Awareness Mystery Value (amv)

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Awareness Mystery Value (AMV)


Key Stage 2 Unit 1: What Is Important To Me? [A&D]

This unit explores ideas of what it is to be human and relates them to religious and other beliefs

About this example

This series of approximately 10 lessons is intended to provide a set of learning activities in RE for a Year 3/4 class. It was written by Dave Francis (Associate Adviser for RE).

The focus here is on exploring human nature. What are we made of? Do we have a ‘spiritual’ nature? What are the most worthy human characteristics? How might communities of different sorts help us make the most of life? Children explore some of the stories and festivals of Christianity and Judaism in their search to develop and deepen their own understanding of what may be most important in life.


Where the example fits into the curriculum

This example connects with AMV Areas of Enquiry A (Beliefs, teachings and sources) and D (Questions of identity, diversity and belonging). It makes cross-curricular connections with Literacy and History.

The lessons could be used in discrete RE time or as part of a ‘creative curriculum’ approach where RE links with other curriculum subjects around a theme or key question, such as ‘Ourselves’ / ‘Healthy Lifestyles’ / ‘Healthy, Wealthy and Wise’.

Prior Learning

For some children this will be the first RE enquiry in Year 3. Pupils in Year 4 will have engaged in enquiry units on what is means to belong to Judaism and to Christianity. They will have leant about some of Jesus’ parables and miracles and how people express their (religious) identity in a variety of ways. They will know the story of Moses, the escape from Egypt and the journey to the Promised Land.


Featured Religions / Beliefs

Areas of Enquiry

Christianity

AT 1: Learning ABOUT religion and belief

AT 2: Learning FROM religion and belief

Judaism

A. Beliefs, teachings and sources



D. Identity and belonging






B. Practices and ways of life




E. Meaning, purpose and truth







C. Forms of expression




F. Values and commitments







Key Question: What Is Important To Me?

Supplementary Questions

  1. Who am I and what does it mean to be human? (Physical and non-physical aspects of human identity)?
  2. Where do I belong? (My school, home, family, tradition, cultures, organisations including those involving religion and belief, local community, the UK, the global community)?


  3. What am I worth? (Beliefs about the value of human beings)?

  4. How might stories, hymns, prayers etc help people understand more about themselves and their relationships?




Resources

The following texts and e-resources have been used for the sample learning activities below. Teachers are, of course, free to vary the resources suggested here to suit their pupils.



  • ‘Christianity Unpacked’ PowerPoint on ‘Belonging to a Church’: http://request.org.uk/teachers/christianity-unpacked/being-christian/2014/09/18/church/ (RE Quest)

  • Mackley, J. (ed.) 2008, Exploring Sacred Stories, RE Today Services.

  • Moss, F. (ed.) 2011, Opening Up Judaism, RE Today Services.

  • Hartman, B. and KK Nagy, 2008, The Lion Storyteller Bible, Lion Hudson.

  • Moss, F. (ed.) 2012, Opening Up Christianity, RE Today Services.

  • Butterworth, N. and M. Inkpen, 2009, The Ten Silver Coins, Candle Books.

  • You Tube, play I Gotta Love You Rosh HaShanah found at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vOTOdBzSpYc&feature=player_embedded

  • Rosh HaShanah cards, e.g., at www.greetingcarduniverse.com

  • Rosh HaShanah food information, e.g., at http://judaism.about.com/od/holidays/a/Rosh-Hashanah-Food-Customs.htm

  • Jewish artefacts, especially Challah loaf, Rosh HaShanah cards.

  • Mackley, J. (ed.) 2005, Special People of Faith and Action, RE Today Services.





Learning Outside the Classroom

No specific out of school activities are included in this unit, though there are opportunities for visitors, such as a local minister or other representatives of the Christian or Jewish faiths, to bring their experience of the outside world into the classroom.



Expectations: ‘A&D’ are the focus areas of enquiry identified on the previous page

By the end of this sequence of learning:

All pupils (Level 1):

Most pupils (majority class expectation – Level 2):

Some pupils (Level 3):

Some pupils (Level 4):

A1 remember a Christian or Jewish story and talk about it.

D1 talk about things that happen to them.




A2 tell a Christian or Jewish story and say some things that people believe.

D2 ask about what happens to others with respect for their feelings.



A3 describe what a believer might learn from a religious story.

D3 compare some of the things that influence them, with those that influence other people.


A4 make links between the beliefs (teachings, sources, etc.) of different religious groups and show how they are connected to believers’ lives.

D4 ask questions about who we are and where we belong, and suggest answers which refer to people who have inspired and influenced myself and others.


These statements are taken from the old ‘Can-do’ levels. The new ‘Learning Outcomes’ can be found in the ‘Standards’ section of the new AMV website: http://awarenessmysteryvalue.org




Key Question: What Is Important To Me?

Supplementary Question (a): Who am I and what does it mean to be human? (Physical and non-physical aspects of human identity)?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 1

Pupils will:



  • reflect on the physical and non-physical aspects of their identity;

  • learn about one of the creation stories in the book of Genesis;

  • consider the idea of a soul or spiritual part of human nature.

1. Tell children about the key question for the next series of RE lessons: What Is Important To Me? and explain that they are going to investigate this question in many ways and they are going to get clues on how to answer it by looking at different people’s beliefs about what is important in life.

Ask children what they say if you ask them, ‘Who are you?’ Do they give their name? Ask, ‘What more is there to you, than your name?’ Encourage them to tell the person next to them more about themselves, e.g., their age, their birthday, whether they see themselves as big or small, loud or quiet, friendly, sporty etc.

Explore with children facial expressions, body language and tone of voice such as shouting and whispering.

Explain that we can we seen as being made up of physical and non-physical aspects. Physical things are our shape, our gender, our outward appearance, our biological parts, our chemical constituents. Ask children, ‘If all these things are just thrown together what might they make?’

Human beings are put together in a very special way and we have feelings, thoughts and imagination. These could be called non-physical because they arise from brain activity. Many people believe we also have a spirit (or soul) that is the essential person inside.

Tell children that according to the Bible, after God had created Adam and Eve, they disobeyed the one rule God had made for them and had to leave the beautiful garden God had made for them. Read the story from Genesis 3. If time, ask children to think of some questions they would like to ask about this story and let them know that they are going to investigate this story next time.


Pupils:

  • talk about things that happen to them;

  • ask about what happens to others with respect for their feelings.

Key vocabulary:

physical, non-physical, soul, spirit, creation, Bible.

-----

Do children know that most of our body is made up of water? And almost 99% of the mass of the human body is made up of the six elements: oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, calcium, and phosphorus. Do they know that the average human body contains enough sulphur to kill all fleas on an average dog?!



A version of the Genesis 3 story is found in Opening Up Judaism, Activity 3, p.23, and in the Lion Storyteller Bible, pp.10f. Explain that this is a story that is special for Jews and Christians. Muslims also have a version of it: see The Qur’an s.20.116ff.

Key Question: What Is Important To Me?

Supplementary Question (a): Who am I and what does it mean to be human? (Physical and non-physical aspects of human identity)?

(d) How might stories, hymns, prayers etc help people understand more about themselves and their relationships?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 2

Pupils will:


  • remember the story of Adam and Eve’s failure to resist temptation


  • reflect on the difficulty of keeping all the rules;

  • begin to consider some of the factors that can influence behaviour;

  • reflect on some of the responsibilities that human beings have;

  • consider what might be learnt by Jews from the story of Adam and Eve.

2. Remind children of the key question: What Is Important To Me? and ask them to recall the story of the ‘Fall’ of Adam and Eve. Tell them that this story is in the Jewish and Christian bibles.

Issue a version of the story in packs of 12 cards to pairs or small groups of children and ask them to (a) put the story in the right order and (b) match each part of the story with a picture or symbol.

Ask children not to look out of the window and pretend there is something funny going on out there. Look out yourself and say, ‘That is really funny...’ Remind children not look out of the window. How many give in to temptation and take a look? Remind them that Adam and Eve broke the only rule they were given, but what does it say about human beings and the difficulty of keeping rules?

Ask children to discuss and write answers to some questions about the story of Adam and Eve, e.g., What did Eve do in the story that was wrong? What did Adam do that was wrong? How was the serpent involved? When have you successfully resisted the temptation to do wrong? Have you ever influenced others to do something wrong? Have you ever been influenced by someone else? What do you think the writer of the story believes about (a) human beings and (b) God? What do you think a member of the Jewish faith might learn from this story about looking after the world? What did you learn?




Pupils:

  • remember a Judaeo-Christian story and talk about it;

  • talk about things that happen to them;
  • say some things that people believe;


  • describe what a believer might learn from a religious story;

  • compare some of the things that influence them, with those that influence other people.

Key vocabulary:

temptation, sin, Bible, Jewish, Christian.

-----

Make the story of the ‘Fall’ into 12 parts to go on separate cards, such as those found in Opening Up Judaism, Activity 3, p 23. Prepare some clipart or other images and symbols that might be matched with each part of the story.



A longer list of questions about Adam and Eve in also contained in Opening Up Judaism.


Key Question: What Is Important To Me?

Supplementary Questions (a): Who am I and what does it mean to be human? (Physical and non-physical aspects of human identity)?

(d) How might stories, hymns, prayers etc help people understand more about themselves and their relationships?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 3

Pupils will:



  • reflect on the purpose of the Adam and Eve story;

  • consider how selfish behaviour can lead to suffering for others and for the selfish person themselves;

  • reflect on the good things about human nature.

3. Remind children of the story of the ‘Fall’ of Adam and Eve.

Point out that serpents / snakes do not really talk so either this describes something that only happened at the beginning of the human story, or there is some other explanation. Perhaps it is a poetic tale that is meant to teach us something about life.

Provide small groups with a pack each of nine cards: each card gives a different idea about the story, e.g., ‘The Garden of Eden was a real place’, ‘The story makes religious people think that they should take care of the world’, and ‘Muslims, Christians and Jews love this story, so it’s worth finding out why they like it so much.’ See Opening Up Judaism, Activity 6, for more ideas.

Ask children in their small groups to use a diamond pattern to show which ideas they think are best (at the top) and which they do not find so important (at the bottom). Compare ideas across the class: which ideas do most of the children find best? Which are not so good? Why?

Explain that people can behave selfishly and do things that lead to suffering for themselves and others (this is sometimes called ‘sin’), but Christians and Jews say that people were made ‘in the image and likeness of God’ so they must have many good qualities as well. Can children think of examples of good, wise, loving, brave behaviour?

Ask children to talk to a partner about human nature: are we a mixture of selfish and caring feelings? Is there good and bad in all? How much choice do we have about the way we treat others?

Ask them to list (and write up) some reasons people give for behaving well or badly and share these with the class.



Pupils:

  • remember a Judaeo-Christian story and talk about it;

  • talk about things that happen to them;

  • say some things that people believe;

  • describe what a believer might learn from a religious story;

  • compare some of the things that influence them, with those that influence other people.

Key vocabulary:

temptation, sin, disobedience, the Fall, repentance, ‘image and likeness of God’.

-----

Make some packs of 9 cards, such as those found in Opening Up Judaism, Activity 6, p.24, for Diamond Nine activity.



Amongst ‘good human qualities’, you could also mention that the four cardinal virtues of Ancient Greece were justice, courage, wisdom and moderation. These were built into the education system.

Key Question: What Is Important To Me?

Supplementary Question (b) Where do I belong? (My school, home, family, tradition, cultures, organisations including those involving religion and belief, local community, the UK, the global community)

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 4

Pupils will:



4. Remind children of the key question: What Is Important To Me? and explain that today they will be thinking about the groups and communities they may belong to. Explain that a community is a group of people who get together for common purposes, e.g., a school community meets for learning. Some children might also know of virtual communities that can stretch across the world.

Provide a visual stimulus showing different communities, e.g., family, school, football club, choir, Brownies, Cubs, village community, sporting club and so on. What national and international identities / connections might they have?

Ask children to draw a ‘spider’ diagram with themselves at the centre, showing all of the different communities they belong to.

Explain that some people belong to religious communities such as Christians, Jews, Muslims and Hindus.

Ask children to make a class ‘thought-map’ of the Christian Community, contributing ideas of what they know about what Christians do together, e.g., pray, worship, help people in need, sing hymns and songs, read the Bible, give money for charities, meet Christians from other parts of the world, talk to people from other religions to make friends, etc. They should then add questions of what they would like to find out about, e.g., why do Christians sing songs? Why do they pray? Do they all have to go to church?

Ask how they think they might find the answers to such questions.

If time, show the RE:Quest presentation on ‘Belonging to a Church’ (see Resources) and ask children to try to remember some of the activities involved in belonging to a church.


Pupils:

  • remember some things about Christians and talk about them;

  • talk about things that happen to them.

Key vocabulary:

group, community, belonging, Christian action: prayer, worship, charity.

-----

RE:Quest website (in the teachers section) or ‘Christianity Unpacked’ CD-ROM.



Key Question: What Is Important To Me?

Supplementary Questions:

(b) Where do I belong? (My school, home, family, tradition, cultures, organisations including those involving religion and belief, local community, the UK, the global community)

(d) How might stories, hymns, prayers etc help people understand more about themselves and their relationships?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 5

Pupils will:



  • learn more about the Christian community and the reasons people may have for belonging to it.

5. Show the RE:Quest presentation on ‘Belonging to a Church’ and focus children’s attention on the final slide where Jesus says, "Your love for one another will prove to the world that you are my disciples" (John 13.35).

Explain that, for Christians, belonging to their local church involves more than just going to church services. It is a commitment with both responsibilities and benefits.

Divide the class into small groups, and give a set of ‘thinkthrough_belonging’ pictures to each group (or use the picture and activities in the middle of Opening Up Christianity).

Ask children to talk with each other about what is being shown in each picture to see if they can recall the details of the presentation.

Explain that these are pictures of the different kinds of things that happen at church. Ask the groups to divide the pictures into different kinds of activities, and give reasons for their choices (e.g. activities for church members or others, activities that help teach or worship…) or, if using Opening Up Christianity match the Bible quotes with the picture where the teaching is being followed.

Ask children to look at the pictures and work out why they think Christians would want to belong to their local church? How do Christians think they should behave towards other people? Let each group discuss, write down their reasons, and then share them with the class.



Pupils:

  • remember some Christian activities in the church and talk about them;

  • recall Christian activities and say some things that people believe;

  • ask about what happens to others with respect for their feelings;

  • describe what a believer might learn from the pictures.

Key vocabulary:

Church, love, worship, commitment, benefits and responsibilities.

-----

Print copies of the RE:Quest file ‘thinkthrough_belonging’, and cut each into its individual pictures.



See Opening Up Christianity, pp.15f.

This lesson might be led by a local Christian minister who could add personal reflections on the idea of belonging to the Christian church and which beliefs particularly inspire him / her to put their belonging into practice.






Key Question: What Is Important To Me?

Supplementary Question

(b) Where do I belong? (My school, home, family, tradition, cultures, organisations including those involving religion and belief, local community, the UK, the global community)

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 6

Pupils will:


  • reflect on the beliefs that different communities may have;


  • express their ideas about Christian communities;

  • reflect on their own values;

  • compare their ideas with those expressed in Christian communities.

6. Remind children of the key question: What Is Important To Me? and ask them to think again about the communities of which they are a part (see Lesson 4). Ask children to say whether these groups have any particular beliefs, e.g., the school believes in helping all children to do their best; the football club believes in winning fair and square; the choir believes in singing the most enjoyable songs and so on.

Remind them of the spider diagram they made a couple of lessons ago. Ask children to add to each community they belong to a list of the things they share with them (both beliefs and activities).

When the spider diagram is finished, remind children of what they learned about belonging to Christianity and ask them to complete some sentences:


  1. Christians meet together as a community because...

  2. In everyday life Christians might show their worship to God by...

  3. If I met some Christians who were a few years older than me, I might ask...

  4. Christians might answer my question by saying… [give TWO different possible answers]

Pupils:

  • remember some Christian activities in the church - talk about them and say some things that people believe;

  • talk about things that happen to them;

  • ask about what happens to others with respect for their feelings;

  • compare some of the things that influence them, with those that influence other people.

Key vocabulary:

communities, Christians, belief.

-----

Sentences could be provided on cards for children to complete.





Key Question: What Is Important To Me?

Supplementary Questions (c) What am I worth? (Beliefs about the value of human beings)

(d) How might stories, hymns, prayers etc help people understand more about themselves and their relationships?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 7

Pupils will:



  • learn about the worth of human beings – in more ways than one;

  • hear a story Jesus told to help people understand the value of human beings;

  • reflect on the meaning of Jesus’ teaching.

7. Explain that as part of their investigation they will be looking at the worth of a human being. Our chemical constituents can be bought for about £4! But how can we really judge the worth of a person? Should we? Ask children if they think all people are of equal worth and for their reasons.

Show them some pictures of different sort of people, including one or two fictional characters, and ask them who they think is: the most beautiful person; the most intelligent; the strongest, the most trustworthy, the healthiest, the most talented. After some discussion explain that all these words, strong, beautiful, intelligent etc, are often used to judge outward appearance – but how can we know what is inside a person? What about fictional characters – what is their value? We all make judgements about people, but isn’t every single real person of equal value?

Using ideas in Opening Up Christianity, Activity 3, open a box with a jigsaw and explain that you wanted to tell a story using it, but some pieces are missing. Children search (and find) the missing pieces you have hidden around the room. There could be several colour-coded copies of the puzzle. Ask children to make their jigsaws while you tell the story of the Lost Coin (Luke 15.8-10), or use The Ten Silver Coins.

After the story, explain that this was a story that Jesus told when he was criticised for mixing with people that were thought by some to be of lower value in society.

Ask children questions about the meaning of the story. What do the coins stand for? Who does the woman stand for? Is she like an angel? Is Jesus saying something about the value of people?

Can they add any more to the spider diagram of communities?


Pupils:

  • recall a Christian story and say some things that people believe;

  • ask about what happens to others with respect for their feelings;

  • describe what a believer might learn from the story of the Lost Coin;

  • compare some of the things that influence them, with those that influence other people.

Key vocabulary:

worth, society, judgements, character, value, angel.

-----

Provide some pictures of different sort of people for small groups to work with, e.g., Mother Teresa, Eleanor Simmonds (Paralympic swimmer), Prof. Stephen Hawking, a baby, Adele (singer), Carlos Tevez (footballer), Father Christmas, Michelle Obama.



Make some simple jigsaw puzzles of a picture of a woman counting golden coins in her home, such as the one in Opening Up Christianity, p.5. Use different coloured card for each puzzle.

Butterworth & Inkpen, The Ten Silver Coins.



Key Question: What Is Important To Me?

Supplementary Questions (c) What am I worth? (Beliefs about the value of human beings)

(d) How might stories, hymns, prayers etc help people understand more about themselves and their relationships?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lessons 8 & 9

Pupils will:


  • learn about two important Jewish festivals;


  • reflect on the meaning of those festivals for Jewish identity and belonging;

  • learn about some of the difficulties about sticking to your religion and beliefs;

  • learn about aspects of celebration in Jewish communities;

  • consider how stories can influence people’s behaviour;

  • reflect on new year’s resolutions.

8 & 9. Remind children of the key question: What Is Important To Me? and that they are building up some good clues as to how to answer the question in detail.

To know what is important to us, it’s a good idea to compare with what other people find important. Explain that family and friends are very important to most people, but how do we keep our relationships in a good state of repair?

Explain that Jews believe that although people are ‘sinful’ God can forgive sins provided people say sorry (repent). So, every year on a special day called Yom Kippur (the Day of Atonement), Jews say sorry for anything they have done wrong and remember that God will balance their good deeds against their bad. It is a time to start the new year with good deeds. Ask children what their favourite or most special time of the year is.

Play the clip about Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur at http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/topics/znwhfg8/resources/1 and ask children to recall some key ideas about the festivals, e.g., a time of reflecting, Rosh HaShanah is the first day of creation, confession and forgiveness of sins, telling the story of Jonah and the Big Fish, and the singing of the Kol Nidrei, releasing Jews from vows made at a time when they were threatened with death if they did not become Christians.

Use ideas in Opening Up Judaism to explore with children what these festivals mean to Jews, e.g., Isabel (p.15) and ask why they think people have festivals. Why are Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur important to Isabel? Do such festivals help families in some special ways?

Follow the ideas in Opening Up Judaism and split the class into groups to research the four foods often used at Rosh HaShanah: Challah bread, pomegranates, honey cakes, and apples.

If you can use You Tube, play I Gotta Love You Rosh HaShanah found here >> and show them some Rosh HaShanah cards, found e.g., at http://www.chabad.org/tools/cards/default_cdo/aid/780237/jewish/Greeting-Cards.htm or www.greetingcarduniverse.com > search ‘Hashanah’.

Ask the groups to make Rosh HaShanah cards featuring these foods. Inside, alongside a suitable greeting, they should complete a sentence beginning, ‘Rosh Hashanah is important because...’

As children are completing their cards, tell the story of Jonah and the Big Fish, a story often told at Rosh HaShanah, e.g., from Opening Up Judaism, p.17, and ask children what they think Christians and Jews might learn from this story about (a) human beings and (b) God. What are their favourite stories? Do they think that stories can influence the way we behave towards others?

Explain that many stories are told in order to encourage people to lead a better life. Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur are times when Jewish people recommit themselves to being kinder to others in the new year ahead. Ask children what good deeds they think they might do today / in the coming week.


Pupils:

  • remember a Jewish story and talk about it;

  • talk about things that happen to them;

  • tell a Jewish story and say some things that people believe;

  • ask about what happens to others with respect for their feelings;

  • describe what a believer might learn from a religious story;

  • compare some of the things that influence them, with those that influence other people.

Key vocabulary:

sin, repentance, atonement, Rosh Hashanah, shofar, Yom Kippur, forgiveness, confession, Kol Nidrei – lit. ‘All Vows’.

-----

Short film on Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur BBC Learning Zone on the BBC Learning Zone > Clip 3663.



See Opening Up Judaism, pp.14ff.

Help children research Jewish foods by providing information, e.g., from http://tinyurl.com/6bw552l

Show children Challah loaves, Rosh HaShanah cards etc from the Judaism artefacts box.

Challah loaves can be made for the class to taste: there are lots of recipes on the internet!







Key Question: What Is Important To Me?

Supplementary Questions (a): Who am I and what does it mean to be human? (Physical and non-physical aspects of human identity)?

(b) Where do I belong? (My school, home, family, tradition, cultures, organisations including those involving religion and belief, local community, the UK, the global community)

(c) What am I worth? (Beliefs about the value of human beings)

(d) How might stories, hymns, prayers etc help people understand more about themselves and their relationships?


Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 10

Pupils will:



  • learn more about human needs and happiness;

  • learn something about the terrible consequences of blaming others for everything;

  • reflect on what people need to help them through hard times;

  • make connections between some of the stories and activities in this enquiry;

  • reach their own conclusions on the key question, ‘What Is Important To Me?’



10. Remind children of the key question: What Is Important To Me? and ask what we need to stay alive. As well as food and water and shelter do we need other things to be happy? What might those things be?

Explain that the stories and festivals we have looked at can become even more important in times of trouble. If you want to challenge your class to some higher level work, try the following:

Tell the story of Rabbi Hugo Gryn, e.g., from Special People of Faith and Action, p.10. Around 80 years ago, when Hitler took power in Germany, Jewish people (amongst many others) were being unfairly blamed for all the country’s problems. They were put in slave labour camps and many died there. Hugo and his father were in one such camp. They had very little food but used some margarine to try to light a wick made of threads of cotton to mark a Jewish festival (Hanukkah). It didn’t really work and Hugo, who was just a boy was angry at the waste of food when they were so hungry. His father taught him a lesson he never forgot. He said that they could live for over a week without food and some days without water, but they could not live for three minutes without hope.

Ask children what they think Hugo’s father meant. Can they make a link between this story and the one about Jonah and the Big Fish? What about connections with stories that Jesus told, e.g., about the Lost Coin?

Go on to ask further questions, such as, What was the example that Hugo’s father set? Who or what sets an example for you? What questions would you like to ask Hugo? What answers do you think he would give?

Finally, ask children to work in pairs to make up a ‘lesson for life’, entitled, ‘What is important to me’, including a statement that begins, ‘This is important because....’



Pupils:

  • describe what a believer might learn from a religious story;

  • compare some of the things that influence them, with those that influence other people;

  • make links between the beliefs (teachings, sources, etc.) of different religious groups and show how they are connected to believers’ lives.

  • ask questions about who we are and where we belong, and suggest answers which refer to people who have inspired and influenced myself and others.

Key vocabulary:

hope, Hanukkah, setting an example.

-----

Mackley, J. (ed.) Special People of Faith and Action.







RECORD OF ATTAINMENT

KS2 Unit 1: What Is Important To Me? (A & D) Year 3/4

All pupils (Level 1):

Most pupils (Level 2):

Some pupils (Level 3):

Some pupils (Level 4):

A1 remember a Christian or Jewish story and talk about it.

D1 talk about things that happen to them.




A2 tell a Christian or Jewish story and say some things that people believe.

D2 ask about what happens to others with respect for their feelings.

A3 describe what a believer might learn from a religious story.

D3 compare some of the things that influence them, with those that influence other people.



A4 make links between the beliefs (teachings, sources, etc.) of different religious groups and show how they are connected to believers’ lives.

D4 ask questions about who we are and where we belong, and suggest answers which refer to people who have inspired and influenced myself and others.
















2012 Dave Francis




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