Awareness Mystery Value (amv)

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Awareness Mystery Value (AMV)


Key Stage 3 Unit 9: What’s to be done? What really matters in religion and belief? [B&F]

This unit explores how people’s values and commitments might be demonstrated in the lives of individuals and communities

About this example

This example is based around the events of the 11th September 2011 and the controversial issues surrounding the portrayal of those and subsequent events in the media. It is intended for a Year 8 or 9 class. It was written by Dave Francis and based on his contributions to the 9/11 project website, where supporting resources for this unit can be found. http://since911.com/education-program/lesson-plans/re

The focus here is on the portrayal of religion and followers of particular religions and on the variety of responses made by people to acts of terrorism. The original unit has been specifically adapted for AMV.

The programme of learning aims to engage students through activities that may, e.g:



  • involve a real-life choice or inspire action;

  • affirm identities and sense of belonging, relate to social interests, involve working with others and leave nobody out;

  • offer an authentic experience or encounter, which challenges their own views and extends their understanding of others;

  • introduce something new that they feel impelled to share with others; or help them to see the significance of something already familiar.

Where the example fits into the AMV programme of study

This example connects with Areas of Enquiry B (Practices & Ways of Life) and F (Values & Commitments).

In terms of ‘experiences and opportunities’, the example connects with: ‘discussing, questioning and evaluating important issues in religion and philosophy, including ultimate questions and ethical issues’, ‘reflecting on and carefully evaluating their own beliefs and values and those of others in response to their learning in religious education, using reasoned, balanced arguments’ and ‘exploring the connections between religious education and other subject areas, such as Art & Design, ICT and Citizenship.


Prior Learning

Students may have engaged with ideas, images and artefacts from different cultures in Art & Design, have had practice in weighing up what is fair and unfair in different situations and learnt about the different meanings of Jihad in Religious Education.





Featured Religions / Beliefs

Focus ‘Key Concepts’

Christianity

AT 1: Learning ABOUT religion

AT 2: Learning FROM religion

Islam

A. Beliefs, teachings and sources



D. Identity, diversity and belonging








B. Practices and ways of life



E. Meaning, purpose and truth







C. Forms of expressing meaning




F. Values and commitments



Key Question: What’s to be done? What really matters in religion and belief?

Supplementary Questions

  1. What rights and responsibilities do I have?

  2. Why does there seem to be so much poverty and injustice in the world?

  3. How do religions and beliefs encourage their members to be a force for good in the world? (Religious practices such as prayer, meditation, charitable giving, giving time to those in need, spoken and written advice and guidance, etc)?

  4. How do religions and beliefs engage in dialogue with one another?

Resources

The original scheme with accompanying resources can be found at http://since911.com/education-program/lesson-plans/re

Other resources are listed in the text below. https://www.wtc.com/memorial



Expectations. By the end of this sequence of learning:


[Developing] Students:

[Secure] Students:

[Exceeding] Students:

  • ask important questions about social issues involving conflict and injustice and suggest what might happen depending on different moral choices;

  • make links between Jesus’ teaching and how Christians might respond to these moral choices;

  • make links between the teachings of another belief apart from Christianity, their texts and symbols and responses to contexts of conflict or injustice;

  • make good reasons for the views they have and the connections they make.

  • give different views on the problem of conflict and injustice in the modern world in relation to religion, belief and the media;

  • use reasoning and examples to express insights into the relationship between beliefs, teachings and ethical issues;

  • explain the challenges of the Christian principles of love, forgiveness and trust in God with reference to key texts;

  • explain why the followers of another belief system other than Christianity, are inspired to follow a particular religious or philosophical path;

  • use reasoning and examples to express their own views on how Christianity and the other tradition being studies have affected the world.

  • evaluate questions about conflict and injustice in the modern world and its relation to religion and belief;
  • use reasoning and examples to show an ability to evaluate different insights into the relationship between beliefs, teachings and ethical issues;


  • analyse the effectiveness of the Christian principles of love, forgiveness and trust in God with reference to key texts;

  • explain how followers of another faith other than Christianity may differ in the inspiration and interpretation they place on key texts and how that may impact on their spiritual path;

  • use reasoning and several examples from differing viewpoints to express their own views on how Christianity and the other tradition being studied have affected the world.

Introduction and links to cross-curricular curricular learning strategies

This enquiry focuses on some of the key lessons that can be learnt from 9/11. Examples may be used from more recent terrorist atrocities. Through exploring the concepts of ‘conflict’, ‘forgiveness’, ‘justice’ and ‘conflict resolution’, the students deepen their knowledge and understanding of the different ways in which people are encouraged to be a force for good in the world.

The students look at the causes of different conflicts and examples of violent extremism before examining in more detail some of the events surrounding 9/11. They explore the part that particular interpretations of religion and beliefs played in the attacks on the USA before using the responses to 9/11 of survivors, the bereaved and religious leaders to consider the roles played by religion and belief in conflict resolution.

In the final stage of the enquiry, the students work in small teams to produce introductory material for the school website or front of school display to commemorate an anniversary of 9/11. The aim is to introduce students in other year groups to the key factors that account for the impact of religion and belief on the events of 9/11 and beyond.

Key Question: What’s to be done? What really matters in religion and belief?


Supplementary Questions:

(a) What rights and responsibilities do I have?

(b) Why does there seem to be so much poverty and injustice in the world?


Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Stage 1

Students will:



  • explore the key concepts of forgiveness, conflict, justice, and conflict resolution



Explain that this unit will help students weigh up how religion and belief are portrayed in the media, through an investigation of how the events of 9/11 were reported.

Their task will be to produce introductory materials (written and/or filmed) for the school website to commemorate an anniversary of 9/11. The aim of these materials will be to help younger students understand some of the issues emanating from this unique event.

Ask students what they know about 9/11 – show them some iconic images from 9/11 to jog their memories. Ask them what other events involving violent extremism can they think of?

Show them a short news film clip of a conflict from around the world which includes images of the conflict and statements from those involved.

Ask the students to identify the likely reasons for the conflict along with the different views and motives of those involved. Through discussion explore this further and get them to consider what big questions about life are raised by such conflicts. Take the opportunity to introduce the notions of conflict, forgiveness, justice and conflict resolution.

Set up a ‘concept comment-building’ activity using the guidance provided. Use this to help the students build up their initial ideas around the concepts of ‘CONFLICT’, ‘FORGIVENESS’, ‘JUSTICE’ and ‘CONFLICT RESOLUTION’.

Encourage the students to draw on the discussions about 9/11 and other conflicts from earlier in the lesson. At the end, ask a member of each group to feed back the comments on their sheets to the whole class and compare the different views expressed. Keep the resulting comment sheets for use later in the enquiry.


Students:

  • think about the events around 9/11;

  • realise they are dealing with matters of life and death that could affect them personally at some point in their lives;

  • start to gain an understanding of the complexities surrounding different conflicts in exploring the four key concepts;

  • listen to the views of their peers and, in light of this and other evidence, begin to form and express their own views.

Key vocabulary:

‘9/11’, conflict, forgiveness, justice, conflict resolution.

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Two or three iconic images from the 9/11 website.



http://www.voanews.com/a/proposal-to-build-ground-zero-muslim-center-revisited/1913143.html

Understanding concepts from the since 9/11 website







Key Question: What’s to be done? What really matters in religion and belief?

Supplementary Questions:

(a) What rights and responsibilities do I have?

(b) Why does there seem to be so much poverty and injustice in the world?

(c) How do religions and beliefs encourage their members to be a force for good in the world? (Religious practices such as prayer, meditation, charitable giving, giving time to those in need, spoken and written advice and guidance, etc)?



Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning


Outcomes

References and notes

Stage 2

Students will:



  • use drama to explore how beliefs and values feature in some local conflicts.

Explain that this enquiry into What really matters in religion and belief is going to be carried out in relation to the events of 11 September 2001 and beyond. Explain that students are going to utilise some of the concepts explored in the previous lesson.

Organise the class into small groups and provide them with a case study of a recent dispute that took place within a local community in the UK can use some materials from the 2016 Totterdown Mosque incident (see distinctively local unit C06).

Ask the students to read through the materials and then, in their groups, to consider what part people’s beliefs and values played in the dispute and what part beliefs and values could play in resolving it. Get each group in turn to feed back their views to the rest of the class.

If there is time you could ask the students to repeat the same exercise but this time using a local small scale conflict or dispute that they have heard about to explore the part that people’s beliefs and values may have played in the course of the conflict.

Back in small groups, ask the students to select one of the examples, either from the case study or their own, and script a two minute drama reconstruction of the story. Get them to choose five key moments in the story and freeze the action at those points. Ask each group to record those moments and devise captions to go with these. They could either use digital cameras to do this or produce their own drawings. The captions should raise questions of belief and value, as indicated in the case study. Leave sufficient time for the groups to provide brief feedback on their dramas to the rest of the class and collect in their work as they will need to use it later in the enquiry.

Conclude this stage of the enquiry by using an interactive timeline to introduce the students to a brief outline of the events surrounding 9/11 and begin to reveal some of the links to religion and belief

Explain that in the next few lessons they will investigate the extent to which religion and belief had a vital impact at each stage of the series of events.


Students:

  • examine some of the forces that lead to conflict and confrontation

  • identify potential causes of small scale conflict, how things can escalate and what may be needed for resolution to take place;

  • work creatively together to identify points of contention in some matters of religion and belief;

  • get a sense of how beliefs and practices are a vital part of many people’s identity.

Key vocabulary:

pentangle, rakhi, hijab, jilbab, justice, mercy, love, forgiveness, duty.

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1. Case study of a dispute within a British community, involving religion / belief - see resources at the end of this enquiry template



2. Timeline of 9/11 events: from the recruitment / conversion of the terrorists to extremist Islamism, to reactions to the attacks





Key Question: What’s to be done? What really matters in religion and belief?

Supplementary Questions:

(c) How do religions and beliefs encourage their members to be a force for good in the world? (Religious practices such as prayer, meditation, charitable giving, giving time to those in need, spoken and written advice and guidance, etc)?



Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Stage 3

Students will:



  • Investigate what religion might have to do with violent extremism.

Show the students a digital image sequence of photographs from different conflicts/protests across the world

Ask them to identify where and how religion and belief has been involved in the different examples of conflicts. Point out the potential of strongly held religious and political commitments to contribute to conflict AND to be part of conflict resolution.

Explain that it is important not to confuse such terms as ‘fundamentalist’, ‘radical’, ‘extremist’ and ‘terrorist’. It is sometimes said that ‘one person’s terrorist is another person’s freedom fighter’ for teacher’s notes on these terms). Show students these definitions on screen, briefly explicate and show how they can access them for future use.

Provide the students with a set of cards containing possible causes of participation in violent extremism along with copies of the photographs.

Ask them to discuss in small groups whether a combination of these factors is needed to produce a violent extremist, or whether one or two factors alone might be enough. What could be done to prevent such factors taking hold? Suggest that families, communities, governments and education may have a role.

Re-introduce the interactive timeline of 9/11 along with a list of eight values in religion/belief. Keeping this list displayed, ask the students to vote for the value or values they think were uppermost at each key event in the story of 9/11. Allow time for the students to give reasons for their choices. Keep a record of the students’ votes for use later in the enquiry.



Students:
  • consider the complexities of human behaviour and motivation. The intention is not that they should come up with simplistic solutions but to come to the realisation that there is a mix of factors involved in bringing an individual to a point where they are involved in violent extremist behaviours;


  • consider both (a) what might be the most potent mix of factors that could lead someone to violent extremism, and (b) what might be done by individuals, society and religious communities to prevent such an outcome and its consequences.

Key vocabulary:

fundamentalist, radical, extremist, terrorist.

All these resources can be found at http://since911.com/education-program/lesson-plans/re

1. Photo sequence of conflicts and protests across the world

2. Flash cards: causes of violent extremism

3. Timeline of 9/11events: from the recruitment / conversion of the terrorists to extremist Islamism, to reactions to the attacks

4. List of Values in religion/belief: justice, mercy, love, forgiveness, duty, courage, self-sacrifice, humility





Key Question: What’s to be done? What really matters in religion and belief?

Supplementary Questions:

(a) What rights and responsibilities do I have?

(c) How do religions and beliefs encourage their members to be a force for good in the world? (Religious practices such as prayer, meditation, charitable giving, giving time to those in need, spoken and written advice and guidance, etc)?

(d) How do religions and beliefs engage in dialogue with one another?



Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Stage 4

Students will:



  • reflect on how people have responded to the events of 9/11 and the part played by beliefs and values in this.

Start the lesson by showing the class the film clip ‘60 second sermon - Forgive Your Enemies (see resources). Invite the students in small groups to discuss the question at the end of clip, ‘Could you do the same (i.e. forgive someone who had hurt you badly)? At this point you could also ask them to consider the responses of people affected by other terrorist acts of violence, for example the London bombings of 7/7. There are a number of useful resources for the London 7/7 bombings (see weblinks right).

Conclude with a brief class discussion giving each group the opportunity to put forward their views.

Explain that in order to further explore the key question about what really matters in relation to 9/11 the class will be investigating different responses to acts of violent terrorism in this session.

Play the interviews of Susan Retik and Mohammad Razvi on the World Trade Centre memorial website (see resources).

Ask students to work in pairs or threes; half of the class will focus on the post 9/11 work of Susan Retik and the other half on Mohammad Razvi. Hand out the reflection sheets from units 5 and 6 of the Tribute WTC materials (see resources) and ask students to engage with the personal experience questions. There are five questions on each sheet, so assign a different question to different pairs or threes. After some discussion time, ask students to feedback briefly on their reflections. Ask them how religion and belief feature in the work of these two individuals.

If there is time, you can also play the interviews with Jarret Brachman and Bill Braniff on the 9/11 Memorial website (see resources).

Finish the session with a reading of the ‘Thoughts for Today’ by religious leaders from Radio 4 (see resources). These could be read aloud by students. Ask them to reflect on how these statements are being put into action by individuals like Susan Retik and Mohammad Razvi.


Students:

  • engage with the personal stories of some of those most directly affected by the events of 9/11

  • understand the way in which some individuals attempted to turn a tragedy into an opportunity to build bridges between very different communities;

  • reflect on the responses of religious leaders to 9/11 and in doing so build their own increasingly sophisticated picture of how different beliefs and values can affect the ways in which people respond to times of great difficulty.

Key vocabulary:

‘9/11’, ‘7/7’, conflict, forgiveness, justice, conflict resolution.

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Links to websites:



  • BBC – 60 Second Sermons - Forgive Your Enemies

  • BBC Newsnight – clip featuring some of those affected with their recollections of events and how they have been affected subsequently

  • BBC – Julie Nicholson’s account (she lost her daughter on 7/7) of the 7/7 bombings inquest

9/11 Memorial Museum https://www.wtc.com/memorial

  • Reflection sheet 5 – Empowering women globally

  • Reflection sheet 6 – from since 9/11 website

  • 9/11 Memorial – interviews with Jarret Brachman and Bill Braniff






Key Question: What’s to be done? What really matters in religion and belief?


Supplementary Questions:

(a) What rights and responsibilities do I have?

(c) How do religions and beliefs encourage their members to be a force for good in the world? (Religious practices such as prayer, meditation, charitable giving, giving time to those in need, spoken and written advice and guidance, etc)?

(d) How do religions and beliefs engage in dialogue with one another?



Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Stage 5a

Students will:



  • create a school display on what can be learnt from 9/11.

Remind the students of their work so far: investigating the concepts of ‘conflict’, ‘forgiveness’, ‘justice’ and ‘conflict resolution’, exploring some of the beliefs and values that may be involved in conflict situations, examining possible causes of involvement in violent extremism, reflecting on examples of responses to such extremism.

Explain that the task for the next couple of lessons is to produce some introductory material for the school website or front of school display to commemorate an anniversary of 9/11. The aim is to introduce students in other year groups to the key factors that account for the impact of religion and belief on the events of 9/11 and beyond.

Assign small groups of two or three to work on ONE of the following topics, under the general heading of ‘9/11: What REALLY matters?’:

  • EXTREMISM! What makes someone turn to and away from violent extremism?


  • CONFLICT! What beliefs and values are involved in causing and resolving conflict situations?

  • VICTIMS & SURVIVORS! How do people respond to the suffering caused by violent extremism?

  • HEARTS AND MINDS! How do we begin to build bridges between ourselves and those seen as different, separate or opposed to us?

Provide the students with Hints and tips for students on producing your display (see resources) to help them produce their display materials along with some references to help with any additional research (see resources).

Share the level statements (see Record of Attainment below) and encourage students to include a critical appreciation of Christian, Muslim and other practices and ways of life in relation to the issues, alongside their own views on the impact of religious & non-religious beliefs and teachings on ‘What really matters in relation to 9/11 and extremist atrocities that have occurred since then’.



Students:

  • draw on their learning from the last few sessions;

  • select the key points they want to make about their assigned topic.

Key vocabulary:

‘9/11’, conflict, forgiveness, justice, conflict resolution, extremism.

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Links to websites:



References to help with the students’ project:

  • Biography Channel: Brief biographies of five of the terrorists involved in 9/11

  • The glossary in this document may be useful: https://www.quilliamfoundation.org/wp/wp-content/uploads/publications/free/islamic-state-the-changing-face-of-modern-jihadism.pdf
  • BBC – Julie Nicholson’s account (she lost her daughter on 7/7) of the 7/7 bombings inquest


Hints and tips for students on producing your display - see Since 9/11 resources





Key Question: What’s to be done? What really matters in religion and belief?

Supplementary Questions:

(a) What rights and responsibilities do I have?

(c) How do religions and beliefs encourage their members to be a force for good in the world? (Religious practices such as prayer, meditation, charitable giving, giving time to those in need, spoken and written advice and guidance, etc)?

(d) How do religions and beliefs engage in dialogue with one another?



Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Stage 5b

Students will:



  • complete a school display on what can be learnt from 9/11.

Give the students sufficient time to complete their display materials and remind them of the need to provide a justification for their own views.

Provide support to the student groups by encouraging creative responses to the key question, and the use of evidence and referenced opinion to justify their findings.


(see resources).

Focus attention on the level statements as students develop their responses to the issues.

The completed materials should result in a valuable resource for the school display on 9/11, demonstrating good levels of understanding of some highly complex issues.


Use the record sheet below to record students’ names according to how well they have done the task in this unit of work, especially as exemplified in the final task.

Key vocabulary:

‘9/11’, conflict, extremism, forgiveness, justice, conflict resolution.

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Links to websites:



REsilience: ‘Building confidence to handle contentious issues in RE >>

[REsilience is a programme of support for teachers when addressing contentious issues, particularly where such issues are sometimes used to justify extremism and violence]






© 2011 North Somerset & Somerset Councils

© 2011 Dave Francis

© 2016 Bath & North East Somerset, Bristol, North Somerset, Haringey & The Isles of Scilly Councils




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