their titles below:

Bachelor of Arts in Special Education: General Curriculum

Bachelor of Arts in Special Education: Adapted Curriculum

Bachelor of Arts in Special Education/ Elementary Education

Bachelor of Arts in Birth through Kindergarten

Graduate Certificate in Special Education General Curriculum

Graduate Certificate in Special Education Adapted Curriculum

Graduate Certificate in Special Education Academically or Intellectually Gifted

Graduate Certificate in Special Education Autism Spectrum Disorders

Graduate Certificate in Child and Family Studies

Master of Arts in Teaching Special Education General Curriculum

Master of Arts in Teaching Special Education Adapted Curriculum

Master of Arts in Child and Family Studies/ Birth through Kindergarten

Master of Education Special Education

Master of Education Special Education Academically or Intellectually Gifted

Master of Education Child and Family Studies


Doctor of Philosophy Special Education


  1. To advance programs of research and scholarship that expand the frontiers of knowledge, including those that solve problems at the interface of disciplines and leverage discovery for the public benefit:

The Special Education Program at UNC Charlotte has a long history of securing external grants that have funded a wide range of projects addressing important and timely issues in special education. Currently funded grants within the department include projects related to research and development, technical assistance, and personnel preparation... These externally funded research and personnel preparation projects are entitled:

  • National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center/ Transition to College and Careers Center

  • North Carolina Post-Schools Outcomes Project

  • Preparation of Leadership Personnel

  • Communicating Interagency Relationships and Collaborative Linkages for Exceptional Students (CIRCLES)

  • Collaborative Preservice: Preservice: Preparing Excellent Teachers for All Students

  • A Study of the Effects of a Three-Tier Model of interagency Collaboration on Transition Outcomes for Students with Disabilities.

  • Transition to College and Careers Center

  • Personnel Preparation Program in Low Incidence Severe Disabilities

  • UNC Charlotte NC State Improvement Project/ Institutions of Higher Education Partnership

  • Center on Secondary Education for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

  • Project BRIDGES: Building Reading Intervention Designed for General Education Subjects

  • UNC Charlotte's Ph.D. Program in Special Education with a Specialty in Multi-tiered Interventions

  • National Center and State Collaborative General Supervision Enhancement Grant
  • The Solutions Project: Teaching Students with Moderate/Severe Intellectual Disability to Solve Mathematical Problems


  • FLEX Literacy Efficacy Study

  • GoTalk Phonics: Phonics Instruction for Individuals with Intellectual Disability



  1. To graduate students prepared for personal success and civic responsibility in the 21st century by offering challenging degree programs, encouraging community engagement, and integrating the values of liberal education throughout the undergraduate curriculum:



  • The Department had 202 students enrolled this year in the Special Education BA Program, 95 students enrolled in the BA in Child and Family Development, and108 enrolled in the BA for the Dual Licensure Program.

  • The Department enrolled 124 students designated as Pre- Special Education majors and 111 students designated as Pre-Child and Family Development majors.

  • The Department enrolled 205 Child and Family Development Program minors in the fall and spring semesters.

  • The Department had197 graduate students enrolled this year in the Special Education Graduate Certificate in Special Education Program (83 were enrolled in the Adapted Curriculum Program, 114 were enrolled in the General Curriculum Program. Seventy-eight students were enrolled in Phase II (MAT Program)

  • The Department had 22 graduate students enrolled this year in the Special Education M.Ed. program and 7 graduate students enrolled in the Child and Family Studies M.Ed. program.

  • The Department enrolled 41 students in the Ph.D. Program during 2013-2014. Five new students have been admitted for 2014-15.
  • The Department’s distance education programs served 251 total students who yielded 429 total enrolments in fiscal year 2014. This count includes: (1) AIG (2) Special Education-General Curriculum Graduate Certificate and M.A.T. (3) Special Education-Adapted Curriculum Graduate Certificate and MAT, (4) Special Education-General Curriculum Pathways to Teaching Program , (5) SPED 2100 and (6) Special Education ASD Graduate Certificate.


  • Fifty-eight special education undergraduate majors who enrolled in student teaching (24 General Curriculum, 10 Adapted Curriculum and 23 Dual Licensure Program) were recommended for licensure in 2013-2014.

  • The Department graduated 42 students with the MAT in Special Education in 2013-14 compared to 29 students in 2012-13 compared to 22 students with the MAT in 2011-12; compared to19 students with the MAT in 2010-11 compared to 22 students in 2009-10, compared to 25 graduates in 2008-09, 15 graduates in 2007-08, 26 graduates in 2006-07 and 17 graduates in 2005-06.

  • The Department graduated 8 students with the M.Ed. in Special Education in 2013-14, compared to 7 in 2012-13, compared to 5 students in 2011-12; compared to14 students during 2010-11; 16 students 2009-10; 27 during 2008-09; 6 graduates in 2007-08; 11 graduates in 2006-07 and 3 graduates in 2005-06.

  • The Department graduated 2 students with the M.Ed. in Child and Family Studies in 2013-13, compared to 3 students in 2012-13, compared to 15 students with the M.Ed. in 2011-12; compared to13 students in 2010-11; 24 students in 2009-10, graduates in 2008-09; 10 graduates in 2007-08, 7 graduates in 2006-07 and 7 graduates during 2005-06.

  • Thirty-four graduate students in Special Education who enrolled in student teaching (23 in General and 11 in Adapted Curriculum) were successful in their student teaching and were recommended for licensure in 2013-2014.

  • Sixteen undergraduate and 6 graduate students successfully completed their student teaching in the Child and Family Development program and were recommended for B-K licensure in 2013-2014.
  • Eighty-six graduate students in the Academically or Intellectually Gifted Program completed all requirements for licensure.




  1. To integrate at the graduate level quality teaching and mentoring with research to prepare the next generation of leaders:

This year’s graduates from the Department of Special Education and Child Development’s Ph.D. Program in Special Education have accepted faculty positions at comprehensive, doctoral degree granting or research intensive universities around the nation or in leadership positions in public school programs. Listed below are doctoral graduates and the universities/ programs where they have been hired:


  • Dr. Leah Wood, Assistant Professor, School of Education, California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, California

  • Dr. Julie Thompson, Research Associate, Research in Autism and Intellectual/ Neurodevelopmental Disabilities, College of Education, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan

  • Dr. Adrienne Anderson, Assistant Professor, Special Education School of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Allied Professions, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, North Carolina

  • Dr. Alicia Saunders, Research Associate, Project Solutions, Department of Special Education and Child Development, College of Education, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina

Recent Department of Special Education Ph.D. Program Graduate, Dr. Shaqwana Freeman-Green, Assistant Professor, Department of Special Education, College of Education, Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois, received the 2014 International Council for Exceptional Children, Division for Learning Disabilities Outstanding Doctoral Research Award.

The Department continued to receive funds to support doctoral students through external funding from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs under the grant entitled University of North Carolina at Charlotte PhD Program. Funding for 2013-2014 (no cost extension) A new UNC Charlotte Personal Preparation Leadership Development funding proposal has been submitted to the U.S Department of Education (decision pending). In addition, the U.S. Department of Education funded a second leadership preparation program entitled Ph.D. Program in Special Education with a Specialty in Multi-tiered Interventions during 2013-14 for the second year of a four year project.

Dr. Diane Browder, Coordinator Ph.D. Program, is the Department’s representative on the national Higher Education Consortium in Special Education (HECSE). In addition, Dr. Fred Spooner is a co-representative of the Department. Dr. Lee, Sherry, Department Chair participates in Consortium meetings as possible.
The Department continues to promote the success of doctoral students through opportunities to participate in research, preparation of manuscripts for publications, and quality teaching. Each doctoral student demonstrates competence in abilities to summarize, synthesize, and evaluate studies that use a variety of research designs, plan and implement studies that meet standards from quality research, and synthesize a collection of studies to determine if a study is evidence based. The ultimate outcome of their individual research project is the preparation of a manuscript for submission to a peer reviewed journal. In the area of teaching, all doctoral students complete co-teaching assignments with veteran faculty members in the department. In addition, their “college teaching” experiences provide them the opportunity to deliver a complete course (under guided supervision).

Finally, Department faculty members work with doctoral candidates to prepare chapters, manuscripts or curriculum guides for publication. Listed below are publications completed in collaboration among current doctoral candidates, recent program completers and faculty members during 2013-14:

Chapters:

Lo, Y-y, Correa, V., Anderson, A., & Swart, K. (2014). Family involvement in culturally responsive social-skill instruction for Latino students with disabilities. In L. Lo & D. Hiatt-Michael (Eds.), Promising practices to empower culturally and linguistically diverse families of children with disabilities (pp. 15-32). Scottsdale, AZ: Information Age Publishing.

Saunders, A. F., Lo, Y.-y., & Polly, D. (2014). Beginning numeracy skills. In D. M. Browder & F. Spooner (Eds), More language arts, math, and science for students with severe disabilities (pp. 149-168). Baltimore, MD: Brookes Publishing.
Spooner, F., McKissick, B. R., Hudson, M., & Browder, D. M. (2014). Access to the general curriculum in general education classes. In M. Agran, F. Brown, C. Hughes, C. Quirk, & D. Ryndak (Eds.) Equity and full participation for individuals with severe disabilities: A vision for the future (pp. 217-234). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.
Spooner, F., McKissick, B. R., Knight, V., & Walker, R. (2014). Teaching science concepts. In D. M. Browder & F. Spooner (Eds.), More language arts, math, and science for students with severe disabilities (pp. 215-234). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.
Thompson, J. L., Bethune, K. S., Wood, C. L., & Pugalee, D. K. (2014). Teaching grade-aligned math skills. In D. Browder & F. Spooner (Eds.), MORE language arts, math, and science for students with severe disabilities. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.
Wakeman, S.Y., & Lee. A. (2014). Common Core State Standards: A primer for special educators. In D. Browder & F. Spooner (Eds.), More Language Arts, math, and science for students with severe disabilities (pp. 37-59). Baltimore, MD; Brookes.

Articles:

Bethune, K. S., & Wood, C. L. (2013). Effects of wh-question graphic organizers on reading comprehension skills of students with autism spectrum disorders. Education and Training in Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 48(2), 236-244.

Browder, D.M., Hudson, M.E., & Wood, L. (2013). Teaching students with moderate intellectual disability who are emergent readers to comprehend text. Exceptionality, 21, 191-206.
Cease-Cook, J., Test, D.W., & Scroggins, L. (2013). Effects of the CD-ROMs version of the Self-Advocacy Strategy on quality of contributions in IEP meetings of high school students with intellectual disability. Education and Training in Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 48, 258-268.
Hudson, M. E., Browder, D. M., & Wood, L. (2013). Review of experimental research on academic learning by students with moderate and severe intellectual disability in general education. Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities, 38, 17-29.
Jimenez, B. A., Lo, Y.-y., & Saunders, A. F. (2014). The additive effects of scripted lessons plus guided notes on science quiz scores of students with intellectual disability and autism. The Journal of Special Education, 47, 231-244. doi:10.1177/0022466912437937
Matthews, M. S., Ritchotte, J. A., & McBee, M. T. (2013). Effects of schoolwide cluster grouping and within-class ability grouping on elementary school students’ academic achievement growth. High Ability Studies
, 24(2), 81-97. doi: 10.1080/13598139.2013.846251

McKissick, B. R., Spooner, F., Wood, C. L., & Diegelmann, K. M. (2013). Effects of computer-assisted explicit instruction on map-reading skills for students with autism. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders. , 7, 1653-1662. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1016/j.rasd.2013.09.013

Mustian, A. L., Mazzotti, V. L., & Test, D. W. (2013). Disseminating evidence-based practices in secondary transition. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 15, 197-204. doi: 10.1177/1098300712459355
Rivera, C. J., Spooner, F., Wood, C. L., & Hicks, S. C. (2013). Multimedia shared stories for diverse learners with moderate intellectual disability. Journal of Special Education Technology, 28(4), 53-68.
Saunders, A., Spooner, F., Browder, D. M., Wakeman, S., & Lee, A. (2013). Building the meaning of texts: Teaching the common core in English language arts to students with severe disabilities. TEACHING Exceptional Children
, 46(2), 22-33.
Curriculum Guides:

Test, D.W., Bartholomew, A., & Cease-Cook, J., (2014). Secondary Transition. IRIS Module. (http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/module/tran/ )



  1. To respond to the educational needs of a diverse community of learners through innovative programming and delivery of credit and non-credit programs of study:

  • The Department’s Pathways to Teaching Summer Institute enrolled 61 students in the summer of 2013, compared to 42 students in the summer of 2012; compared to 42 students in 2011, compared to 49 students in 2010, compared to 50 students in the summer of 2009; 41 students in the summer of 2008; 70 students in the summer of 2007, 176 in 2006; and 281 in 2005.
  • The Department’s Academically and Intellectually Gifted program enrolled 99 students distance education courses in 2013-14, compared to in 203 students in 2012-13; compared to 182 students in distance education courses in 2011-12; compared to 231 students in 2010-11; compared to 278 students in 2009-10; 284 students in 2008-09; 346 enrollments in 2007-08, 292 enrollments in 2006-07 and 196 enrollments in 2005-06.


  • The Department’s Autism Spectrum Disorders Graduate Certificate program enrolled 25 students in distance education courses in 2013-14, compared to 29 students in distance education courses in 2012-13 compared to 42 students enrolled in 2011-12.

  • Sixty-three students are enrolled in the Department’s baccalaureate dual licensure preparation program in special education and elementary education in 2013-14, compared to 45 during 2012-13. Funding from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs supports the Collaborative Preservice: Preparing Excellent Teachers for All Students.

  • The Child and Family Development Program created an educational and exploratory trip to Reggio Emilia, Italy to examine the Reggio Emilia approach to early childhood education. This program is one of the most innovative, high-quality infant-toddler and pre-primary systems in the world.



  1. To promote student achievement and personal development by providing high quality advising, academic services, curricular enrichment, and international experiences:

The Department of Special Education and Child Development continues to update all degree, licensure and certificate program’s planning worksheets to reflect the priority of “Graduation Planning.” Changes in the Planning Sheets are designed to enhance graduation oriented advising specifically for first time, full time freshmen. Changing the name of the Planning Sheets to “Graduation Planning” worksheet encourages students to focus on graduation. For consistency across programs we have revised all Planning Sheets to support the concept of longer term planning.

All Special Education pre-licensure advising for undergraduate students is the responsibility of a single Special Education Advising Coordinator. In addition, advising for all online and on-campus Graduate Certificate students in special education is the responsibility of a second faculty member with expertise in online learning strategies to engage distant students. All advising of Special Education M.Ed. students is coordinated by the Special Education Graduate Program Director. All Child and Family Development Program students are advised the CHFD Program Coordinator. All students applying for admission into the department’s programs are reviewed by either the Special Education Advising Coordinator (undergraduates and MAT students), the Special Education Graduate Program Director (M.Ed.) The ASD Graduate Certificate Program Coordinator, or the AIG Graduate Program Director (AIG graduate certificate and AIG M.Ed.), or the Child and Family Development Program Coordinator (all students) using the Admission Pro online application process.

The Department recently approved an advising change to more effectively advise students seeking advanced licensure after completing the Graduate Certificate in Special Education. Online applications are reviewed and approved by the Graduate Program Director. The Graduate Program Director also serves as their advisor as they work to complete the final 12 credit-hours of the MAT and North Carolina Standard Professional 2 (SP2) Professional Educators License.

Advisors in the Teacher Education, Advising Licensure, Recruitment and Retention (TEAL-R) Office support Department faculty in advising students. The recruiter for the College’s Pathways to Teaching program offers initial supports to potential students who may be career changers or who may members of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Teach for America Corps as they seek information about entering the Master of Arts in Teaching Program.


  1. To engage in focused efforts to creatively address university and community needs through internal collaboration and partnerships with public, private, and non-profit organizations:



  • Dr. Kelly Anderson served a member of the Annual Conference Planning Committee for the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs 2014 Project Director’s Conference, Washington, DC.

  • Dr. Cynthia Baughan is a member of the Board of Directors of the South Carolina Council for Exceptional Children where she serves as Chair of the Awards Committee.

  • Dr. Cynthia Baughan is a Program Reviewer for the accreditation group National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education/ Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation.

  • Dr. John Beattie serves on the Board of Directors of the Learning Disabilities Association of Charlotte.

  • Dr. Diane Browder is recipient of the 2014 Research Award for the International Council for Exceptional Children, Division on Autism and Developmental Disabilities.

  • Dr. Diane Browder is a member of the Standing Grant Review Panel for the Institute for Education Sciences’ National Center for Special Education Research.

  • Dr. Vivian Correa is Past-President of the Board of Directors of the Teacher Education Division, International Council for Exceptional Children.

  • Dr. Vivian Correa served as a member of the International Council for Exceptional Children’s Standards Workgroup.

  • Dr. Vivian Correa is a member of the Board of Directors of Mecklenburg Smart Start.

  • Dr. Lindsay Flynn has been reappointed as Assistant Professor, Special Education in the Department of Special Education and Child Development.
  • Dr. Lindsay Flynn is Program Chair for the American Education Research Association’s Special Education Special Interest Group.


  • Dr. Suzanne Lamorey serves on the Advisory Board, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Pre-K Program.

  • Dr. Suzanne Lamorey serves on the Advisory Board, Early Education Program, Central Piedmont Community College.

  • Dr. Suzanne Lamorey is the recipient of a Fulbright Teaching and Research Fellowship and spent the academic year in New Delhi, India at Lady Irwin College and at the National University of Educational Planning and Administration.

  • Dr. Ya-yu Lo is a Conference Program Associate Chair of the Board of Directors of the Chinese American Educational Research and Development Association. In this role she planned their 2014 Annual Conference held in Philadelphia in April, 2014.

  • Dr. Ya-yu Lo is Managing Editor of the Journal of Special Education.

  • Dr. Ya-Yu Lo is Associate Editor for the journal Education and Treatment of Children

  • Dr. Michael Matthews is Associate Editor of the Journal of Advanced Academics.

  • Dr. Michael Matthews is a member of the Board of Directors of the North Carolina Association for the Gifted and Talented.

  • Dr. Michael Matthews is Member-at-Large and Chair-Elect of the Executive Committee, SIG-Research on Giftedness and Talent, American Educational Research Association.

  • Dr. Michael Matthews serves on the Publications Committee of the National Association for Gifted Children.

  • Dr. Michael Matthews is awards committee chair and Publications Committee member of the National Association for Gifted Children.

  • Michael Matthews received the 2014 Service Award for the North Carolina Association for the Gifted and Talented in recognition of “outstanding service and contributions” to the organization as a member of the Board of Directors.
  • Ms. Deana Murphy provided leadership for the successful 35th Child and Family Development Conference.


  • Dr. Chris O’Brien is the North Carolina Political Action Liaison/Representative for the International Council for Exceptional Children, Teacher Education Division.

  • Dr. Chris Obrien is University Partner with the Cabarrus County Schools, North Carolina State Improvement Project, Content Literacy Continuum® Pilot Project,

  • Dr. Lee Sherry is a member of the Cooperative Planning Consortium of North Carolina Special Education Teacher Preparation Programs.

  • Dr. Lee Sherry is Editor, Pioneers Press, the newsletter of the Pioneer Division of the International Council for Exceptional Children.

  • Dr. Lee Sherry serves as a member of the Advisory Board of the North Carolina State Personnel Development Grant/ State Improvement Grant.

  • Dr. Pamela Shue is Assistant Editor of the National Head Start Association Dialog: A Research to Practice Journal for the Early Childhood Field.

  • Dr. Pamela Shue is Assistant Editor, Literacy Development in Young Children Newsletter, a special interest group of the international Reading Association.

  • Dr. Pam Shue is recipient of a University of North Carolina General Administration grant to develop a US-China Global Understanding course in early childhood education to be delivered in the fall of 2013

  • Dr. Pam Shue conducted an exploratory study abroad trip to Italy to develop a future course on early childhood programs based on the internationally renowned Reggio Emilia infant and toddler program.

  • Dr. Pam Shue was Organizer and Chair of Charlotte’s first Ultimate Block Party to promote the importance of play and learning in children’s lives.

  • Dr. Pam Shue was inducted into UNC Charlotte’s Honor Society for International Scholars – Phi Beta Delta Mu.
  • Dr. Pam Shue is President, North Carolina Birth-Kindergarten Higher Education Consortium.


  • Dr. JaneDiane Smith serves as a consultant to Community Pathways: Early Intervention for Hospitalized Children at Carolinas Medical Center/ Levine Children’s Hospital, Charlotte.

  • Dr. JaneDiane Smith is Faculty Liaison for Child Life Internships at the Levine Children’s Hospital and the Jeff Gordon Children’s Hospital.

  • Dr. JaneDiane Smith is the Co-Director of the UNC Charlotte Community Touchpoints Project supporting early childhood programs.

  • Dr. Fred Spooner is a member of the Publications Operating Committee and the Personnel Preparation Committee, TASH.

  • Dr. Fred Spooner co-edits The Journal of Special Education and is Associate Editor for the journal Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities.

  • Dr. Fred Spooner serves as senior advisor to the Executive Council of the North Carolina Association for Behavior Analysis.

  • Fred Spooner was invited to serve as a member of the “Voices from the Field” Guest Panel honoring James Gallagher’s 50 Years of Contributions to the Field of Special Education at the Samuel A. Kirk Symposium.

  • Dr. David Test is co-editor of the newsletter, Savage Controversies, of the Evidence-Based Practice Special Interest Group of the Association for Behavior Analysis International.

  • Dr. David Test is a member of the Board of Directors of the International Council for Exception Children’s Division on Career Development and Transition. He also serves on their Research Committee and their Publications Committee.

  • Dr. David Test is a member of Advisory Board for the Western Carolina University Participant (UP) Program.
  • Dr. David Test is a member of the Technical Workgroup for the National Center for Special Education Research, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research and the U.S. Department of Education’s, Office of Special Education Programs “Improving Outcomes for Adolescents with Disabilities.


  • Dr. David Test is a member of the Advisory Board for the Kansas Transition Technical Assistance Project, Kansas State Department of Education, Topeka, Kansas

  • Dr. David Test co-edits the journal Career Development for Exceptional Individuals.

  • Dr. David Test is a member of the Advisory Board for the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research Center on Transition to Employment.

  • Dr. Shawnee Wakeman was promoted to Associate Clinical Professor. The new guidelines in the College of Education’s revised Reappointment, Promotion and Tenure document provide opportunities for non-tenure accruing faculty to seek promotion.

  • Dr. Charles Wood is Secretary of the Board of Directors of the North Carolina Council for Exceptional Children and served on the 2014 North Carolina CEC Conference Planning Committee.



  1. To support the success of faculty and staff through career development opportunities, mentoring, and access to supportive infrastructure:

Faculty members from the Department of Special Education and Child Development have served in leadership roles as the College completed and implemented the revision of the Reappointment, Promotion, and Tenure (RPT) document to increase clarity, reflect the scholarship expectations of research universities, and improve guidance toward successful RPT reviews. In particular, Dr. Charles Wood served as Co-Chair of the Committee examining expectations of Associate Professors as they are considered for promotion and permanent tenure. Drs. Shawnee Wakeman and Janet Baxter served as Co-Chairs of the committee examining the development of a new section of the RPT document that provides guidelines for reappointment and promotion for Non-tenure Track Faculty. In addition, Dr. Lee Sherry served on this committee. It is a pleasure to note that Dr. Shawnee Wakeman was promoted to Associate Clinical Professor.

The Coordinator of the Peer Observation Program is working with a college-wide team to implement new Peer Observation of Teaching guidelines. Included for the first time are Non- Tenure accruing faculty members as well as Part-time faculty. The Department fully supports the new of Peer Observation of Teaching guidelines.
The Department supports implementation of enhanced faculty mentoring programs for all faculty members – tenure accruing, non-tenure accruing and part-time faculty. Every new faculty member as well as part-time and non-tenure accruing faculty members are assigned veteran faculty mentors in their field of scholarship/ endeavor.
The Department routinely supports ongoing professional development opportunities for faculty members in numerous areas of professional interest including technology integration, instructional strategies, and enrichment activities. Department support is provided through (1) nominations for specialized professional development opportunities, (2) travel reimbursements for professional conferences, seminars and workshops/trainings, and (3) stipends for summer institutes and professional preparation programs. Finally, live webinars and on-campus professional development opportunities are promoted and encouraged.
Faculty members are routinely nominated for recognition of their work by the Department Chair (and other members of the faculty). The nominations of faculty members who provided notable service to the institution, the profession and the community are submitted for consideration for recognition.

The issue of faculty teaching loads will be undertaken and reviewed by the Faculty Teaching Load Committee in collaboration with the College of Education Faculty Council. Three Department faculty members will participate in this important committee beginning in the fall. Dr. Diane Browder has agreed to co-chair the Committee and Dr. David Test and Dr. Charles Wood will serve as representatives of the faculty.
  1. To actively promote diversity among faculty, students, and staff and in the curriculum:


All programs in the Department and the College are approved by the North Carolina Department of Public instruction and are accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). Both the Department of Public Instruction and NCATE rely on knowledge and skill standards in special education developed by the specialized professional associations (SPAs). The curriculum in all of our programs includes diversity standards and skills promoted by the International Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) and the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and are infused though out our teacher preparation work to assure that our candidates demonstrate multicultural competence is a major component of our work. We must document that students demonstrate these prescribed standards. The NC Department of Public Instruction requires these competencies in diversity standards. Competency is assessed through their review of electronic portfolios completed by all teacher candidates. NCATE requires that each of our courses include the knowledge and skills statements in our course syllabi – specifically those standards that will be taught/ addressed in a particular course.

In addition, NCATE accreditation standards for all teacher preparation programs include Standard 4: Diversity. Standard 4 states that the educational unit “designs, implements, and evaluates curriculum and provides experiences for candidates to acquire and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn. Assessments indicate that candidates can demonstrate competencies related to diversity. Experiences provided for candidates include working with diverse populations, including higher education and P–12 school faculty, candidates, and students in P–12 schools.”

To meet NCATE target we are required to document how curriculum, field experiences, and clinical practice promote candidates’ development of knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions related to diversity identified in our conceptual framework. Candidates learn to contextualize teaching and draw effectively on representations from the students’ own experiences and cultures. They challenge students to engage all students, including English language learners and students with exceptionalities, through instructional conversation. Candidates and faculty regularly review candidate assessment data on candidates’ ability to work with all students and develop a plan for improving their practice in our programs.

“One of the most important challenges facing public education is to ensure that the nation’s increasingly young and inexperienced teacher workforce is prepared to meet the academic needs of all students. Teachers must be ready to teach, with the necessary skills needed to support student learning, from the first day they enter the classroom” To address teacher preparation and to assure that teacher candidates are prepared to meet the needs of all students, Stanford University and the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE) formed a partnership to develop and share edTPA,
“The edTPA gives teacher preparation programs access to a multiple-measure assessment system aligned to state and national standards – including Common Core State Standards and the Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) – that can guide the development of curriculum and practice around the common goal of making sure new teachers are able to teach each student effectively and improve student achievement.” As the College of Education undertakes full implementation, the same diversity/ multicultural standards required by CEC and NAEYC will be assessed.
During the 2013-14 Academic year, the Department completed three faculty searches. There was a search to replace retiring chairperson, Dr. Lee Sherry. Two faculty searches, one in the area of Special Education and one in the area of Academically or Intellectually Gifted were completed as well. All three Search Committees selected highly qualified personnel. The Faculty Recruitment plan assures that the Department is adhering to all of the University’s Affirmative Action procedures.. All members of each search committee must also participate in specialized training to assure selection of candidates who possess ability to contribute to the College’s diversity efforts.

  1. To create a flexible, responsive culture that uses effective review and assessment as the basis for improvement:


The Department of Special Education and Child Development relies on the principles of Continuous Quality Enhancement as outlined by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). We try to adhere to the SACS Principles of Institutional Effectiveness (2008). Specifically, for each degree granting or licensure or certificate program, the Department “demonstrates that each program is approved by the faculty and the administration, and (b) establishes and evaluates program and learning outcomes.”
The tradition of shared governance recognizes the importance of both faculty and administrative involvement in the approval of educational programs. Approval by the faculty ensures that programs contain appropriate courses reflecting current knowledge that are appropriate for students enrolled. Approval by the administration affirms that programs are consistent with the mission of the department and the college. The expectation is that the department engages in ongoing planning and evaluation to ensure that each program develops and assesses student learning outcomes.

Program and learning outcomes are based on faculty’s knowledge of the content of the discipline as well as in the expectations for performance consistent the mission of the college and the department. Learning outcomes specify the knowledge, skills, and attitudes students are expected to attain the program. Methods to evaluate student achievement are appropriate to special education and child development and consistent over time to enable our program personnel to evaluate cohorts of students who complete the program. The results of this evaluation affirm the department’s and program’s success at achieving our goals and are used to inform decisions about curricular and programmatic revisions. Annually in the spring, program and student learning outcomes are assessed, documented and revised as appropriate.

We have an established a process for developing and approving educational programs. We have identified appropriate program and learning outcomes for our programs, including majors, minors, and distance-learning programs. On an annual basis, faculty members in each program area evaluate the extent to which students achieve expected outcomes. Based on the annual review, faculty members recommend strategies to enhance student achievement.
This year, at the request of Academic Affairs, the Department established a Student Learning Outcomes Assess Plan and Reports Review Team. All program reports completed for 2012-13 were assessed based on defined criteria. These criteria were established to assist department and program staff improve the quality of the Reports for 2013-14. Recommendations for improvements were made by Review Team members to address any deficiency identified during the department self-evaluation.
These annual reviews of each Program are documented in minutes from program and departmental faculty meetings. All Student Learning Outcome data is included in Reports and submitted to the College’s Assessment Coordinator. These reports are also included as part of the Department Annual Report submitted to the Dean, College of Education and the Provost, Academic Affairs.


  1. Other:

B. MAJOR NEW ACTION STEPS PLANNED TO ACHIEVE GOALS IN 2010-2015 STRATEGIC PLAN

Describe major new action steps planned (if any) to achieve goals in the 2010-2015 Strategic Plan. (Note: this section was included in the event that major new action steps became necessary after the 2010-2015 Strategic Plan was developed. For most units/depts./colleges, this section will be blank.)




C. ANNUAL EVALUATIONS BY UNIT


Briefly describe any annual evaluations conducted by units/departments/colleges to assess outcomes that are not included in the unit/department/college’s 2010-2015 Strategic Plan (.e.g., scholarly productivity.)

The Department of Special Education and Child Development continues to implement and fine tune the Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan for each of the academic programs in the Department. In this continuous quality improvement process, the Department reports annually:

Student Learning Outcomes: Knowledge, skills or ability assessed in multiple areas

Effectiveness Measures: The instrument, exam, project, paper, presentation, etc., used to gauge acquisition of the student learning outcome

Methodology: Methods used to administer the assessment and collect, analyze and disseminate the assessment data.

Performance Outcome: The percentage of students assessed that need to demonstrate competency in the student learning outcome to satisfy the expectations of the department/ program faculty

Assessment Data: Changes/ Improvements that were made on the basis of assessment data

Data are reviewed and reported in the spring of the year for the previous calendar year in each of the following academic programs:

Bachelor of Arts in Special Education: General Curriculum

Bachelor of Arts in Special Education: Adapted Curriculum

Bachelor of Arts in Special Education/ Elementary Education

Bachelor of Arts in Birth Through Kindergarten

Graduate Certificate in Special Education General Curriculum

Graduate Certificate in Special Education Adapted Curriculum

Graduate Certificate in Special Education Academically or Intellectually Gifted

Graduate Certificate in Special Education Autism Spectrum Disorders

Graduate Certificate in Child and Family Studies

Master of Arts in Teaching Special Education General Curriculum

Master of Arts in Teaching Special Education Adapted Curriculum

Master of Arts in Child and Family Studies/ Birth Through Kindergarten

Master of Education Special Education

Master of Education Special Education Academically or Intellectually Gifted

Master of Education Child and Family Studies

Doctor of Philosophy Special Education

As noted above, the Department of Special Education and Child Development relies on the principles of Continuous Quality Enhancement as outlined by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). We try to adhere to the SACS Principles of Institutional Effectiveness (2008). Specifically, for each degree granting or licensure or certificate program, the Department “demonstrates that each program is approved by the faculty and the administration, and (b) establishes and evaluates program and learning outcomes.”

The tradition of shared governance recognizes the importance of both faculty and administrative involvement in the approval of educational programs. Approval by the faculty ensures that programs contain appropriate courses reflecting current knowledge that are appropriate for students enrolled. Approval by the administration affirms that programs are consistent with the mission of the department and the college. The expectation is that the department engages in ongoing planning and evaluation to ensure that each program develops and assesses student learning outcomes.
Program and learning outcomes are based on faculty’s knowledge of the content of the discipline as well as in the expectations for performance consistent the mission of the college and the department. Learning outcomes specify the knowledge, skills, and attitudes students are expected to attain the program. Methods to evaluate student achievement are appropriate to special education and child development and consistent over time to enable our program personnel to evaluate cohorts of students who complete the program. The results of this evaluation affirm the department’s and program’s success at achieving our goals and are used to inform decisions about curricular and programmatic revisions. Annually in the spring, program and learning outcomes are assessed, documented and revised as appropriate.
We have an established a process for developing and approving educational programs. We have identified appropriate program and learning outcomes for our programs, including majors, minors, and distance-learning programs. On an annual basis, faculty members in each program area evaluate the extent to which students achieve expected outcomes. Based on the annual review, faculty members recommend strategies to enhance student achievement.

These annual reviews are documented in minutes from program and departmental faculty meetings. All Student Learning Outcome data is included in Reports and submitted to the College’s Assessment Coordinator. These reports are also included as part of the Department Annual Report submitted to the Dean, College of Education and the Provost, Academic Affairs.

D. EXAMPLES OF DATA-BASED IMPROVEMENTS DURING THE YEAR


Describe 3 examples of how the unit/department/college has used assessment data for the purpose of improvement during the year.

  1. The College of Education is implementing the Education Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA) that will replace all of our program’s Electronic Evidences that have been required documentation of successful student performance by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction’s electronic portfolio in TaskStream. The edTPA is a nationally available performance assessment of readiness to teach for beginning teachers. The assessment is designed with a focus on student learning and principles from research and theory. Successful teachers:

  • Develop knowledge of subject matter, content standards and subject specific pedagogy

  • Develop and apply knowledge of varied students’ needs

  • Consider research and theory about how students learn

  • Reflect on and analyze evidences of the effects of instruction on student learning

As a performance-based assessment, edTPA is designed to engage candidates in demonstrating their understanding of teaching and student learning in authentic ways in three areas of student learning: (1) planning, (2) assessment, and (3) Instruction. Fifteen rubrics will be implemented throughout our initial licensure programs to document evidence of teaching practice.



  1. Some students who enter our programs, do not demonstrate proficiency in professional writing. The Special Education and the Child and Family Development Programs will continue to fine-tune rubrics to assess the effectiveness of the rubrics to assure students demonstrate professional writing proficiency.



E. ASSESSMENT OF EVALUATION METHODS


Comment on the strengths and weaknesses of unit/department/college’s assessment methods and describe plans (if any) to strengthen outcomes assessment during the coming year.

Data for the each of the Department’s programs were collected each semester during the year. At the end of the academic year, data were compiled into Student Learning Outcome Assessment Plan Reports for each academic Program. Departmental faculties are involved in the process of implementing the Department’s programs to reflect 21st Century Professional Teaching Standards and the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction Specialty Standards. Throughout 2013-2014 as Program faculty members proceeded with the documentation of Student Learning Outcomes in conjunction with Electronic Evidences required by the Department of Public Instruction. At the end of the academic year, faculty members reviewed and analyzed Student Learning Outcome data from each program based on 21st Century Professional Teaching Standards and the North Carolina’s specialty standards and indicators guiding each program.




REQUIRED ATTACHMENTS TO 2013-14 ANNUAL REPORT




  1. ANNUAL PROGRESS ASSESSMENT OF PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES FOR 2010-2015 STRATEGIC PLAN GOALS: After completing sections III I. and III J. of your 2010-2015 Strategic Plan (i.e., the annual report section of the strategic plan template), attach the entire 2010-2015 Strategic Plan to the annual report.



  1. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT DATA: Attach a 2013-14 Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan and Report for each undergraduate and graduate degree program and certificate program, stand alone minor, and distance education program offered online only by each department. Colleges that do not submit the required Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plans and Reports will be contacted by the Office of Academic Affairs.



  1. (FOR DEANS AND ASSOCIATE PROVOSTS ONLY) MEMORANDUMS TO DEPARTMENT AND UNIT HEADS: Deans and associate provosts are to attach copies of their written feedback to department and unit heads on the status of outcomes assessment in the department or unit, and identifying any areas meriting priority attention in the coming year.



  1. (ONLY APPLICABLE IF ATTACHED) INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS REPORT ASSESSMENT FINDINGS:

Attach the 2013-14 Institutional Effectiveness Report template with assessment findings. This report includes assessment findings of units that directly support the institutional mission and goals.

  1. (FOR DEANS AND ASSOCIATE PROVOSTS ONLY) OPTIONAL STRATEGIC PLAN SCORECARD EVALUATIONS

Attach the optional 2013-14 Strategic Plan Scorecard evaluation of the annual report. The purpose of this self-evaluation is to strengthen the quality of the annual reports produced by each unit and to produce annual reports that have a long-term impact on successful attainment of goals.

















of 12/23/2016






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