Appendix 4: toolkit of documents and templates (a-m)



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Comments on Element 1:
Most of the users of the services and products can be identified and there are some formal documents describing what is delivered.
There is a range of contact methods used and a feedback log is being maintained.
Current Level: MSB is currently operating at the Developing level.


Element 5: Develop skills needed to sustain service delivery
“When we train new forecasting staff we have an informal process of on the job training to help them to understand the importance of excellent service delivery. Our staff say that they find it useful, but that it is difficult to apply in the real world as they have little contact with our users. Our staff is encouraged to give us their ideas of how we can improve service delivery, but we have received few suggestions.
One idea we are exploring is that of identifying a member of senior staff who will be given the responsibility for delivering improved service delivery, a Champion, who will also be given a budget and some staff to help them. At the moment we are deciding who would be best placed to take on this role.”


Comments on Element 5:
It is clear that the Director of MSB understands the importance of effective service delivery and wants to ensure that it is embedded within his/her NMS.
At the moment there is a little training that takes place and this could be improved, but the intention to identify a Service Delivery Champion should be applauded.
Current Level: MSB is currently operating at the Started level.

Action Plan

Once the discussions were complete, the MSA Service Delivery Champion and the Director of the MSB formulated an Action Plan that would enable them to improve their service delivery. The aim was to identify actions that would allow the MSB to demonstrate at least a Developing level of service delivery for all elements. This process could then be repeated after a period of time, with an ongoing Action Plan enabling steady progress through the different levels of the SDPM.


Action identification number:

Action:

Who is responsible for implementation?

When should the action be complete?

A1.1 -


MSB should take steps to define all their users in a Customer Service Agreement (CSA) or MOU, whichever is most appropriate.

Director of Forecasting

6 months time

A1.2

The use of the feedback log should be encouraged for all feedback received and a clear action associated with each piece of feedback.

Director of Forecasting

3 months time

A1.3

A variety of additional ways for users to contact the MSB such as SMS or fax should be introduced and the new contact methods widely advertised.


Chief Communications Officer

3 months time




A5.1

Regular training workshops on service delivery should be introduced for all staff.

Chief of Training

6 months time

A5.2

The appointment of a Service Delivery Champion should be concluded as soon as possible, with the individual being given the level of resource appropriate to deliver.

Director of MSB

3 months time

A5.3

An improved process for gathering staff suggestions should be developed in consultation with staff and implemented.

Director of Human Resources

6 months time

Appendix 7: action PLAN outline
This Implementation Plan does not propose a rigid template for a service delivery action plan as each NMS or service provider will be at a different stage of development and activity. Nevertheless, the following provides some guidance on the elements that should be included in such an Action Plan.
Current assessment of service delivery progress;
Identification of gaps for each element; and

Identification of specific actions which will be undertaken to reduce each gap. For each action the identification should include:

Relative priority of that action;
Target date for completing the action (with appropriate interim milestones and review points);
Evidence that will be available to demonstrate success on the action;
Senior manager accountable for completing the action;
Resources that will be directed to the action; and
Anticipated future actions to advance to a higher level of the service delivery progress chain.
There are a variety of ways that an action plan containing these elements could be structured. Below are two examples:
Action Plan Example 1
Scope – identification of the organization, including the specific components of the organization covered by the Action Plan (it may not be the entire organization) and the timeframe covered by the plan (the term).
Responsibility – identification of the Service Delivery Champion.
Current Assessment and Gap Identification – using the organization’s Assessment Report, state the development level as per the SDPM (i.e., Undeveloped, Development Started, Development in Progress, Developed or Advanced) for each of the six strategy elements. Identify the development level the organization intends to achieve over the term of the action plan and indicate the relative priority of addressing each element.


Strategy Element:

Current Level:

Target Level

(by end of term of

the Action Plan):


Priority to Address:

Evaluating user needs and decisions










Linking service development and delivery to user needs










Evaluating and monitoring service performance and outcomes










Sustaining improved service delivery










Developing skills needed to sustain service delivery










Sharing best practices and knowledge










Actions to be Undertaken – a listing of projects or activities to be undertaken over the term of the Action Plan. For each project or activity there should be a cross reference to which elements and target levels identified above it will address. There should also be an identification of the lead manager for the project or activity and as detailed as possible listing of the resources that will be assigned to it.



Project (or Activity):

Service element(s) addressed:

Lead manager:

Supporting resources (people and funding):

Target completion date including interim milestones:

Project 1













Project 2













Project 3














Anticipated Next Steps – identification of future intentions to advance the organization to a higher level of service delivery capability. This could include the identification of longer-term projects that will allow the organization to move beyond the target levels covered by this Action Plan.
Action Plan Example 2

Scope – identification of the organization, including the specific components of the organization covered by the Action Plan (it may not be the entire organization) and the timeframe covered by the plan (the term).

Responsibility – identification of the Service Delivery Champion.
Current Assessment, Gap Identification and Action – using the organization’s Assessment Report, for each of the six strategy elements state the development level as per the SDPM (i.e., Undeveloped, Development Started, Development in Progress, Developed or Advanced), followed by an analysis of the gap between the current level and the level the NMS intends to achieve over the term of the action plan, i.e., what is missing between where the organization is today and where it wants to be by the end of the term of the action plan and identify a project or activity to be undertaken to address the gap. For each project or activity there should be an identification of the lead manager for the project or activity and as detailed as possible listing of the resources that will be assigned to it.


Strategy Element:

Current Level:

Gap:

Actions to be Undertaken to Address Gap:

Lead manager:

Resources:

Evaluating user needs and decisions
















Linking service development and delivery to user needs














Evaluating and monitoring service performance and outcomes
















Sustaining improved service delivery
















Developing skills needed to sustain service delivery
















Sharing best practices and knowledge
















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Appendix 8:


Further Reading and links to other documents

Information concerning the “Proceedings of the WMO Regional Association VI (Europe) Conference on Social and Economic Benefits of Weather, Climate and Water Services, Lucerne, Switzerland (PWS-23/ROE-1 (2012)”:



http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/amp/pwsp/documents/PWS_23_ROE-1_en.pdf (publication);

http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/dra/eur/RA6_SEB_Conference.php (Website).

Public Weather Services Socio-Economic Benefits of Weather, Climate and Water Services Webpage: http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/amp/pwsp/SocioEconomicMainPage.htm

PWS competency documents (currently under finalization, link to be provided in due course)

Link to the WMO Strategic Plan: http://www.wmo.int/pages/about/documents/1069_en.pdf

Link to the Global Framework for Climate Services Implementation Plan: http://www.wmo.int/pages/gfcs/ip_en.php

“A Guide to the Implementation of a Quality Management System for National Meteorological and Hydrological Services” (currently under finalization and publication, link to be provided in due course)

Capacity Development Strategy: http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/dra/CDS.html

The “Madrid Conference Statement and Action Plan”, as adopted by the International Conference on Secure and Sustainable Living: Social and Economic Benefits of Weather, Climate and Water Services, Madrid, Spain, 19-22 March 2007: http://www.wmo.int/pages/themes/wmoprod/documents/madrid07_ActionPlan_web_E.pdf



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Draft Implementation Plan for the WMO Strategy for Service Delivery (Version 2.8)



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