Awareness, Mystery and Value (amv) 2011



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Awareness, Mystery and Value (AMV) 2011


Key Stage 1 Unit 3: Why are some stories special? [C&F]

This unit explores how religions and beliefs express values and commitments in a variety of creative ways.

About this example

This series of approximately 11 lessons is intended to provide a set of learning activities in RE for a Year 2/3 class. It was written by Rosemary Richardson (Keinton Mandeville Primary School) and Dave Francis (Associate Adviser).

The focus here is on investigating stories through which Christians and Jews express their beliefs and values to others and how these special stories may influence theirs and others lives.

The programme of learning aims to engage pupils through activities that may, e.g:



  • grab attention, produce amazement, engage imagination or create a sense of wonder;

  • offer an authentic experience or encounter, which challenges their own views and extends their understanding of others;

  • introduce something new that they feel impelled to share with others; or help them to see the significance of something already familiar.

Where the example fits into the curriculum

This example connects with Areas of Enquiry C (Forms of expressing meaning) and F (Values and commitments).

It terms of ‘experiences and opportunities’, the example connects with ‘Literacy‘ and ‘exploring the connections between religious education and other subject areas, such as PSHE. It makes cross-curricular connections with art, drama, geography, history and literacy.


Prior Learning

In Unit 4, pupils have had some experience of the Jewish faith. They have been able to identify feelings and experiences associated with belonging to a Jewish family. They have described the purposes of practices carried out at Shabbat. Most of the children will have heard some of the stories that Jesus told and will have heard the world ‘parable’.



Featured Religions / Beliefs

Focus ‘Key Concepts’

Christianity

AT 1: Learning ABOUT religion and belief

AT 2: Learning FROM religion and belief

Judaism

A. Beliefs, teachings and sources




D. Identity, diversity and belonging




Islam

B. Practices and ways of life




E. Meaning, purpose and truth




Hinduism

C. Forms of expressing meaning



F. Values and commitments





Key Question: Why are some stories special?


Supplementary Questions

  1. What stories and books are special to me and my family?

  2. What stories and books are special to people within religions and beliefs?

  3. How are stories told and books used within religions and beliefs?

  4. What do some stories and books say about how people should live?

Resources

The following texts and e-resources have been used for the sample learning activities below. Teachers are, of course, free to vary the resources suggested here to suit their pupils.



  • RE:quest on the Bible: http://request.org.uk

  • Bibles

  • Hartmann, B. and KK Nagy, 2008, The Lion Storyteller Bible, Lion Hudson.

  • Stop Look Listen: Animated Bible Stories, Programme 2, Jesus the Storyteller, Channel 4 Schools. Available to those who have registered on 4OD: www.channel4.com/programmes/stop-look-listen-animated-bible-stories/4od#2929264 Examples include: The Good Samaritan, The Lost (Prodigal) Son.

  • RE:online information on visiting a synagogue: www.reonline.org.uk/specials/places-of-worship/judaism.htm

  • Short film of a visit to Exeter synagogue: www.reonline.org.uk/specials/places-of-worship/judaism_video.htm

  • BBC information about the Synagogue: www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/judaism/worship/synagogue_1.shtml

  • Jewish, Muslim artefacts, especially – Hebrew Bible, Qur’an and Qur’an stand.
  • Mezuzah box templates: https://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/jewish-mezuzah-scroll-cover-template-6173659


  • BBC class video clips: e.g. on Muhammad www.bbc.co.uk/learningzone/clips/314.html

  • BBC clip on ’The Qur’an: a guide for life’: www.bbc.co.uk/learningzone/clips/4219.html

  • Recitation of the Qur’an. There are a number to choose from at http://quranicaudio.com

  • Good Learning in RE films: ‘A Slave Set Free – Muslim Story for 5-7 year olds: www.reonline.org.uk/good-learning-in-re/

  • Grimmitt, Grove, Hull & Spencer. 1991. Gift to the Child: The Story of Bilal: series available from Articles of Faith.

  • Fiona Moss (ed.) 2010. Opening Up Islam
    and Opening Up Hinduism; both RE Today.

  • RE:ONLINE: ‘What can I learn from the story behind Diwali? www.reonline.org.uk/learning-inner/?id=17255




Learning Outside the Classroom

If possible, arrange a visit for the class to a synagogue.

There are also opportunities for visitors, such as a local minister or other representatives of the Christian or Jewish faiths, to bring their experience of the outside world into the classroom.


Expectations: ‘C&F’ are the focus areas of enquiry identified on the previous page.

By the end of this sequence of learning:

All Pupils (Level 2):

Most Pupils (majority class expectation – Level 3):


Some Pupils (Level 4):

C2 say what some Christian and Jewish symbols and stories stand for and say what some of the art and stories are about.

C3 use religious words to describe some of the different ways in which people show their beliefs.

C4 describe how religious beliefs, ideas and feelings are expressed in a range of styles and suggest what they mean.

F2 talk about what is important to them and to others with respect for their feelings.

F3 link things that are important to them and other people with the way they think and behave.

F4 ask questions about the moral decisions they and other people make, and suggest what might happen as a result of different decisions, including those made with reference to religious beliefs/values.

These statements are taken from the ‘Can-do’ levels published on the AMV website at: http://amv.somerset.gov.uk/



Introduction and links to cross-curricular curricular learning strategies
This scheme of learning was built around three planning questions:


  1. What are we trying to achieve?

  2. How do we organise learning to achieve our aims?

  3. How well are we achieving our aims?




Key Question: Why are some stories special?

Supplementary Questions: (a) What stories and books are special to me and my family? (b) What stories and books are special to Christians? (d) What does the Bible say about how people should live?


Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 1

Pupils will:



  • explore special books and explain why they are special;

  • learn that books can be special for different reasons;

  • learn that the Bible is special to Christians.

1. Introduce the main question for the children’s investigation over this term: Why are some stories special?

Ask pupils to bring in (or think of) a book that is special to them. Ask them questions about it: when they got the book, why they were given the book, what it means to them.

Show them a Bible and ask them why this might be special and to whom.

Use RE:Quest video on The Bible (see resources) and ask the children to say what they remember about different stories in the Bible and what Christians say about the Bible. Ask them some further questions: 1. Why do Christians read the Bible? 2. How do Christians decide what is right and wrong? 3. What things help you to decide what is right and wrong?

Ask children to draw the cover of their special book and complete a sentence: ‘This book is special to me because ...’

Give them a copy of a Bible cover and ask them to complete a sentence: ‘This Book is special to Christians because ...’



Pupils:
  • use religious words to describe some of the different ways in which people show their beliefs (C3);


  • link things that are important to them and other people with the way they think and behave (F3).

Key vocabulary:

Belief, value, special, baptism, Christians.

----

In preparation for this lesson invite the children to bring in a book that has meaning for them.



Have a collection of different books including a Bible.

Invite the local vicar or minister in to talk about the importance of the Bible to Christians in the next lesson.






Key Question: Why are some stories special?

Supplementary Questions: (b) What stories and books are special to people within Christianity? (c) How are stories told and books used within Christianity? (d) What do some stories and books say about how people should live?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 2

Pupils will:



  • identify the Bible as being of value and importance to Christians and suggest reasons for this;

  • learn that stories in the Bible are important to Christians because they give them examples of how to live their lives;

  • talk about their own knowledge of the Bible.

2. Remind class about last week’s lesson. What are we learning?

Remind children of the books that they said were special to them.

Invite the local vicar or minister to talk about the importance of the Bible to Christians, including the idea that the Bible is a special book for Christians as it gives Christians lessons on how to live their lives. Ask the children to think of any stories they may know from the Bible that we could learn from.

Read one of these stories. Pick one that has a child friendly text. A film could be used (see Resources), or ask the Vicar/minister to tell the story, e.g., The Good Samaritan, The Lost (Prodigal) Son, The Sower and the Seed.

Ask children if they know the word for these stories that Jesus told [parable]. Explain (or ask the Vicar to explain) that a parable is a special sort of story that can teach us something important about how to live a good life.

Ask children to talk to the person next to them about why such stories might be important to Christians and other people, and to report back to the whole class on their best reasons. If no one thinks of it, explain that one reason the parables are important to Christians is that they were told by Jesus and that Jesus is believed to be ‘the son of God’, or ‘God in human form’.

Ask children to write a sentence saying what they think people can learn from the story that they have heard. What is the message about how people might think / behave?

Cross-curricular links: Geography: Locate on a map where the bible stories take place. History: When were these stories written?


Pupils:

  • say what a Christian story might be about (C2);

  • talk about what is important to them and to others with respect for their feelings (F2);

  • link things that are important to them and other people with the way they think and behave (F3).

Key vocabulary:

Parable. Samaritan, Levite, Priest, prodigal, vicar, minister.

----

Have copies of the story you want to read, e.g., from the Lion Storyteller Bible. Have an atlas or map to hand to locate the countries the stories come from.



4OD video: Jesus the Storyteller or on Channel 4 Video/DVD.




Key Question: Why are some stories special?

Supplementary Questions: (b) What stories and books are special to Jews? (c) How are stories told and books used within Judaism? (d) What do some stories and books say about how people should live?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 3

Pupils will:



  • identify the Torah as being of value and importance to Jews;
  • recognise what the Torah looks like and when it is used;


  • learn that the Torah is an important book to Jews as the Bible is important to Christians;

  • learn about Jewish artefacts.

3. Remind the class about last week’s lesson. Ask them for reminders of what they are learning.

Visit a synagogue (or have artefacts to hand to explore and talk about and a short film of a synagogue to show – see Resources). Explain, or ask the synagogue guide to explain, why the Torah is important to Jewish people. [e.g., Guidance from G-d, lessons on how to live their lives.]

If possible, give children the opportunity to see the actual Torah scrolls in the synagogue, or facsimile scrolls from the artefact collection.

Explain that Torah means ‘Law’, ‘Instruction’ or ‘Teaching’ and the first five books of the Hebrew (and Christian) Bible are in the Torah. Explain that many Jews (and Christians and Muslims) believe that the Torah was inspired by G-d and brought to people by Moses. It contains many famous stories: Adam and Eve, Noah, Abraham, Joseph, how Moses led his people out of slavery in Egypt and so on.

Ask your synagogue guide to tell one of these stories and to say what it may teach Jewish people today. Ask the children for their own reflections and questions about the story.

Ask the children to look at pictures of Jewish artefacts and to identify them, saying what they symbolise / stand for. Differentiate the cloze procedure activity.

Ask the children to reflect on the synagogue / the artefacts and to talk about why some things are important to Jewish people. Ask: what are the things that are important to them?


Pupils:

  • say what some Jewish symbols and stories stand for and say what some of the art and stories are about (C2);
  • talk about what is important to them and to others with respect for their feelings (F2).


Key vocabulary:

synagogue, Magen David, ark, Torah, scrolls, prayer, temple in Jerusalem, Ten Commandments, bimah, Shabbat, yad, kippah, prayer shawl, menorah, hanukiah, Hanukah.

-----

Artefacts can usually be borrowed from a local RE Centre.



RE:ONLINE offers guidance on visits to places of worship (see Resources).

Note that Jewish people generally write ‘G-d’ instead of the full spelling, in order to avoid misuse of G-d’s Name and breaking the 3rd Commandment.






Key Question: Why are some stories special?

Supplementary Questions (b) What stories and books are special to Christians and Jews? (c) How are stories told and books used within Judaism? (d) What do some stories and books say about how people should live?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 4

Pupils will:



  • identify the Torah as being of value and importance to Jews and suggest reasons for this;

  • learn there are similarities between Christianity and Judaism;
  • learn that both faiths have special books through which they learn to live their lives.





4. Remind the class about last week’s lesson. Ask them for reminders of what they are learning.

Remind them about the important the Torah and ask: What do they remember about it? How is it used?

Explain the link between the Bible and the Torah. How are they the same / different. List suggestions on the board for reference.

Tell them the story of Adam and Eve in the Garden, e.g., ‘A Sad Day’ in the Lion Storyteller Bible. Explain that some people believe that the story of Adam and Eve really happened as an historical event; but many believe that the story is intended to show something about human beings and the world we live in.

Ask the children about the story: how does it start? How does the end come about? Who is the worst behaved character? What is
G-d like in the story? Does it say something about G-d’s justice’? Does G-d live up to the promise made at the start of the story? What are the people like? What do the children think might be important in this story?

Explain some of the messages that Jews and Christians might find underlying the story, e.g., human beings can be tricked; human beings find it hard to be obedient; human beings often do the wrong thing; life can be hard; human beings have made a mess of G-d’s good world etc.

If the story says something about how human beings behave in the world, what do the children say might be done about it?

Provide the children with a picture of the story and ask them to write a caption underneath which might explain it.



Pupils:

  • say what the Jewish / Christian story of Adam and Eve is about (C2);

  • talk about what is important to them and to others with respect for their feelings (F2);
  • link things that are important to them and other people with the way they think and behave (F3).


Key vocabulary:

Bible, Torah, Judaism, Christianity, religion, faith, justice, promise. good, evil, God [Jews often write this as G-d’ to avoid any blasphemous use of the word], Satan.

----

Lion Storyteller Bible.






Key Question: Why are some stories special?

Supplementary Questions: (b) What stories and books are special to Christians and Jews? (c) How are stories told and books used within Judaism? (d) What do some stories and books say about how people should live?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 5

Pupils will:



  • learn about the importance of Moses to Jews, Christians and Muslims;

  • learn about the commandments;

  • learn about the Mezuzah holder and scroll;

  • make their own rules for living a good life.

5. Remind class about last week’s lesson. Ask them for reminders of what they are learning. Can they name the Torah, the Hebrew Bible, The Christian Bible? Can they say what Jews and Christians might be learning from their special books?

Explain that for Jews and Christians (and Muslims), Moses was an important figure. He is believed to be a prophet. Stories about him are in the Torah. Moses led the Hebrew people out of slavery in Egypt and led them for 40 years towards the Land he believed G-d had promised them. In that time he brought them G-d’s Commandments. In all there are 613, but Ten in particular have become well known as a guide for living a Good Life. A few of these are to do with how we treat G-d, and the rest are about how we treat each other. Explain that for many Jewish people, including Jesus, the commandments can be summed up as: ‘love G-d with all your heart’ and ‘love your neighbour as yourself’.

What do the children think of these rules?

Show a Mezuzah holder and the compartment in the back containing a small piece of parchment. Explain that Jewish people today nail this to their doorposts as instructed in the Torah and that they touch the box when going in or out. Ask the children what they think might be written on the parchment. Take some suggestions before revealing the Shema prayer and its English translation, e.g., ‘Hear, O Israel, the L-rd is our G-d, the L-rd is One’. Explain that this acts as a reminder of the commandments given by Moses and the promises made by G-d to those who keep them.

Ask the children: what rules for living a good life would they make for themselves as children? Remind them of where rules might be needed: home, the school, the way to school, meeting adults and other children. Ask them to work with a partner to decide on the most important two or three rules and then to share them in the class.

What would they put in a Mezuzah holder? Ask the children to make their own mezuzah scrolls and, if time allows, make Mezuzah holders to put them in.


Pupils:

  • say what some Jewish symbols and stories stand for and say what some of the art and stories are about (C2);

  • talk about what is important to them and to others with respect for their feelings (F2);

  • use religious words to describe some of the different ways in which people show their beliefs (C3);

  • link things that are important to them and other people with the way they think and behave (F3).

Key vocabulary:

Moses, prophet, Torah, slavery, neighbour, commandments, mezuzah, parchment, Shema.

----

Mezuzah boxes can be made out of card (see Resources for templates).







Key Question: Why are some stories special?

Supplementary Questions: (a) What stories and books are special to me and my family? (b) What stories and books are special to Muslims? (c) How are stories told and books used within Islam?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 6

Pupils will:


  • identify the Qur’an as being of value and importance to Muslims and suggest reasons for this;


  • learn how Muslims show respect for the Qur’an;

  • describe different ways in which religious beliefs are expressed.

6. Remind class about the previous lesson and ask such questions as: What are we learning? Who has the Old Testament and New Testament together as their special book?( Christians) Who has the Torah as their special book? (Jews) What are Christians and Jews learning from their books? Explain that this lesson explores another special book called the Qur’an. This is special to Muslims. Muslims use this book to guide and influence their lives.

Display a copy of the Qur’an on a wooden stand and explain who the prophet Muhammad was. See BBC Learning Zone clip on Muhammad. Play a recitation from the Qur’an or the call to prayer. There are a number to choose from at http://quranicaudio.com Ask why Muslims might call people to prayer in this way.

Explain that as the Qur’an contains the words which Muhammad recited, and that this is believed by Muslims to be the word of Allah, it is therefore treated with the greatest respect and reverence.

Ask whether the children and their families have special things that they treat with respect in their homes? Talk with the children their experiences of special belongings/books/ why do they like them? Where do they keep them? How do they treat them?

Show the children the BBC clip, ’The Qur’an: a guide for life’: and ask them to notice how Muslims treat the Qur’an: e.g., where it is placed in the home, how to prepare for reading it, all praying in the same language, and why it is important to them, e.g., it was revealed to Muhammad (pbuh) and not changed by any man.

Ask why reciting and reading the Qur’an is important to Muslims. Ask pupils to write down their most important reason.



Pupils:
  • say what the Qur’an is about (C2);


  • talk about what is important to them and to others with respect for their feelings (F2);

  • describe how religious beliefs, ideas and feelings are expressed in a range of styles and suggest what they mean (C4).




Key vocabulary:

Muhammad (Muslims say ‘Peace Be Upon Him’ – pbuh – when they mention his name), Qur’an, Muslims, recitation, reverence, respect, Allah, prophet, Tawhid, Risalah, Ibadah, Akhirah, revealed, the angel Jibril (Gabriel).

----

BBC Learning Zone clips.



Qur’anic recitations / Call to Prayer.





Key Question: Why are some stories special?

Supplementary Questions: (b) What stories and books are special to Muslims? (c) How are stories told and books used within religions and beliefs? (d) What do some stories and books say about how people should live?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 7

Pupils will:



  • learn about the story of the first Muslim call to prayer;

  • explore the feelings of the characters involved in the story;

  • examine an example of Muslim calligraphy and spot patterns and repeated words;

  • reflect on the story of Bilal and on what might be worth shouting out to people;


  • respond creatively to the key points of the story;

  • ask their own questions about the meanings of the story and the call to prayer.

7. Using ‘The Gift to the Child’ material on ‘The Story of Bilal’, and using the ‘Good Learning in RE’ film, ‘A Slave Set Free’, as a model, tell the story of the first call to prayer, allowing the children to play the parts of Bilal, Ammar, the slave and Abu Bakr.

Ask the children for their ideas about the feelings of those involved in the story and to assemble the puzzle (as in the RE:ONLINE / NATRE downloadable materials). Take the children through each part of the story illustrated by the puzzle pieces.

Play an example of the Call to Prayer (as last lesson) and ask them about the sounds that ‘call’ them to do things on a daily basis.

What do the children think might be worth shouting out every day to help people in their lives? Do they think this would encourage ‘good’ behaviour? Ask them for reasons for their views.

Show pupils the calligraphy in Arabic of the Call to Prayer – see The Gift to the Child Teachers’ Book, p69. Invite them to see patterns in the writing and to identify repeated words.

As suggested in the Good Learning film, ask children to work in different groups to:



  • create one or two pieces of their own puzzle picture showing something (an object) that matters in the story.

  • paint the turning point of the story – when do they think that story ‘changes’?

  • use building bricks to make a model of a mosque. Where would Bilal be standing? Why? Ask them to build another structure that they would choose to stand to ‘call’ out something important to others.
  • write on the speech bubble blanks deciding what they would shout out if they were calling people to prayer. Record their ‘call’ onto the ICT speech bubbles or use digital blue cameras to video their partner ‘calling’ people to prayer.


Explore children’s further questions to close the session.

Pupils:

  • say what some Muslim symbols and stories stand for and say what some of the art and stories are about (C2);

  • talk about what is important to them and to others with respect for their feelings (F2);

  • use religious words to describe some of the different ways in which people show their beliefs (C3);

  • link things that are important to them and other people with the way they think and behave (F3).

Key vocabulary:

witness, Allah, calligraphy, prayer, Bilal, Abu Bakr, slave.

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To prepare for this lesson, watch the ‘Good Learning in RE’ film ‘A Slave Set Free’ found on the RE:ONLINE website (see Resources) and download the supporting material. You will need to make your own six piece puzzle to illustrate the setting of the story (with no people in the picture).



The Gift to the Child has the story of Bilal and accompanying lesson ideas (see Resources).





Key Question: Why are some stories special?

Supplementary Questions: (a) What stories and books are special to me and my family? (b) What stories and books are special to people within religions and beliefs? (c) How are stories told and books used within religions and beliefs? (d) What do some stories and books say about how people should live?

Learning objectives


Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 8

Pupils will:



  • listen to a story about Muhammad (pbuh) and reflect on its meaning;

  • create their own representation of part of the story;

  • take part in a class ‘feast’ to celebrate their participation in the lesson;

  • appreciate that, some people, stories from religious traditions are very special..

8. Explain that a storyteller is coming to the class today..,. leave the room, wrap yourself in a cloak and return as ‘the Storyteller’. Bring a story box with you. Tell the story of ‘The boy who threw stones at trees’, where Muhammad (pbuh) talks gently to a boy who was inadvertently killing the date trees trying to get dates before they were ripe. The owner of the trees forgave the boy when he saw that he understood the Prophet’s words.

Tell the story in the style of ‘godly’ or ‘spirited play’. (NATRE members can see a short film showing this approach at: http://www.natre.org.uk/resources/an-introduction-to-spirited-play/)

At the end of the story, ask some ‘I wonder...’ questions, e.g., ‘I wonder how the farmer felt when he saw what the boy had done to his trees?’

After the discussion, invite the children to create a representation a part of the story. Each child leaves the storytelling circle one by one to make an artistic response to what is, for them, a key part of the story. After 15 or 20 minutes all come back together with their art work.

As suggested in the ‘godly play’ strategy, share a small ‘feast’ together, especially using the dates in the story and thinking about how they are favoured my many Muslims, especially at Ramadan. Provide information about dates for the children and invite them to ask their own questions about the story and the activity before thanking each child individually for their presence at the storytelling.


Pupils:

  • link things that are important to them and other people with the way they think and behave (F3);

  • ask questions about the moral decisions they and other people make, and suggest what might happen as a result of different decisions, including those made with reference to religious beliefs / values (F4).

Key vocabulary:

Qur'an, hadith, forgiveness, Allah, mercy character qualities.

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To prepare for this lesson, put some artefacts into a ‘story box’, e.g., dates, figures made from wood, plastic or polystyrene for the boy and the farmer, fabric for the ground, stones for rocks and a school plant for the tree.



‘The boy who threw stones at trees’ can be found in ‘Opening Up Islam’ (see Resources).

The creative responses might be supported by helpers: TAs or older children.






Key Question: Why are some stories special?

Supplementary Questions: (b) What stories and books are special to people within religions and beliefs? (c) How are stories told and books used within religions and beliefs? (d) What do some stories and books say about how people should live?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 9

Pupils will:


  • engage in the story of Lord Ram and Princess Sita;

  • explore questions of fears and of people that might help;

  • reflect on how stories can help themselves and other people to ‘do the right thing’;

  • consider the consequences of actions;

  • reflect on who or what helps them to be good.

9. Remind pupils that they are investigating the big question: why are some stories special?’

Engage them in the Diwali ‘Story and Movements’ (see Resources: ‘What can I learn from the story behind Diwali?). Explain that the story comes from one of the Hindu Holy Scriptures, called the Bhagavad-Gita. Take the children through the story, with movements, as suggested in the RE:ONLINE learning activities.

Explore questions with pupils concerning (a) fears and (b) who they might go to for help.

Explain that for Hindus and others too, people often help others because it is part of being a member of that community. They may see this as a religious duty or simply a good or right thing to do, but where does this sense of morality come from? Ask the children if they think that stories from different traditions can help people to ‘do the right thing’. Encourage them to give good reasons for their answers.

Ask the children to choose a character from the story and make shadow puppets as in the ‘Opening Up Hinduism’ publication, OR, to re-enact the Story and Movements as an interpretive dance. This could even make a presentation for an assembly or as part of a themed week in a ‘creative’ curriculum.

Invite the children to reflect on the ‘good; and ‘bad’ actions of the characters in the story and to write a bad thing one of the characters might be tempted to do, alongside what they could have done (or did do) that would have been better.

Ask them to think of their own struggle to ‘be good’. As in the ‘Opening Up Hinduism’ booklet, children could draw an outline of themselves and write inside some of the bad things and good things that they might do in a day. Around the outside they could write examples of good deeds they have actually done. Ask them to comment on who helps them to be good.


Pupils:

  • say what a Hindu story is about (C2);

  • talk about what is important to them and to others with respect for their feelings (F2);

  • link things that are important to them and other people with the way they think and behave (F3);

  • ask questions about the moral decisions they and other people make, and suggest what might happen as a result of different decisions, including those made with reference to religious beliefs / values (F4).

Key vocabulary:

Diwali, Holy Scripture, Bhagavad-Gita, temptation, struggle, morality.

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Download the Sensory story of Diwali from RE:ONLINE (see Resources) or use ‘The story of Prince Ram and Princess Sita’ in ‘Opening Up Hinduism’ (see Resources). This contains many more ideas for pupils’ learning according to their ability.







Key Question: Why are some stories special?

Supplementary Questions: (b) What stories and books are special to people within religions and beliefs? (c) How are stories told and books used within religions and beliefs?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 10

Pupils will:



  • reflect quietly on the words of a story from a religious tradition;

  • reflect on the meaning or message of that story;

  • produce their own creative response to the story.

10. Explain that in each of the main religions represented in the UK, stories play a special part. They have been used to teach people about their faith in a way which makes difficult messages easier to understand.

Recap those stories they have looked at, Jewish, Christian, Muslim and Hindu, e.g., Adam & Eve in the Garden of Eden, The Lost (Prodigal) Son, the story of Bilal or Rama and Sita.

Explain that there are moral teachings in all of these stories, i.e., there are messages for people to learn about the right way to live or the best thing to do, and that one way of understanding these messages may be to reflect quietly as the story is read. [This is based on an interpretation of ‘Lectio Divina’– read the full article to get a complete picture of this approach – see References and notes.]

Ask the children to choose from the stories listed above, according to which ones made them think most deeply. Use the ‘blind vote’ method, i.e., ask children to close their eyes and put up their hand for as many of the stories as they like as you mention them. Keep a score of the ‘votes’ and settle on the ONE receiving the most. Then follow the following procedure:

(a) Ask the children to listen silently, perhaps with eyes closed, to each word as you read the chosen story through from a children’s version. Encourage them to listen to the story ‘with their hearts as well as their ears, from a place deep within themselves’. Read slowly, pausing for a few moments at the end of each sentence.

(b) Explain that, after a short period of silence, you are going to read the story again and encourage the children to remember any words or phrases that seem to stand out for them. Re-read the story – again slowly and reflectively.

(c) At the end of the second reading, keep another short period of silence and then ask the children to recall, without speaking aloud, the words that stood out for them and keep those words to themselves.

(d) Provide materials for the children to make collages and ask them to make an individual and creative response to the words they chose, choosing colours and shapes to express their felt response to the story.

(e) Sit alongside individual children and ask them about their collages: what words are they focussing on? Why have they chosen certain colours and shapes? What meaning are they trying to express? What questions were raised for them? [You might ask a TA, if available, to work with some children in this way, so that more individual children have the opportunity to speak about their designs.]


Pupils:

  • say what a story stands for and what it may be about (C2);

  • select some words in a story that may reveal deeply held beliefs (C3);

  • express beliefs, ideas and feelings in their own way and suggest some possible meanings (C4).

Key vocabulary:

Bible, Qur'an, Torah, Bhagavad-Gita, holy, respect, beliefs, values, behaviour.

----

For a description of the ideas underpinning the ‘Lectio Divina’ approach see Prior, L., A. Trevathan and H. Verkest, ‘”Listen carefully, attending with the ear of your heart”: a report on work in progress’, in REsource, 34:2, Spring 2012, Christian Education Publications, pp 16-18.



Have shortened children’s versions of the stories ready.




Key Question: Why are some stories special?

Supplementary Questions: (b) What stories and books are special to people within religions and beliefs? (c) How are stories told and books used within religions and beliefs? (d) What do some stories and books say about how people should live?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 11

Pupils will:


  • complete their collages;

  • recall the books’ that some ‘special stories’ come from;

  • say how beliefs and values can result in certain actions;

  • ask a range of questions about the stories they have been thinking about;

  • recognise their achievements and learn about asking big questions in RE.

11. Allow children some time to finish their collages if needed and remind them that each story they looked at in this unit comes from a special (or ‘holy’) book that people treat with great respect – the Bible, the Torah, the Qur’an and the Bhagavad-Gita. To show respect for their work, make a display of their collages, or photograph it for the school website.

Ask the children, ‘In what ways other than in stories do people show their beliefs and values? Talk with them about actions, and helpful behaviour that reveal people’s beliefs.



    Ask them to write down one thing they could do to express their beliefs and values.

Finally, encourage them to work in pairs or small groups to think up big questions they would like to ask about the stories they have been exploring. Make a class list of the questions and ask them to identify the questions could be answered from the stories themselves and those that need answers that go beyond the stories; and also to identify which questions are easy to answer and which are much harder to answer.

Provide the children with a brief review of their achievements in this unit and remind them that they have deepened their understanding of the key question: why are some stories special? Point out that, as often is the case in RE, it can be good to end with more questions!



Pupils:
  • talk about what is important to them and to others with respect for their feelings (F2);


  • use religious words to describe some of the different ways in which people show their beliefs (C3);

  • link things that are important to them and other people with the way they think and behave (F3).

Prepare materials for children to make individual collages.



RECORD OF ATTAINMENT

KS1 Unit 3: Why are some stories special? (C&F) Year 2/3

All pupils:

(Level 1)

Most pupils - majority class expectation:

(Level 2)



Some pupils:

(Level 3)

C2 say what some Christian and Jewish symbols and stories stand for and say what some of the art and stories are about.

C3 use religious words to describe some of the different ways in which people show their beliefs.

C4 describe how religious beliefs, ideas and feelings are expressed in a range of styles and suggest what they mean.

F2 talk about what is important to them and to others with respect for their feelings.

F3 link things that are important to them and other people with the way they think and behave.

F4 ask questions about the moral decisions they and other people make, and suggest what might happen as a result of different decisions, including those made with reference to religious beliefs / values.













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