Awareness Mystery Value (amv)

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Awareness Mystery Value (AMV)


Key Stage 2 Unit 2: What can we learn from the life and teaching of Jesus? (B&E)

This unit explores aspects of the person, life and teaching of Jesus and how they relate to Christian life, practices, celebrations and the pattern of Christian festivals

About this example

This series of approximately 12 lessons is intended to provide a set of learning activities for a Year 4 class (or may be adapted for Y3). Teachers may decide to cover the Christmas and Easter aspects at the appropriate times in the year.

It was written by Katy Staples (Adviser to Bristol SACRE), Sue Thompson (AST and Y5 teacher at Elmlea Junior School, Bristol) and Dave Francis (Associate Adviser for Religious Education).


Where the example fits into the primary curriculum

This example is likely to be used as a ‘stand-alone’ sequence of learning within a discrete unit of learning for RE or may be used to support a suitable cross-curricular topic.



Essentials for learning and life. This sample scheme will support pupils to learn how to listen attentively, talk clearly and confidently about their thoughts, opinions and ideas (Literacy), investigate and communicate (learning and thinking skills) and work collaboratively towards common goals (social skills).

Prior Learning

Pupils will have some experience of, and practice at being able to put forward a point of view and say why things are important, giving reasons.


Featured Religions / Beliefs

Areas of Enquiry

Christianity

AT 1: Learning ABOUT religion and belief

AT 2: Learning FROM religion and belief




A. Beliefs, teachings and sources




D. Identity and belonging







B. Practices and ways of life



E. Meaning, purpose and truth






C. Forms of expression




F. Values and commitments







Key Question: What can we learn from the life and teaching of Jesus?

Supplementary Questions

  1. Who is Jesus and what does it mean to follow him today?

  2. What did Jesus teach about:
  • Love; Sin, Forgiveness and redemption; Revenge and peace/reconciliation; Greed and giving; Making a difference; Prayer; Faith and hope; Life after death?


  1. What do the narratives of Jesus’ miracles tell us about some of the big questions of life?

  2. Why might Christmas, Lent and Easter be important to ourselves as well as (other) Christians?

Resources

The following texts and e-resources have been used for the sample learning activities below. Teachers are, of course, free to vary the resources suggested here to suit their pupils.

Blaylock, L. (2004) Picturing Jesus: Pack A and B and Fresh Ideas, RE Today Services: http://shop.retoday.org.uk

The Christ we share - CMS, Methodist Church - http://cms-shop.org.uk/p/8788919/the-christ-we-share.html

Draycott, P. Ed. Jesus: His Importance to Believers, RE Today Services: http://shop.retoday.org.uk

Cooling, M. (1998) Jesus Through Art, RMEP. Cooling, M. (2000) Images of Jesus in Art, BBC.



The Parables Project: Exeter Diocese: http://exeter.anglican.org/schools/religious-education-worship/parables-project/

BBC Learning Zone for: The Good Samaritan; The Lost Son; Zacchaeus; The Ultimate Takeaway; Raising the Roof; Looking Rough and The Festival of Easter http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/clips/zy3w2p3



The Lion Storyteller Bible.

Miracles Activity Sheets from the Diocese of Bristol: http://www.bristol.anglican.org/2010/loaves-and-fishes/

Moss, F. (2011) Opening Up Easter, RE Today Services: http://shop.retoday.org.uk


Animated Bible Stories, Channel 4 and The Prodigal Son. These resources may be available for loan from Diocesan Resources Centres.

RE:quest on Greed & Giving (Zacchaeus): http://request.org.uk/teachers/teaching-resources/2015/11/24/zacchaeus-meets-jesus/

Hayes & Sokolov (Directors), (2000) The Miracle Maker’, DVD.




Learning Outside the Classroom

Pupils could have had the opportunity to visit a church or ask a Christian to speak about his/her beliefs about Jesus and what Jesus means to him/her.



Expectations: ‘B & E’ are the focus areas of enquiry identified on the previous page

By the end of this sequence of learning:

All pupils:

Most pupils (majority class expectation):

Some pupils: (G&T Y4s)

B2 talk about some of the things that are the same for different religious people.

B3 describe some of the things that are the same and different for religious people.


B4 use religious language accurately to describe and compare what practices and experiences may be involved in belonging to different religious groups.

E2 talk about some things in stories that make people ask questions.

E3 ask important questions about life and compare their ideas with those of other people.


E4 ask questions about the meaning and purpose of life, and suggest a range of answers, which might be given by them, as well as members of different religious groups.

These statements are taken from the old ‘Can-do’ levels. The new ‘Learning Outcomes’ can be found in the ‘Standards’ section of the new AMV website: http://awarenessmysteryvalue.org




Key Question: What can we learn from the life and teaching of Jesus?

Supplementary Question (a) Who is Jesus and what does it mean to follow him today?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 1


Pupils will:

  • begin to explore who others think Jesus is;

  • begin to explore who they think Jesus is.

Question:

Who is Jesus?

1. Have 6-10 stations around the room with pictures and quotations of Jesus and what people think about Jesus (see p4 & 5 of ‘Jesus: His Importance to believers’ for ideas for quotations).

Ask pupils to work in pairs and to go around the stations gathering information and ideas to complete a KWL about Jesus (Know, Want to know, Learned). Ask then to look out for things that are the same for different Christians.

Feedback their findings to the whole class and discuss what they want to know, know and have learned.

ACTIVITY: Ask pupils to write a poem entitled ‘Who is Jesus?’

They could make this (a) free flowing, (b) acrostic or (c) cinquain form [an increasing syllable count in the first four lines, namely two in the first, four in the second, six in the third, and eight in the fourth, before returning to two syllables on the last line].

PLENARY: Ask those who have finished their poems to read them out to the class and offer some words of explanation.


Pupils:

  • talk about some of the things about Jesus that are the same for different Christians (B2);

  • talk about the views about Jesus that make people ask questions (E2).

Key vocabulary:

Christ, Lord, Messiah.

----

Picturing Jesus: Pack A and B and Fresh Ideas, Lat Blaylock.

The Christ we Share, CMS, Methodist Church.

Jesus: His Importance to believers, Pamela Draycott.

Jesus Through Art, Margaret Cooling.


Key Question: What can we learn from the life and teaching of Jesus?

Supplementary Questions (a) Who is Jesus and what does it mean to follow him today? (b) What did Jesus teach about: Making a difference?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning


Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 2


Pupils will:

  • know the story of the Good Samaritan;

  • explore how Christians might reflect God’s love and compassion in ways that might be costly, difficult or risky;

  • begin to understand that for Christians the love of God is expressed in loving one’s neighbour, regardless of barriers and boundaries.

Question:

What did Jesus teach about love?

2. Introduce the key question: What can we learn from the life and teaching of Jesus?

Show the Good Samaritan clip. [Alternatively, read ‘The Kind Stranger’ from the Lion Storyteller Bible.] Stop the story near the end and ask pupils to reflect on the question, ‘Who does Jesus say we should love?’ What answers can they give at this point?

Ask pupils to work in pairs or groups to suggest answers to the following questions:


  • Why do you think the Priest and Levite didn’t stop?

  • Was the Good Samaritan sensible?

  • What would be a modern equivalent of The Good Samaritan?

After some time collect a selection of answers and display.

Show What Must I do? and explain that it is an artist’s portrayal of the story. Divide the class into four groups and encourage pupils to talk to a partner about a different section of the picture. Collect suggestions and add to the display of pupils’ ideas.

Talk with pupils about the style of the artist’s work and ask them to give their views on how different Christians might interpret the picture.

ACTIVITY: Encourage pupils to use the ideas given in the display of earlier suggestions to EITHER (a) create their own picture showing a key moment from the story OR (b) write a Good Samaritan Rap.

PLENARY: Ask pupils to consider: In what different ways should / could Christians put this story into action today? [What Must I do? refers to this.]


Pupils:

  • talk about some things in the story of the Good Samaritan that make people ask questions (E2);

  • describe some of the things that are the same and different for Christians (B3).

Key vocabulary:

Lord, neighbour, parable, Samaritan, compassion, love, priest, Levite.

----

See the BBC Learning Zone for the story of The Good Samaritan.



The Parables Project: Picture called What Must I do?

The Lion Storyteller Bible.




Key Question: What can we learn from the life and teaching of Jesus?

Supplementary Questions (a) Who is Jesus and what does it mean to follow him today? (b) What did Jesus teach about: Love, Sin, Forgiveness and redemption; Revenge and peace/reconciliation; Faith and hope?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes
Lesson 3

Pupils will:

  • retell the parable of the Lost Son showing an understanding of the main characters;

  • understand how the parable might be interpreted by Christians as showing that forgiveness is a central aspect of God’s love;

  • explore the concepts of sin, repentance, forgiveness, reconciliation and redemption.

Question:


What did Jesus teach about sin, repentance, forgiveness, reconciliation and redemption (coming back to God)?


3. Project the picture The Foolish Father? on screen and give pupils the opportunity to look in silence for 2-3 minutes, trying to answer the questions:

  • What can I see?

  • What do I think is going on?

  • Who are the main characters?

Ask them to share their responses in the class.

Explain that the picture is an artist’s representation of a Bible story and that it is a story told by Jesus to teach important lessons about forgiveness and coming back to God (redemption).

Show BBC clip or DVD asking pupils to note what they think are the key messages in the story.

In pairs, ask pupils to make suggestions on how different people might describe the main characters in the story: the father; the younger son; and the elder son.

Explain that for many Christians, the father represents God, the younger son represents ordinary ‘sinful’ people and the elder son represents those (like the Pharisees in the gospels) who resented Jesus telling ‘sinners’ who ‘repented’ that they would get into the kingdom of God before them.

ACTIVITY: Encourage pupils to imagine that they are the father in the parable. Ask them to draft a letter to their elder son, explaining how he feels and inviting him to join the celebrations. The letter should include some questions for the son to consider. Encourage pupils to compare their drafts and then to re-write a best version, using ideas from others if they wish.

PLENARY: Play the recording of the artist talking about her work – or read her comments in Parables Project sheet 02, p.5.

Return to the key question, asking pupils for their views on what Jesus taught about sin, repentance, forgiveness and redemption.

Ask them: how could you tell by someone’s life that they had taken this story to heart?


Pupils:

  • talk about some things in the story of the Lost Son / Foolish Father that make people ask questions (E2);

  • describe how Christians might, in similar and different ways, reflect Jesus’ teaching in their lives (B3).

  • ask important questions about the big ideas in the story and compare their ideas with those of others (E3).

Key vocabulary:

sin, parable, gospel, compassion, redemption, repentance, reconciliation, forgiveness, prodigal.

----

Note that there is also teaching on love in this parable (More commonly referred to as The Prodigal, or Lost, Son).



See the BBC Learning Zone for the story.

or Animated Bible Stories, The Prodigal Son (Nest Entertainment).

The Parables Project: Picture called The Foolish Father?. NB Teachers’ notes give good background information on the story, including what the artist, Anne House, says about her work.


Key Question: What can we learn from the life and teaching of Jesus?

Supplementary Question (b) What did Jesus teach about: Greed and giving?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes
Lesson 4

Pupils will:

  • begin to understand what Jesus taught about giving and greed;

  • think about their own responses to Jesus’ teachings about giving and greed.


Question:

What did Jesus teach about greed and giving?


4. Show the BBC Learning Zone clip for the story of Zacchaeus.

Ask half the class to watch it so they can explain what this story tells us about Jesus; the other half to watch it so they can explain what this story tells us about Zacchaeus.

Provide an opportunity for pupils to exchange ideas on what they have noticed.

Ask a child (or the teacher or TA) to be Zacchaeus and hot seat ‘him’ about ‘his’ experiences.

Read The Widow’s Coins from The Lion Storyteller Bible pp.134f and invite class participation in the counting.

Ask the class to discuss in pairs:



  • Who does Jesus say gave the most?

  • Was Jesus right?

and to feedback their answers to the whole class.

PLENARY: ask pupils to imagine that they have won the lottery and have a million pounds – they can just spend it all on a new house, holidays etc or they could give half away to help Oxfam and a local charity for children. What should they do?

Ask half of your class to form a ‘Conscience Alley’ with equal numbers on each side, and ask one pupil to walk down the alley to receive advice that the pupils themselves would give. Ask the walker to summarise what they were told.

Then ask the pupils who have been observing to form a new conscience alley – this time they are going to give the advice to a pupil walking down the middle that they think Jesus would give.

Ask the pupil to summarise what they were told and encourage the whole class to compare the different messages.


Pupils:
  • talk about some things in the stories of Zacchaeus and the Widow’s Coins that make people ask questions (E2);


  • ask important questions about life and compare their ideas with those of others (E3).

Key vocabulary:

sin, compassion, repentance, forgiveness, redemption, greed, tax collector, conscience, sacrifice.

----

BBC Learning Zone for the story of Zacchaeus or RE:Quest (see Resources).



The Lion Storyteller Bible.

Key Question: What can we learn from the life and teaching of Jesus?

Supplementary Questions (a) Who is Jesus and what does it mean to follow him today? (b) What did Jesus teach about: Prayer?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 5

Pupils will:



  • understand Jesus’ teaching about how to pray;

  • know the story of the Pharisee and the tax collector praying and why Jesus told it;

  • explore the Lord’s Prayer and begin to understand what it means.

Question:

What did Jesus teach about prayer?

Remind children of the key question: What can we learn from the life and teaching of Jesus?

Explain that Jesus often prayed and that he encouraged his followers to do so also. For most Christians, prayer may be understood as ‘Talking to God’.

In groups on one large piece of paper, ask pupils to note their ideas on: (a) what prayer is; (b) what prayer isn’t; (c) whether there is anywhere a person cannot pray; and (d) whether there are any words that couldn’t be used in prayer.

Ask them to feedback their findings.

Then read the story of the Pharisee and the Tax Collector.

Explain the following ideas (a) Being too big for your boots; (b) Showing humility and forgiveness. Ask pupils to think of examples of each (without naming names, e.g., ‘It’s like when someone...’):.

Ask pupils to role play the body language of both the Pharisee and the Tax Collector and say who the ‘hero’ was.

Show a copy of The Lord’s Prayer on screen and explain that this was a ‘model’ for praying that Jesus taught. Read it through and explain any difficult words.

ACTIVITY: Give a copy of The Lord’s Prayer to each pupil and alongside each line ask them to write their own version of it, e.g. LEAD US NOT INTO TEMPTATION... Help us to avoid doing bad things. Encourage them to add, at the bottom the page, a few questions of their own about the Lord’s Prayer and to compare their questions with those around them.

PLENARY: Ask some pupils to read their version of the prayer, and some of their questions. Return to the key question, noting if pupils’ versions help to answer it and whether their questions help them to think about the meaning of prayer for themselves / Christians.

Play a sung version of The Lord’s Prayer, e.g. Charlotte Church, available with many others on YouTube,


Pupils:

  • describe some of the things about prayer that are the same and different for Christians (B3);

  • talk about some things in the story of the Pharisee and the Tax Collector that make people ask questions (E2);

  • ask important questions about prayer and compare their ideas with those of others (E3).

Key vocabulary:

sin, parable, forgiveness, humility, tax collector, prayer, Pharisee, Lord’s Prayer, temptation.

----

Copy of the Pharisee and the Tax Collector story.



Copies of The Lord’s Prayer prepared so that there is space for the pupils to write their own version alongside each line.

God’s Special Prayer: Marjory Francis and Helen Jenkins.

Key Question: What can we learn from the life and teaching of Jesus?

Supplementary Questions (a) Who is Jesus and what does it mean to follow him today? (b) What did Jesus teach about: Making a difference? (c) What do the narratives of Jesus’ miracles tell us about some of the big questions of life?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 6

Pupils will:



  • describe the events of The Loaves and Fishes story;

  • suggest definitions for the word ‘miracle’;
  • understand what the story shows Christians believe about Jesus/God.


Questions:

What is a miracle?

What do the narratives of Jesus’ miracles tell us about some of the big questions of life?


Explain that you are going to show pupils a film clip of a miracle story from the life of Jesus. Ask pupils if they can suggest a meaning for the world ‘miracle’ and put some key words from their answers up on display.

Show the story of The Ultimate Takeaway from the BBC clip or read or re-tell the story from Luke Chapter 9 or Lion Storyteller Bible – ‘The Marvellous Picnic’.

1st ACTIVITY: Ask pupils to work in pairs or individually on the Miracle Definition Sheet to discuss how the pupils would define a miracle (Sheet 1). Ask for their ideas and questions about the activity. As a whole class, ask pupils for: (a) what they understand by the word ‘Miracle’? (b) some examples of miracles; (c) their ideas on what kind of miracle the Loaves and Fishes story might be; and (d) where on the miracles definition line they would place that miracle.

2nd ACTIVITY: What did the different people do to make sure this miracle happened? The boy, disciples, Jesus, God, the crowd (Sheet 2).

PLENARY: Ask the pupils to offer their reflections on (a) what they think the storyteller was saying about Jesus and (b) what messages this story may have for Christians today.

Point out that, in the story, the boy gave his lunch; what can Christians learn from this, do they think? Ask for their suggestions on what similar and different things people could do to make a difference to the world. Ask: If this miracle is an answer to a question, what might that question be? Ask pupils to write their answers on sticky notes and make a display of them.


Pupils:


  • ask important questions about miracles and compare their ideas with those of others (E3);

  • describe some of the things that are the same and different for people about how to make a difference in the world (B3).

Key vocabulary:

miracle.


----

See the BBC Learning Zone for the story of ‘The Ultimate Takeaway’ – the Feeding of the 5,000.

Lion Storyteller Bible.

Miracles – different definitions activity sheet (Sheet 1).

Who made the miracle happen? (Sheet 2)

Both sheets may be downloaded from the Bristol Diocesan website.




Key Question: What can we learn from the life and teaching of Jesus?

Supplementary Questions (a) Who is Jesus and what does it mean to follow him today? (b) What did Jesus teach about: Sin, Forgiveness and redemption; Faith and hope; Life after death? (c) What do the narratives of Jesus’ miracles tell us about some of the big questions of life?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 7

Pupils will:



  • read and understand stories of Jesus’ miracles;

  • know that the narratives of Jesus’ miracles tell us about some of the big questions of life.

Question:

What do the narratives of Jesus’ miracles tell us about some of the big questions of life?

1ST ACTIVITY: Put children in groups of about 5 and number each group member 1-5. Then ask all the 1s, 2s, 3s etc. to group together. Give each new group a copy of a miracle story (see list on right).

Encourage each group to read and discuss their story and become familiar with it. Ask them to then return to their original groups. Ask pupils numbered 1 to tell their story to the rest of their group, then pupil 2 etc until all members have told their story.

2nd ACTIVITY: Ask pupils to individually choose one of the stories (or another of own choice) and make a story board of the main events with some explanatory sentences.

EXTENSION: ask pupils to say how Jesus performed the miracle according to the story (touch, command, forgiveness etc) and try to explain why Jesus may have chosen to perform that miracle.

PLENARY: Show the BBC ‘Raising the Roof’ clip (the paralysed man lowered through the roof by his friends) and the ‘Looking Rough’ clip (the calming of the storm).

Ask pupils to offer reflections on such questions as:



  • What do these stories say about Jesus and the big questions of life?

  • Do you think this is a ‘true’ story? Did Jesus have the power to do this?

  • Do you think different Christians might interpret these miracle stories in different ways? What alternative ways of looking at them are there?

Pupils:

  • talk about some things in the miracle stories that make people ask questions (E2);

  • ask important questions about miracle stories and compare their ideas with those of others (E3);
  • ask questions about the meaning and purpose of life, and suggest a range of answers, which might be given by them, as well as members of different religious groups (E4).


Key vocabulary:

sin, compassion, forgiveness.

----

Jesus – His importance to believers: P. Draycott.

Copies of miracles, e.g.,



  • Jairus’ Daughter: Mark 5.21-43;

  • The Widow’s son at Nain: Luke 7.11-17

  • Ten Lepers: Luke 17.11-19;

  • A blind man at the pool: John 5.1-15;

  • Lazarus raised from the dead: John 11.1-24.

Other stories listed in Jesus book.

See the BBC Learning Zone for the story of Lazarus, ‘Raising the Roof’ and ‘Looking Rough’.



Key Question: What can we learn from the life and teaching of Jesus?

Supplementary Questions (a) Who is Jesus and what does it mean to follow him today? (d) Why might Christmas be important to ourselves as well as (other) Christians?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 8

Pupils will:



  • consider how the birth of Jesus has a meaning far greater than the historical details of his birth for Christians;

  • know the story of The Other Wise Man;

  • begin to understand the meaning of the word incarnation and its importance for Christians.

Question:

Why is Christmas important to Christians?




8. Explain that although the pupils will probably already be familiar with the Christmas story, in today’s lesson they will be focusing, not so much on the events, but on the key question: How do different Christians commemorate Christmas?

Read The Greatest Gift - The story of the Other Wise Man, explaining that Artaban is a fictional Wise Man who is searching for the truth. What questions would pupils like to ask about the story? Spend a little time exploring a few of these.

1st ACTIVITY: Ask pupils to make a story map, as the story is being read, showing in descriptions, questions and pictures the key events (or make a rough ‘listening aid’).

Ask pupils to compare each other’s questions in pairs and ask them to say what they think the most interesting / difficult questions are.

Introduce the word incarnation and explain that in a Christian context this refers to God being born in a human, ‘carnate’, i.e. bodily, form. ‘Christ’ means ‘Saviour’ and ‘mas’ refers to the commemoration / celebration of his birth – though not all people who refer to themselves as ‘Christians’ celebrate ‘Christmas’ (see notes).

2nd ACTIVITY: Explain that ‘Christ’ is a title given to Jesus, meaning ‘Anointed One’, ‘Messiah’ or ‘Saviour’, and that in the stories about Jesus, it was said that ‘Light has come into the world’ (John 3.19). With this in mind ask pupils to exercise their imagination to think of God coming to live as a human being. Encourage them to make suggestions in pairs or threes for a ‘God’s birthday’ celebration. Get a selection of ideas from the class – how many of them thought of celebrations that involved some form of giving and/or self-sacrifice?



Pupils:
  • describe some of the things that are the same and different about Christmas for people (B3);


  • ask important questions about Christmas and compare their ideas with those of others (E3).

Key vocabulary:

Christ-mas, celebration, commemoration, truth, incarnation, self-sacrifice.

----

The Greatest Gift – The Story of The Other Wise Man (see Resources).

For Christians, Jesus is both fully God and fully human. In other words, he is God incarnate. The fact of the incarnation is intimately bound up with the question of who Jesus is. Jesus is held to be the son of God, who came from God to be the saviour of the world.’ (Taken from Jesus by Pamela Draycott)

Note: Jehovah’s Witnesses do not celebrate ‘Christmas’, largely because of its pagan origins and associations.


Key Question: What can we learn from the life and teaching of Jesus?

Supplementary Questions (a) Who is Jesus and what does it mean to follow him today? (d) Why might Christmas be important to ourselves as well as (other) Christians?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 9

Pupils will:



  • think about the different ways people have to mark the specialness of Christmas;

  • explore ideas about ‘the true meaning of Christmas’;

  • compare their questions and ideas about the meaning of Christmas and different ways of marking it.

Question:

How do different people show that Christmas is important to them?




9. Clear a space in the middle of the classroom and scatter pictures of such Christmas-related activities as Christingle, Nativity play, Carol singers, shopping for gifts, family present unwrapping, advent calendar, Christmas cards with different designs, Santa Claus, providing meals for the homeless at Christmas, Christmas Tree, Christmas in the Orthodox church, etc. Explain that Christians mark the birth of Jesus in different ways. Note that many people do not celebrate Christmas, for a variety of reasons.

1st ACTIVITY: Ask pupils to stand by the picture that best shows ‘The true meaning of Christmas for them.’ Ask for a selection of reasons for their decisions. Encourage them to ask each other questions about their choices and to say (a) what they think many of the pictures have in common and (b) what the main differences might be.

2nd ACTIVITY: Ask pupils to design a poster for outside a church at Christmas that will communicate to people walking past: How we show that Christmas is important to us.

PLENARY: Pin up the pictures used in activity 1. Provide pupils with sticky notes and encourage them to complete the sentence: The true meaning of Christmas is... because... Ask them to place their notes on a chosen picture.

Finish with some feedback from pupils on what they wrote and why they chose a particular picture to put it on.


Pupils:

  • describe some of the things that are the same and different for people about the importance and meaning of Christmas (B3);

  • ask important questions about Christmas and compare their ideas with those of others (E3).

Key vocabulary:

Christ-mas, celebration, commemoration, advent, Christingle,

----

Reasons for not celebrating Christmas include: not believing in Jesus as ‘Christ’; not liking all the commercialism that goes with Christmas; believing that it is not really a ‘Christian’ festival.


Resources: Christmas-related pictures and cards.

Sticky notes.

NB. The RE:quest website has a range of articles, pictures and videos about Christmas.

Crisis helps single homeless people all year, with special events at Christmas.


Key Question: What can we learn from the life and teaching of Jesus?

Supplementary Question (d) Why might Lent and Easter be important to ourselves as well as (other) Christians?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 10

Pupils will:



  • describe some aspects of Lent;

  • consider some Catholic reflections on Holy Week;

  • ask questions about the Easter story.

Question:

Why might Lent and Easter be important?

10. Explain that before Easter Christians have a period of 40 days when they may give up eating rich foods, try to pray more and be kind and be more generous to others. This is to prepare themselves for the feast of Easter – a time when they remember the death of Jesus. This time is called Lent.

1st ACTIVITY (Getting ready): Put a selection of words and pictures on the board (e.g. eat cake, be mean, eat simple food, read the Bible, lie and cheat, give money to charity) and ask the pupils to put them in two lists:

Christians would do in Lent / Christians would not do in Lent.

Ask children what they think it would be like to live like this for 40 days? Why do they think Christians do this?

2nd ACTIVITY: Show the 2 minute account of Holy Week from a Catholic perspective: www.youtube.com/watch?v=HugMM_3FfnI

Then replay the video, pausing at key moments to explain how Catholics remember the story: Palm Sunday, belief in the coming of God’s Kingdom, Washing the disciples’ feet, the Eucharist, Good Friday crucifixion, veneration of the cross, Jesus in the tomb, Easter vigil, Resurrection and Holy Communion.

Set up a tray of ten objects connected to Easter, e.g., a small plastic donkey, a palm cross, a flannel (or bar of soap), a communion cup, a bread role, a crucifix, a plain wooden cross, a hot cross-bun, a chocolate egg, an Easter card.

Encourage the children to work in pairs to think of three big questions they would like to ask about one or two of the objects. Then ask the pairs to get into fours and see if they can agree on the most important question. Ask pupils to write (or have scribed) their best question on large pieces of paper.

PLENARY: Go through the questions and ask the originators to offer a few comments. Ask the rest of the class to say (a) what they think is good about each question and (b) how it might be answered by different people.


Pupils:

  • talk about some things abut Lent and Holy Week that make people ask questions (E2);

  • ask important questions about Lent and Holy Week and compare their ideas with those of others (E3);

  • ask questions about the meaning and purpose of life, and suggest a range of answers, which might be given by them, as well as different Christians (E4).

Key vocabulary:

Lent, Easter, abstinence, self-discipline, will-power, prayer, Catholic, commemoration, Palm Sunday, Messiah, Eucharist, crucifixion, mass, veneration, Christ, tomb, vigil, communion, resurrection, love, service, sacrifice.

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Opening Up Easter edited by Fiona Moss, p. 5.

Note: for some Christians, the egg is a reminder of the stone that was rolled in front of Jesus’ tomb. It is also a symbol of new life.



Key Question: What can we learn from the life and teaching of Jesus?

Supplementary Question (d) Why might Easter be important to ourselves as well as (other) Christians?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 11

Pupils will:


  • think about similarities and differences in the way that different Christians might celebrate Easter.

Questions:

Why do Christians celebrate Easter?

How might different Christians celebrate Easter?

11. Remind children of the objects and questions they asked in the last lesson and replay the short film of (Roman) Catholic perspectives on Easter. Explain that there are different types of Christian church that have, over the 2,000 years since Jesus lived, have developed different ways of remembering the stories of his death and resurrection.

1st ACTIVITY: Show the BBC Learning Zone clip (7022) about Holy Friday in the Greek Orthodox Church and invite children to say some of the things they think are the same for Catholic (and other) Christians (e.g., remembering the death of Jesus, sadness, the tomb, priests, love, Jesus on the cross. Do they think there are some things that are special for this Greek Orthodox church? (e.g. following the Icon).

Next, show the 2nd clip about the Greek Orthodox Church celebration of Easter Day (clip 7025) and ask again for similarities and any differences with what they have seen from the Catholic film (similarities: e.g., eggs, remembering the resurrection of Jesus, the Easter vigil, candle lights; differences: e.g., red-dyed eggs, saying ‘Christos Anesti’ in Greek, cracking eggs at the dinner table).

2nd ACTIVITY: Explain that Christians in different churches have a lot in common but that there are variations in belief and in the ways in which people worship. Divide the children into groups of three and provide each group with a large piece of paper with three big circles drawn on it. Ask them to decide between them on TWO important objects that they think stand for Easter for MOST Christians and ONE thing that might be important for SOME but not all Christians. Encourage each member of the group to draw one item each in the circles on the paper and to label them ‘Similar’ and ‘Different’.

PLENARY: Ask the groups to explain their drawings in turn. Encourage and praise the use of religious language as they compare their objects and explain what they stand for.


Pupils:

  • talk about some of the things about Easter that are the same for different Christians (B2);

  • describe some of the things that are the same and different for Christians when they celebrate Easter (B3);

  • use religious language accurately to describe and compare what practices and experiences may be involved in belonging to different Christian groups (B4).

Key vocabulary:

Easter, prayer, epitaphios, icon, resurrection, vigil, Christos Anesti (Christ is Risen).

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BBC Learning Zone clips.



Key Question: What can we learn from the life and teaching of Jesus?

Supplementary Questions (a) Who is Jesus and what does it mean to follow him today? (d) Why might Easter be important to ourselves as well as (other) Christians?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 12

Pupils will:



  • recap their learning in this unit;

  • reflect on the meanings of a story about ‘death’ and ‘rebirth’;

  • focus on what questions might be raised by the story of Jesus’ death and resurrection;

  • reflect on the different ways people might have of celebrating the events of the first Easter..

Question:

What can we learn from the life and teaching of Jesus?


12. Remind the children that they have been thinking about the question, ‘What can we learn from the life and teaching of Jesus?’ and that they have thought about some of the stories he told, and some that people told about him, some of the miracles people believed he did, and the stories that Christians still remember at Christmas and Easter.

Explain that most Christians believe they have an answer to one of the biggest questions of all: is there life after death? The story of Jesus’ resurrection gives them the ‘sure and certain hope’ that this life is not the end of the story. It is still a mystery as to what life after death might be like. Christians say that will be for God to judge.

1st ACTIVITY: Read the story of Grubby Grubb from Opening Up Easter or Waterbugs and Dragonflies, then either follow Activity 2 from p.13 of Opening Easter or ask pupils in groups to answer ONE of these questions:


  • Why might Christians like this story?

  • What might this story be trying to say about life after death?

  • What do you believe about life after death?

  • What might this story tell us about Easter? Jesus?

Invite the children to come up with their own questions about the story too. Which questions do they think are the most interesting? How do they think the author might answer their questions?

2nd ACTIVITY: Read the story of the death and resurrection of Jesus from the Storyteller Bible or show the last two parts of The Miracle Maker, and ask them for their views on how different people might celebrate Easter according to what they believe about the resurrection of Jesus.

PLENARY: Ask the children to reflect on what they have learnt from the life and teaching of Jesus. Encourage them to write at least one thing they have learnt on a Sticky note. Make a display of the results.


Pupils:

  • ask important questions about life after death and compare their ideas with those of others (E3);

  • describe how different people might celebrate Easter according to their beliefs about the resurrection of Jesus (B3).

Key vocabulary:

resurrection,

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Opening Up Easter edited by Fiona Moss, pp. 12-15.

Waterbugs and Dragonflies by Doris Stickney - available on many websites.

The Miracle Maker DVD final scenes.

The Lion Storyteller Bible, pp. 106-109.




RECORD OF ATTAINMENT

KS2 Unit 2: What can we learn from the life and teaching of Jesus? Christianity (B & E) Year 4 (possibly Y3)

All pupils: (Level 2)

Most pupils - majority class expectation: (Level 3)

Some pupils: (Level 4)

B2 talk about some of the things that are the same for different religious people.

B3 describe some of the things that are the same and different for religious people.

B4 use the religious language accurately to describe and compare what practices and experiences may be involved in belonging to different religious groups.


E2 talk about some things in stories that make people ask questions.

E3 ask important questions about life and compare their ideas with those of other people.

E4 ask questions about the meaning and purpose of life, and suggest a range of answers, which might be given by them, as well as members of different religious groups.













© 2014 North Somerset & Somerset Councils



© 2016 Bath & North East Somerset, Bristol, North Somerset, Haringey & The Isles of Scilly Councils




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