Art as a way of learning®



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CREATIVE DRAMA & IMAGINATION






PATRICIA PINCIOTTI, ED. D.


ART AS A WAY OF LEARNING®



CREATIVE DRAMA & IMAGINATION:

TRANSFORMING IDEAS INTO ACTION

By Helane S. Rosenberg

Holt, Rinehart & Winston

1986

CREATIVE DRAMA


is an improvisational, non-exhibitional, process-oriented form of drama

where participants are guided by a leader to imagine, enact and reflect

on human experiences real and imagined.



PLAY - DRAMA – THEATRE CONTINUUM




Play Creative Drama Theatre



I

PERCEPTION

IMAGE

CONSTRUCTION



IMAGING

PRODUCTION



IMAGINATION

Internal Memories


and Feelings

External Experiences


in the World
MAGINATION IN ACTION


TRANSFORMATIONSSSSSS

C
MASTERY


REATIVE DRAMA FRAMEWORK
Rutgers Imagination Method by Helane S. Rosenberg

STARTERS


STARTERSThe comprise the elements of drama/theatre

skills and imagery abilities, providing experiences in multi-sensory

imagery, retrieval and manipulation of images, observation, vocal and language production, physicalization, characterization, and cooperation. Activities focus on one aspect of drama/theatre and develop knowledge and skills that will be combined and transformed into dramas.







Introduction/

Transitions: Relaxation, sensory awareness, observation, and guided imagery





  • Check room for comfort

  • Minimize distractions

  • Be aware of participants’ tension level

  • Adjust guiding lines as needed

  • Speak in a calm, even manner

  • Provide positive encouragement

  • Look for signs of relaxation

  • Do not assume anything

  • Be sensitive to the modality strengths of each participants

  • Challenge participants to use their senses to re-experience

  • Do sensory awareness often; observation takes practice

  • Emphasize all the imagery modalities; taste, touch, sight, smell, sound, and movement

  • Vary the exercises





Object/

Props






  • Maintain a playful attitude

  • Encourage participants to attend to sensory details

  • Assist the participants in generating many uses for an object


  • Help P make the connection between the object and the image

  • Emphasize the potential of objects and props as a stimulus for drama

  • Collect objects with interesting sensory qualities

  • Find dramatic and thought–provoking props





Movement/

Pantomime





  • Use movement vocabulary

  • Connect elements of dance to kinesthetic images

  • Follow a similar format for the movement lessons

  • Encourage experimentation with the element presented

  • Utilize the basic dance pattern to facilitate expression

  • Begin with familiar activities

  • Encourage participants to show, not tell

  • Provide opportunities to work in pairs and groups

  • Strengthen the imagination/action connection by asking them to reflect on what they have just done

  • Emphasize articulation of gesture + movement

  • Avoid guessing games






Sound/

Speech






  • Focus initially on listening and imitating

  • View sound/speech in a context larger than just verbal

  • Be a good listener

  • Provide a variety of objects, instruments, and music for sound stimulus and creation

  • Emphasize the tone and textural quality of sounds, music and words

  • Build the talk-and-listen pattern




Person/

Character





  • Develop a keen sense of observation yourself

  • Help participants attend to detail and observe people’s unique characteristics

  • Encourage participants to see the character in their mind’s eye

  • Emphasize fluency of ideas

  • Steer participants away from stereotypic character images

  • Assist participants in exploring character through prop and action






Sequence/

Story





  • Begin sequencing familiar activities first

  • Provide opportunities to tell stories with pictures, sounds, and words

  • Coach the participants to articulate the steps in a sequence

  • Look for the inherent logic in all sequences

  • Develop your own skills as a storyteller

  • Think of these exercises as precursors to play writing






Design/

Environment




  • Pay attention to perceptual features

  • Provide experiences with the visual arts

  • Develop spatial awareness through manipulation of objects

  • Help participants coordinate their images and actions

  • Ask many questions to help participants clarify images

  • Work toward the group images




TRANSFORMATIONS Individuals become members of a dramatic ensemble where life events are transformed into stories to be enacted. Each category advances ensemble ideas as the group works to develop a collective place, a collaborative plot, a combined spectacle. Theatrical conventions and principles of dramatic structure are explored.






Self As Character


  • Encourage flexibility and elaboration

  • Point out unique or novel images/action

  • Encourage observers to pinpoint specific characteristics

  • Help participants articulate the changes that occur from self to character

  • Be interested in how participants generated images

  • Seek out personal images

  • Allow for laughs





Events/

Stories

into Plots


  • Encourage idea hitch hiking

  • Require participants to put ideas into action

  • Encourage personal images through relaxation and guided journeys

  • Ask specific questions about the plot

  • Discuss the various stimuli and how they affected the plot

  • Discuss the distinctions between real-life experience and the enactment

  • Encourage them to articulate connections between image and the action

  • Help them note similarities and differences between enactments5






Place Becomes Setting


  • Adjust activities to accommodate the unique ethnic, cultural, or geographic features of the group

  • Encourage them to show, not tell

  • Emphasize the importance of details and specific actions
  • Encourage flexibility from the familiar to the fantastical


  • Allow time to plan so all members of the group “see” the set

  • Encourage the use of props and objects to create the set

  • Check the groups’ feelings as you manipulate mood

  • Focus evaluation on how they negotiated the group image

  • Help the audience become active observers






Adding Conflict


  • Ask participants to articulate their motivation

  • Encourage divergent ways to show the vertical conflicts

  • Explore the range of conflicts

  • Be sensitive to the range of feelings expressed

  • Encourage participants to consider conflicts in simple situations

  • Have participants exaggerate the climax or tension

  • Remember, conflicts are not always tragic or violent






Creating Spectacle


  • Always consider the audience

  • Plan ahead

  • Think big; you can always pare it down

  • Encourage elaborate, original ideas and flexible problem-solving

  • Clarify images often

  • Check to see if the actual creation matches the image

  • Help participants keep in touch with their feelings



MASTERY

Drama work at this level takes on unique characteristics and develops in an infinite number of directions, mirroring the dramatic skills and imaginative ideas of its participants, as well as reflecting some ideal, cohesive connection between imagination and action. Aspects of Mastery include:

  • Group works as a cohesive unit

  • Individuals within the group demonstrate meta-cognition


  • Drama emerge from a strong, unifying theme or image

  • Group process, actions and drama exhibit originality


INTERNAL CONNECTIONS EXTERNAL

Dramatic Behavior skills, skills in use of props, movement, pantomime, sound, speech, character, story-making

Theatre skills modeled after director, actor, playwright, designer, critic

Integrate principles of dramatic structure

Negotiation/ coordination with group

Work with theatre conventions, Attention to audience


SELF AS IMAGE


COMPRESSED REHEARSAL
VIEWING WORLD AS MATERIAL FOR DRAMA
KNOWING THAT YOU KNOW ABOUT CONNECTIONS
COLLABORATIVE CONNECTIONS
THIRD EYE – SENSE OF AUDIENCE: SIMULTANEOUSLY DOING AND MONITORING

Rich storehouse of multi-sensory images

Fluent, vivid controllable flexible images

Variety of imagery manipulations strategies

Storehouse of images shared with others

Select and reject images



STARTERS




NAME OF EXERCISE




CATEGORY


IMAGERY STRATEGIES


DRAMATIC BEHAVIORS


Number of Participants:

Materials needed:


DIRECTIONS:



GUIDING LINES:




NOTES:


MODIFICATIONS:



TRANSFORMATIONS



CATEGORY


NAME OF ACTIVITY


THEATRE PERSPECTIVE



DISCUSSION




PROCEDURES




EVALUATION


EXTENSIONS


STARTER IDEAS…

Introduction/

Transitions: Relaxation, sensory awareness, observation, and guided imagery




Object/

Props





Movement/

Pantomime






Sound/

Speech







Person/

Character






Sequence/

Story






Design/

Environment


TRANSFORMATION IDEAS….





Self As Character






Events/

Stories

into Plots






Place Becomes Setting






Adding Conflict







Creating Spectacle








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