Ba in Film Studies/Film and Literature – Year Three – 2015/16 Horror and the Gothic in Film and Television (FI325)

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BA in Film Studies/Film and Literature – Year Three – 2015/16

Horror and the Gothic in Film and Television (FI325)

Module tutor - Helen Wheatley




This module offers students the chance to explore a genre-based case study in depth, examining two interconnected genres (the Gothic and horror) that have a long and fascinating history in relation to both the development of screen-based media and the development of film and television studies as academic disciplines. This module will encourage students to attend to questions of genre, address and medium specificity, and will interweave the study of film and television in order to address and complicate these questions. It will read Gothic and horror films and programmes in relation to a range of theoretical/methodological positions (psychoanalysis, social/cultural history approaches, empirical audience research, etc.). In terms of its range, the module will (a) attend to the history of Gothic and horror programming on television, and its contemporary upsurge and (b) cover a history of classic and contemporary horror and Gothic cinema and the critical writing that surrounds it. We will also engage in discussion of how recent changes in the production, distribution and exhibition of horror cinema have impacted upon the development of the genre.
The course will be taught through a combination of lectures, seminars, and longer workshops. It will be assessed either by a 5,000 word essay on a topic developed in conversation with the module tutor or a 5,000 word portfolio (see below). You must be able to attend the module’s entire timetable as there will be no repeat screenings.
TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS

The module will be taught through a combination of lectures, screenings, and seminars/workshops. Preparatory reading will be required for each week’s sessions and further viewing will be recommended. There will be a handout each week, intended as an aid to following lectures and suggesting areas for seminar discussion, which you are advised to retain for revision purposes.

By the end of the module, you should have developed a critical, and in-depth, understanding of both of our case studies. You should be able to offer clear and precise critical accounts of the texts, theories and histories we have studied, both orally and in writing. For this reason it is important that you contribute fully to seminar discussion in an informed manner. Seminars will almost always combine discussion of the programmes screened in that week and of the reading set. You must come to seminars having done the required reading at least and made notes on it in preparation for contributing to discussion. If you find seminars difficult, please arrange to see me and we will discuss ways of managing this important aspect of your learning. This is a research module which has been designed with scope for you to pursue your own interests and lines of enquiry, and I hope you will enjoy the range and variety of the intellectual work you will be asked to do on this module. You are also encouraged to continue viewing outside of the module and to bring your interest in and engagement with this viewing to group discussion.
Viewing: Try to view widely in relation to this module. Watch outside of your normal viewing habits. Our seminar discussions will be enriched by your accounts of further viewing so do try to follow up on further viewing suggestions wherever possible (I do know this is a busy term for you all though!).

Reading: Please read widely and with an open, but critically engaged, mind. It is not possible for us to explore every interesting aspect of a programme or film’s context and critical history in lectures and seminars; you therefore need to become accustomed to doing this for yourself. You are not expected to read everything on the list, though you are certainly expected to read at least one book/article/chapter from your reading list before the seminar. I have prioritised the weekly reading below, but also given you suggestions for further reading; these suggestions are not exhaustive and evidence of further reading/research is essential for the production of your essays for this module. The extent of your reading and viewing will be evident in your assessed work and the exam, and your marks will reflect this. It is up to you to read this material critically and to make your own judgement about the scholarship on offer on your reading list. As usual materials will be in demand so plan ahead.

TIMETABLE
The usual timetable for this module will entail an introduced screening on Monday at 3.00, followed by a screening and either workshop or seminar session on Tuesday mornings until 1pm. Please note that our start times vary from week to week for this session so you must make sure that you check your course outline each week. All students will need to attend all of both Monday and Tuesday sessions (i.e. you cannot do another option in either of these slots), and you are advised that this is a fast moving course at third year level.
Seminar Groups (for the weeks where we have two seminar groups):
Group 1: Jake Benson, Amy Duffell, Alex Palmer, Ellie Csaszar, Daisy Richards, Arub Ahmed, Natasha Epstein, Tom Hemingway, Harry Eaton.
Group 2: Christiane Donovan, Rachel Elfassy Bitoun, Helen Thomas, Angus Gibson, Patrick Sambiasi, Katie Wallace, Elliott Howarth, Jess Corfield, Lydia Petrucci, Kambole Campbell.

ASSESSMENT


You may choose to follow one of the following paths for your assessment of this module. Both forms of assessment are due in on the 25th April (week 1 of summer term). Feedback is due back to you on 19th May.
EITHER

One 5,000 word research-based essay. Please note, I will not be circulating essay titles for this module, but rather holding individual tutorials with each of you to discuss the research topic you wish to work on and agreeing the essay title, in writing, before the end of the Spring term (there will be dedicated tutorial times for this in Week 10, though you are welcome to come and see me about this at any point from the start of term onwards). This enables you to follow your own research interests raised by the work we have done together and drawing on the critical literature we have read together. It can be a bit daunting to come up with your own title so start thinking about this and discussing it with me and with other students on the module as soon as you can – don’t leave until the last minute. You may write on films or programmes we have watched together in class or you may wish to develop your own research project that moves out from our class work. This is a research-based essay that should demonstrate extensive reading and viewing as well as a careful engagement with the critical issues we have explored together.

Good essays will have the following features:


  • A logical structure with a proper introduction and conclusion

  • A sense of purpose and argument and careful attention to the question at hand throughout

  • Evidence of in-depth engagement with the relevant critical literature (excellent work with show extensive reading/research)

  • Clear and accurate exposition of all key theoretical/critical terms.

  • An in-depth understanding of the genre/s or sub genre/s you are engaging with,

  • Detailed textual analysis of your chosen programme/s or film/s

  • An understanding of how these works are situated within their particular socio-historical and/or industrial context

  • A clear sense of how your examples relate to each other and the critical literature at hand

  • Careful referencing and a full, complete bibliography and filmography/teleography

OR
One 5,000 word film festival portfolio (this assignment has two parts):


Firstly, critically reflect on the programming of TWO or THREE horror film festivals, establishing the distinguishing features of each. As well as drawing on reports and reviews of each festival from Sight& Sound and other publications, and the catalogues and online archives of the festivals themselves, your reflection should engage with the critical literature on the film festival more broadly (see your reading list from week 5) to assess the programming strategies and ‘purpose’ of each festival. [ca. 3,000 words]

Festivals you could look at include UK festivals Film4 Fright Fest (London), Abertoir (Aberystwyth), Grimmfest (Manchester), Bram Stoker International Film Festival (Whitby), Celluloid Screams (Sheffield), as well as a wide array of festivals from further afield, such as the Brussels International Fantastic Film Festival, Scream Fest (Los Angeles), Bucheon International Film Festival (Bucheon City, South Korea) and others (there is a fairly comprehensive list of key festivals here: http://www.raindance.org/essential-horror-and-fantasy-film-festivals/).

Secondly, create a programme, consisting of a minimum of SIX films, for either an extant horror film festival or a new horror/Gothic film festival. You do not have to focus on new films and can draw on your knowledge of film/television history to programme a retrospective if you wish. Your programme should be given a clear introduction which explains the critical motivation for its focus and choice of films (500 words) and also list the films with credits (title, director, release date, runtime) and a ca. 200-word synopsis for each film. You might also choose to indicate how you would incorporate events into your programme (e.g. interviews, round-table/Q&A sessions, social events, etc.), giving a clear rationale for their place in the programme [ca 2,000 words in total]
Good portfolios will have the following features:


  • A critical reflection with a logical structure with a proper introduction and conclusion, a persuasive argument and insightful analysis of the festivals at hand

  • A sense of purpose and argument and careful attention to the question at hand throughout

  • Evidence of in-depth engagement with the relevant critical literature (excellent work with show extensive reading/research)

  • Clear and accurate exposition of all key theoretical/critical terms.

  • Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the genre/s or sub-genre/s you are engaging with,

  • A programme which is inventive and original, and which is carefully framed by its introductory statement.
  • All elements of the portfolio should be well-written and well-presented (according to the Departmental guidelines for the presentation of assessed work), but special attention will be paid to the presentation of the festival programme which should incorporate illustration. You may choose to present this element of the work in a ‘brochure’ style rather than in a traditional ‘essay’ format.



Week 1: Horror films and television - mapping the debates

Monday

3-4: Lecture

4.10-5.20: Screening - Frankenstein (James Whale, US, 1931)

Tuesday

10-10.50: Screening – American Horror Story: Murder House (Brad Falchuk Teley-Vision/Ryan Murphy Productions/20th Century Fox Television, 2011) ‘Episode 1’

11-12: Seminar 1

12-1: Seminar 2


Reading


  • Noël Carroll ‘Why Horror? ‘ in his The Philosophy of Horror Or Paradoxes of the Heart (Routledge) pp. 158-195 also collected in Mark Jancovich (ed) (2002) Horror: The Film Reader (Routledge)

  • Christine Gledhill and Michael Grant (1999) ‘The Horror Film’ in Pam Cook and Mieke Bernink (eds) The Cinema Book (2nd Edition) BFI, pp. 194-204.

  • Matt Hills (2005) ‘TV Horror’ in his The Pleasures of Horror (Continuum) pp. 111-128.


Further Reading


  • Wheeler Winston Dixon (2010) A History of Horror (Rutgers University Press)
  • Eric Freedman (2005) ‘Television, horror and everyday life in Buffy the Vampire Slayer’ in Michael Hammond and Lucy Mazdon (eds) The Contemporary Television Series (Edinburgh University Press)


  • Lorna Jowett and Stacey Abbott (2013) TV Horror: Investigating the Dark Side of the Small Screen (IB Tauris)

  • Stephen King (1981) Danse Macabre (Macdonald Futura Publishers)

  • Tony Magistrale (2005) Abject Terrors: Surveying the Modern and Postmodern Horror Film (Peter Lang)

  • Colin Odell and Michelle Le Blanc (2007) Horror Films (Kamera Books)

  • Paul O’Flinn (1986) ‘Production and reproduction: the case of Frankenstein’ in Peter Humm, Paul Stigant and Peter Widdowson Popular Fictions (Methuen) 196-221 (also in Jancovich – see above)

  • S.S. Prawer (1980) Caligari’s Children: the Film as a Tale of Terror (Oxford University Press)

  • Gregory A. Waller(1987) ‘Made for television horror films’, in his American Horrors: Essays on the Modern Horror Film (University of Illinois Press), pp. 139-60.

  • Paul Wells (2000) The Horror Genre: From Beelzebub to Blair Witch (Wallflower)

  • Helen Wheatley (2006) Gothic Television (Manchester University Press)

  • Robin Wood (1985) ‘An introduction to the American horror film’ in Bill Nichols (ed) Movies and Methods Volume Two (University of California Press) pp. 195-219
  • Rick Worland (2007) 'Frankenstein (1931) and Hollywood expressionism' in his The Horror Film: An Introduction (Blackwell)



Week 2. Gothic film and television: exploring the female Gothic

Monday

3-4: Lecture

4-6.10: Screening - Rebecca (Alfred Hitchcock, US, 1940)

Tuesday

9.30-11.30: Screening – Woman in White (BBC1, 1997)

11.35-1: Workshop
Reading


  • Helen Hanson (2007) 'Reviewing the female Gothic heroine: Agency, identification and feminist film criticism' in her Hollywood Heroines: Women in Film Noir and the Female Gothic Film (IB Tauris) pp. 33-62 - N.B. Chapter 3: 'Narrative journeys of the female Gothic heroine' is also very useful if you're writing about this material.

  • Alison Milbank (1998) ‘Female Gothic’, in M. Mulvey-Roberts (ed.) The Handbook to Gothic Literature, (Macmillan) pp. 53-7.



Further reading

N.B. Some of this reading (marked with an asterisk) focuses primarily on Gothic literature, but will be useful if you’re writing your essay on this genre. This reading also relates to next week’s work




  • Bell, James, ed. (2013) Gothic – The Dark Heart of Film (BFI)

  • Fred Botting (1996) Gothic (Routledge) *
  • Mary Anne Doane (1981) ‘Caught and Rebecca: the inscription of femininity as absence’, Enclitic, 5-6: 75-89.


  • Mary Anne Doane (1987) ‘The “woman’s film”: possession and address’, in Christine Gledhill (ed.) Home is Where the Heart Is: Studies in Melodrama and the Woman’s Film (BFI) pp. 283-98.

  • Umberto Eco (1979) The Role of the Reader (Indiana University Press)

  • Umberto Eco (1994) Six Walks in the Fictional Woods (Harvard University Press)

  • Kate Ferguson Ellis (1989) The Contested Castle: Gothic Novels and the Subversion of Domestic Ideology (University of Illinois Press) *

  • Ed Gallafent (1988) ‘Black satin: fantasy, murder and the couple in Gaslight and Rebecca’, Screen, 29:3, pp. 84-103.

  • Helen Hanson (2007) Hollywood Heroines: Women in Film Noir and the Female Gothic Film (IB Tauris)

  • Tamar Heller (1992) Dead Secrets: Wilkie Collins and the Female Gothic (Yale University Press) *

  • Karen Hollinger (1993) ‘The female Oedipal drama of Rebecca from novel to film’ Quarterly Review of Film and Video, 14: 4, pp. 17-30

  • Lisa Hopkins (2005) Screening the Gothic (University of Texas Press)

  • William Hughes, David Punter, and Andrew Smith (eds) (2013) The Encyclopedia of the Gothic (Wiley-Blackwell).
  • Lynne Joyrich (1992) ‘All that television allows: TV melodrama, postmodernism, and consumer culture’, in Lynne Spigel and Denise Mann (eds) Private Screenings: Television and the Female Consumer (University of Minnesota Press) pp. 227-251.


  • Alison Milbank (1992) Daughters of the House: Modes of the Gothic in Victorian Fiction (Macmillan)*

  • Robert Miles (1994) ‘Introduction to special number: female Gothic’, Women’s Writing, 1: 2, pp. 131-142.

  • Tania Modleski (1982) ‘The Female Uncanny: Gothic Novels for Women’ in her Loving with a Vengance (Routledge), pp. 59-84. *

  • Tania Modleski (1982) ‘ “Never to be thirty-six years old”: Rebecca as female Oedipal drama’, Wide Angle, 5:1, 34-41.

  • Laura Mulvey (1986) ‘Melodrama in and out of the home’, in Colin MacCabe (ed.) high Theory/Low Culture: Analysing Popular Television and Film (St Martin’s Press) pp. 80-100.

  • Joanna Russ (1993) ‘Someone’s trying to kill me and I think it’s my husband’ in J.E. Fleenor (ed.) The Female Gothic (Eden) pp. 31-56 *

  • Diane Waldman (1983) ‘“At last I can tell it to someone!”: feminine point of view and subjectivity in the Gothic romance film of the 1940s’ Cinema Journal, 23:2, pp. 29-40

  • Helen Wheatley (2006) ‘The female Gothic: women, domesticity and the Gothic adaptation’ in Gothic Television (Manchester University Press) pp. 90-121


Week 3. Gothic film and television: ghosts and the uncanny

Monday

3-3.50: Lecture

4-6: Whistle and I’ll Come to You (BBC1, 1967), Remember Me (BBC1, 2014).

Tuesday

9.15-10.50: The Babadook (Australia, 2014)

11-12: Seminar 1

12-1: Seminar 2



Reading


  • Sigmund Freud (1919) “The Uncanny” – available online at https//wiki.uiowa.edu/download/attachments/570/Freud-Uncanny.pdf – start with this

  • Helen Wheatley (2006) ‘Showing less, suggesting more: the ghost story on British television’ from Gothic Television, Manchester University Press

  • Please also do your own research on the release of the Babadook. The film’s director, Jennifer Kent, gave a number of articulate and interesting interviews on its release.


Further reading – see also the further reading from last week


  • Aviva Briefel (2009) ‘What Some Ghosts Don’t Know: Spectral Incognizance and the Horror Film’ Narrative, 17: 1

  • Glen Creeber (2004) Serial Television, BFI Publishing – see the section on Riget.
  • Ruth Goldberg (2004) “Demons in the family : tracking the Japanese ‘uncanny mother film’ from A page of madness to Ringu” in Barry Keith Grant and Christopher Sharrett (eds) Planks of reason : essays on the horror film, Scarecrow Press


  • Lee Kovacs (1999) The Haunted Screen: Ghosts in Literature and Film, McFarland

  • Karen Lury (2010) ‘Hide and Seek: Children and Ghosts in Contemporary Japanese Film’ in her The Child in Film: Tears, Fears and Fairytales, IB Tauris, 17-52.

  • Steven Peacock (2009) ‘Two Kingdoms, Two Kings’ Critical Studies in Television, 4, 2: 24-36.

  • David Punter (2000) A companion to the Gothic, Blackwell

  • Steven Hay Schneider (ed) (2004) Horror film and psychoanalysis: Freud's worst nightmare, Cambridge University Press.

  • Catherine Spooner and Emma McAlvoy (eds.) (2007), The Routledge Companion to Gothic, Routledge – has chapters on Gothic film, media and television (see Eddie Robson’s chapter in particular)

  • Robert Spadoni (2007) Uncanny bodies: the coming of sound film and the origins of the horror genre, University of California Press

  • Timothy R. Tangherlini (2001) ‘Ghost in the machine: Supernatural threat and the state in Lars von Trier's Riget’, Scandinavian Studies, 73:1, p.1-24.


Week Four: Horror and society: Britain

Monday

3-4: Lecture

4.10-5.40: Screening - Taste the Blood of Dracula (Peter Sasdy, UK, 1970)


Tuesday

9.45-11.15: Screening – Eden Lake (James Watkins, UK, 2008)



11.25-1: Workshop
Reading


  • Andrew Tudor (1974) Image and Influence (Allen and Unwin) chapter: ‘Cinema and Society: Film Movements’, 152-179.

  • Peter Hutchings (1993) ‘Horror and the family in his Hammer and Beyond: The British Horror Film (Manchester University Press, 1993) 159-185

  • EITHER Johnny Walker (2015) ‘Heartless Hoodies’ in his Contemporary British Horror Cinema: Industry, Genre and Society, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press OR Johnny Walker (2012) ‘A Wilderness of Horrors? British Horror Cinema in the New Millennium’ in Journal of British Cinema and Television 9.3: 436-56. I have ordered the former for the library, but if it doesn’t turn up in time we will read the journal article instead.


Further Reading


  • Steve Chibnall and Julian Petley (eds) (2002) British Horror Cinema (Routledge)

  • Ian Conrich (1997) ‘Traditions of the British Horror Film’, in Murphy The British Cinema Book (BFI)

  • Ian Conrich (2010) Horror Zone: The Cultural Experience of Contemporary Horror Cinema. London: I.B. Tauris, 2010.
  • Thomas Elsaesser (1982) ‘Social Mobility and the Fantastic: German Silent Cinema’, Wide Angle, 5:2; also in James Donald (ed) (1989) Fantasy and the Cinema (BFI) 23-38


  • Barry Forshaw (2013) British Gothic Cinema (Palgrave Macmillan)

  • Sue Harper, ‘The Scent of Distant Blood: Hammer Films and History’ in Tony Barta Screening the Past (Praeger, 1998)

  • Owen Jones (2011) Chavs: The Demonization of the Working Class, London: Verso.

  • Siegfried Kracauer (1947) From Caligari to Hitler (Denis Dobson) – Chapter 6 ‘Procession of Tyrants’ pp. 77-87, though it would also be useful to read the introduction of this book

  • Jonathan Lake Crane (1994) Terror and Everyday Life (Sage)

  • Jim Leach (2004) British Film (Cambridge University Press), particularly chapter 9

  • James Leggott (2008) Contemporary British Cinema: From Heritage to Horror. London: Wallflower.

  • Lennard, Dominic (2014) Bad Seeds and Holy Terrors: The Child Villains of Horror Film, Albany: State University of New York.

  • Robert Murphy (1992) Sixties British Cinema (BFI), particularly chapter 8

  • Kim Newman (ed) (1996) The BFI Companion to Horror (BFI)

  • Julian Petley (1986), ‘The lost continent’, in Charles Barr (ed) All Our Yesterdays (BFI)

  • David Pirie (1973) A Heritage of Horror: The English Gothic Cinema 1946-1972 (Gordon Fraser)
  • David Pirie (2008) A New Heritage of Horror: The English Gothic Cinema (I.B. Tauris)


  • Vincent Porter (1983) ‘The context of creativity: Ealing Studios and Hammer Films’, in Curran & Porter, British Cinema History (Weidenfeld & Nicholson)

  • James Rose (2009) Beyond Hammer: British Horror Cinema since 1970, Leighton Buzzard: Auteur.

  • James Rose (2012) ‘Horror’ in Emma Bell and Neil Mitchell (eds) Britain. Bristol: Intellect, 145-47.

  • David Sanjek (1994) ‘Twilight of the monsters: The English horror film 1968-1975’, in Winston Dixon, Re-viewing British Cinema, 1900-1992 (State University of New York Press)

  • M.J. Simpson (2012) Urban Terrors: New British Horror Cinema: 1997-2008, Hemlock Press.

  • David J. Skal (1993) The Monster Show: A Cultural History of Horror (Plexus)

  • Andrew Tudor (1989) Monsters and mad scientists: a cultural history of the horror movie (Blackwell)

  • Andrew Tudor (1997) ‘Why horror? The peculiar pleasures of a popular genre’ Cultural Studies 11: 3, pp. 433-63 also collected in Mark Jancovich (ed) (2002) Horror: The Film Reader (Routledge)

  • Imogen Tyler (2013) Revolting Subjects: Social Abjection and Resistance in Neoliberal Britain. London: Zed Books.

  • Ginette Vincendeau (2001) Film/Literature/Heritage (BFI) (the ‘Dracula’ section), pp. 91-104

Week Five – Exhibiting and distributing the Horror Film



Monday

3-4.30: Presentation and Q&A with Nia Edwards-Behi, co-organiser of Abertoir Horror Film Festival. N.B. You MUST attend this session if you wish to do the film festival portfolio for your assessment on the module



Tuesday

9.45-11.15: Presentation and Q&A with Johnny Walker on the distribution of the contemporary horror film



11.25-1: Screening: Salvage (Lawrence Gough, UK, 2009)
Reading


  • Thomas Elsaesser (2013) ‘Film festival networks, the new topographies of cinema in Europe’ in Dina Iordanova (ed.) The Film Festival Reader, St Andrews: St Andrews Film Studies Press, pp. 69-96. (N.B. the collection of Nick Roddick’s articles from Sight and Sound collected in this volume under the title ‘Coming to a server near you: The film festival in the Age of Digital Reproduction’ is also an interesting read if you have time).

  • Anton Bitel (2015) ‘The best of FrightFest 2015’, Sight and Sound, 30 September, http://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/sight-sound-magazine/comment/festivals/best-frightfest-2015
  • Johnny Walker (2014) ‘Low Budgets, No Budgets, and Digital-video Nasties: Recent British Horror and Informal Distribution’ in Richard Nowell (ed.) Merchants of Menace: The Business of Horror Cinema, London and New York, Bloomsbury: pp. 215-228. N.B. I have ordered this for the library but will also circulate this piece of reading if it has not turned up.



Further Reading


  • Peter Bosma (2015) Film programming : curating for cinemas, festivals, archives, Wallflower Press

  • Brigid Cherry (2002) ‘Screaming for release: femininity and horror film fandom in Britain’ in Steve Chibnall and Julian Petley (eds) British Horror Cinema (Routledge)

  • Marijke de Valck (2007) Film festivals : from European geopolitics to global cinephilia, Amsterdam University Press

  • Alex Fischer and Dina Iordanova, eds. (2012). Sustainable Projections: Concepts in Film Festival Management. (Films Need Festivals, Festivals Need Films). St Andrews Film Studies.

  • Ina Rae Hark (ed.) (2001). Exhibition: The Film Reader. Routledge.

  • Joan Hawkins (1999) ‘Sleaze Mania, Euro-Trash, and High Art: The Place of European Art Films in American Low Culture’, Film Quarterly, Vol. 53, No. 2 (Winter, 1999-2000), pp. 14-29

  • Dina Iordanova (ed.) (2013). The Film Festival Reader. St Andrews Film Studies.

  • Dina Iordanova and Ragan Rhyne (eds.) (2009). Film Festival Yearbook 1: The Festival Circuit. St Andrews Film Studies.

  • Dina Iordanova and Ruby Cheung (eds.) (2010). Film Festival Yearbook 2: Film Festivals and Imagines Communities. St Andrews Film Studies.
  • Dina Iordanova and Ruby Cheung (eds.) (2011). Film Festival Yearbook 3: Film Festivals and East Asia. St Andrews Film Studies.


  • Dina Iordanova and Leshu Torchin (eds.) (2012). Film Festival Yearbook 4: Film Festivals and Activism. St Andrews Film Studies.

  • Dina Iordanova and Stephanie van de Peer (eds.) (2014), Film Festival Yearbook 6: Film Festivals and the Middle East. St Andrews Film Studies

  • Alexander Marlow-Mann, ed. (2013). Film Festival Yearbook 5: Archival Film Festivals. St Andrews Film Studies.

  • Richard Porton (2009) Dekalog. 03, On film festivals, Wallflower Press.

  • Jeffrey Ruoff (ed.) (2012). Coming Soon to a Festival Near You: Programming Film Festivals. St Andrews Film Studies.

  • Johnny Walker (2015) Contemporary British Horror Cinema: Industry, Genre and Society, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

  • Cindy Hing-Yuk Wong (2011) Film festivals : culture, people, and power on the global screen, Rutgers University Press.


Week Seven: Body Horror

Monday

3-4: Lecture

4.10-5.40: Screening – The Thing (US, 1982)

Tuesday

9.30-11.15: Screening – Dexter (Showtime, 2006-2013), Anatomy for Beginners (Channel 4, 2005)


11.30-1: Workshop
Reading


  • Andrew Tudor (1995) “Unruly Bodies, Unquiet Minds” Body and Society, 1:25, 25-41 Online journal, available via the library website – this is the key piece of reading this week

  • Julia Kristeva (1982) ‘Approaching abjection’ in her Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection, New York: Columbia University Press – available online here: http://seas3.elte.hu/coursematerial/RuttkayVeronika/Kristeva_-_powers_of_horror.pdf

  • Simon Brown, and Stacey Abbott, (2009), ‘The art of splatter: Dexter, CSI, Bones and body horror’, in Doug Howard, Doug (ed.) Investigating Dexter, London, U.K.: I.B. Tauris, pp. 205-20. – if time


Further Reading


  • Pete Boss (1986) ‘Vile Bodies and Bad Medicine’ Screen (1986) 27(1): 14-25

  • Barbara Creed (1986) ‘Horror and the Monstrous-Feminine: An Imaginary Abjection’, Screen (1986) 27(1): 44-71 – also collected in Mark Jancovich (ed) (2002) Horror: The Film Reader (Routledge) and see also Creed’s book The Monstrous Feminine

  • Mark Browning (2007) David Cronenberg : author or film-maker? (Intellect)

  • Barbara Creed (2005) Phallic Panic: Film, Horror and the Primal Uncanny (Melbourne University Press)
  • Rayna Denison and Mark Jancovich (2007) – ‘Mysterious Bodies’, Special Edition of the journal Intensities, 4, December 2007


  • Eric Freedman (2005) ‘Television, horror and everyday life in Buffy the Vampire Slayer’ in Michael Hammond and Lucy Mazdon (eds) The Contemporary Television Series (Edinburgh University Press)

  • Matt Hills (2005) ‘TV Horror’ in his The Pleasures of Horror (Continuum) pp. 111-128

  • Stephen King (1981) Danse Macabre, London: Macdonald Futura Publishers.

  • Jonathan Lake Crane, Terror and Everyday Life (Sage, 1994)

  • Ernest Mathijs (2008) The cinema of David Cronenberg : from baron of blood to cultural hero (Wallflower)

  • Louisa Ellen Stein (2011) ‘Gruesome competition for cable viewers : masters of horror, auteurism, and the progressive potential of a disreputable genre’ in Michael Kackman et al Flow TV : television in the age of media convergence (Routledge)

  • Gregory A. Waller(1987) ‘Made for television horror films’, in his American Horrors: Essays on the Modern Horror Film (University of Illinois Press), pp. 139-60.

  • Linda Williams (1990) Hard Core: Power, Pleasure and the ‘Frenzy of the Visible’ (Pandora Press)

  • Linda Williams (1991) ‘Film Bodies: Gender, Genre, and Excess’ Film Quarterly, 44:4


Week Eight. Gender, genre, and the final girl: reading the slasher/stalker/splatter film

Monday

3-4: Lecture

4.10-5.45: Screening - Halloween (John Carpenter, US, 1979)

Tuesday

9.30-11: Screening – Texas Chainsaw Massacre (Tobe Hooper, US, 1974)

11-12: Seminar 1

12-1: Seminar 2


Reading


  • Carol Clover (1987) ‘Her body, himself: Gender in the Slasher film’, Representations 20 (Fall), pp. 205-228 (Online journal, available via the library website – this is the key piece of reading this week) also collected in Mark Jancovich (ed) (2002) Horror: The Film Reader (Routledge) and see also Clover’s book Men, Women and Chainsaws (Princeton University Press).

  • Judith Halberstam (1995) ‘Bodies that Splatter: Queers and Chainsaws’ in her Skin Shows: Gothic Horror and the Technology of Monsters (Duke University Press)


Further reading


  • Rhona A. Berenstein (1996) Attack of the Leading Ladies: Gender, Sexuality and Spectatorship in Classic Horror Cinema (Columbia University Press)

  • Brigid Cherry (1999) ‘Refusing to refuse to look: Female viewers of the horror film’ in Melvyn Stokes and Richard Maltby (eds) Identifying Hollywood’s Audiences (BFI) pp. 187-203 also collected in Mark Jancovich (ed) (2002) Horror: The Film Reader (Routledge)
  • Vera Dika (1990) Games of Terror : Halloween, Friday the 13th, and the Films of the Stalker Cycle (Associated University Presses)


  • Jay McRoy (2010) ' "Parts is parts": Pornography, Splatter films and the politics of corporeal disintegration' in Ian Conrich (ed.) Horror Zone (IB Tauris)

  • Tony Magistrale (2005) Abject Terrors: Surveying the Modern and Postmodern Horror Film (Peter Lang)

  • Jim Morton (1999) ‘Road kill: Horror on the highway’ in Jack Sargeant and Stephanie Watson Lost Highways (Creation Books) pp. 120-128

  • Steve Neale (1981) 'Halloween: suspense, aggression and the look' Frameworks 14, pp. 25-29 - also in Barry Keith Grant (ed) Planks of Reason: Essays on the Horror Film (Scarecrow) and Barry Keith Grant and Christopher Sharrett (eds.) Planks of Reason: Essays on the Horror Film Revised Edition (Scarecrow)

  • Richard Nowell (2011) Blood Money: A History of the First Teen Slasher Film Cycle (Continuum)

  • Isabel Cristina Pinedo (1997) Recreational Terror: Women and the Pleasures of Horror Film Viewing (State University of New York Press) particularly chapters 2 and 3

  • Christopher Sharrett (1984) ‘The idea of apocalypse in The Texas Chainsaw Massacre’ in Barry Keith Grant (ed) Planks of Reason: Essays on the Horror Film (Scarecrow) also collected in Barry Keith Grant and Christopher Sharrett (eds.) Planks of Reason: Essays on the Horror Film Revised Edition (Scarecrow)
  • Sue Short (2006) ‘Sex and the Final Girl: Surviving the Slasher’ in her Misfit Sisters: Screen Horror as Female Rites of Passage (Palgrave Macmillan)


  • Linda Williams (1996) 'When the woman looks' in Barry Keith Grant (ed.) The Dread of Difference: Gender and the Horror Film (University of Texas Press) pp. 15-34

  • There is also a very good documentary held in the library you ought to watch if you are thinking of writing on this subject: The American Nightmare (Adam Simon, 2002)


Week Nine. Understanding the zombie


Monday

3-4: Lecture

4.10-5.45: Screening - Død Snø/Dead Snow (Tommy Wirkola, Norway, 2009)

Tuesday

9.45-11.15: Screening – Dead Set (E4, 2008), In the Flesh (BBC3, 2013-14)



11.30-1: Workshop
Reading


  • Sven Jüngerkes and Christiane Wienand (2012) ‘A Past that Refuses to Die: Nazi Zombie Film and the Legacy of Occupation’ in Bridges, Lugt, and Magilow (eds), Nazisploitation!: The Nazi Image in Low-Brow Cinema and Culture, Continuum.

  • Lorna Jowett and Stacey Abbott (2013) ‘TV as Horror’ in their TV Horror: Investigating the Dark Side of the Small Screen (IB Tauris) pp. 179-200
  • Allan Cameron (2012) ‘Zombie Media: Transmission, Reproduction, and the Digital Dead’ Cinema Journal 52:1 (Online journal, available via the library website)



Further Reading


  • Kyle William Bishop (2010) American Zombie Gothic : the Rise and Fall (and Rise) of the Walking Dead in Popular Culture (McFarland & Co)

  • Stephanie Boluk and Wylie Lenz (eds) (2011) Generation Zombie: Essays on the Living Dead in Modern Culture (McFarland)

  • Kevin Alexander Boon (2007) ‘Ontological Anxiety Made Flesh: The Zombie in Literature, Film and Culture’ in Niall Scott (ed.), Monsters and the Monstrous: Myths and Metaphors of Enduring Evil (New York: Rodopi B.V., 2007),

  • Deborah Christie and Sarah Juliet Lauro (2011) Better off Dead : the Evolution of the Zombie as Post-Human (Fordham University Press)

  • Peter Dendle (2007) ‘The Zombie as Barometer of Cultural Anxiety’ in Niall Scott (ed.), Monsters and the Monstrous: Myths and Metaphors of Enduring Evil (New York: Rodopi B.V., 2007)

  • Richard Dyer (1988) ‘White’, Screen, 29/4, 44-64; also collected in his (2002) The Matter of Images (Routledge) pp. 126-148

  • R.H.W. Dillard (1987) ‘Night of the Living Dead: It’s not like just a wind that’s passing through’ in Gregory A. Waller (ed.) American Horrors (University of Illinois Press)

  • Barry Keith Grant (1996) The Dread of Difference –129-154
  • Hunt, Leon et al (eds) (2013) Screening the Undead: Vampires and Zombies in Film and Television (I.B. Tauris)


  • Shawn McIntosh (2008) ‘The Evolution of the Zombie: The Monster That Keeps Coming Back’ in Marc Leverette and Shawn McIntosh (eds), Zombie Culture: Autopsies of the Living Dead (Maryland: Scarecrow Press, pp. 1-2.

  • Cynthia Miller (2011) ‘The Rise and Fall – and Rise – of the Nazi Zombie in Film’ in Christopher Moreman and Cory James Rushton (eds), Race, Oppression and the Zombie: Essays on Cross-Cultural Appropriations of the Caribbean Tradition, Jefferson, NC: McFarland.

  • Christopher M. Moreman and Cory James Rushton (eds) (2011), Zombies Are Us: Essays on the Humanity of the Walking Dead, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc.

  • June Pulliam (2007) ‘The Zombie’ in S. T. Joshi (ed.), Icons of Horror and the Supernatural: An Encyclopedia of Our Worst Nightmares, Volumes 1 & 2, Westport: Greenwood Press.

  • Jon Stratton (2011) ‘Zombie trouble: Zombie texts, bare life and displaced people’ European Journal of Cultural Studies, 14:3, 265-281.

  • Gregory A. Waller (1986) The Living and the Undead (University of Illinois Press)

  • Tony Williams (1996) ‘Far from Vietnam: the family at war’ in his Hearths of Darkness (Associated University Press) pp. 129-154
  • Robin Wood (1986) ‘Normality and monsters: The films of Larry Cohen and George Romero’ in his Hollywood from Vietnam to Regan (Columbia University Press) pp. 95-134



Week Ten. Children's horror



Monday

3-4: Lecture

4.10-5.45: Screening - The Hole (Joe Dante, US, 2009)

Tuesday

9.45-11.20: Screening – Goosebumps (YTV, 1995-98), Dramarama Spooky (CITV, 1983), Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids (Carlton, 1999-2010)

11.30-1: Workshop

Wednesday

1.30-4: Coursework tutorials


Reading


  • Amy M. Davis (forthcoming) ‘Scaring the Children: Horror Films for the Younger Audience,’ in Jessica McCort, ed. Unpleasant Tales: The Wonderland of Horror in Children's Literature (University of Mississippi Press) – I will supply you with a copy of this if the book is not published by the time we need it.

  • Sue Short (2006) ‘Telling Tales: Fairy Tales and Female Rites of Passage Narratives’ in her Misfit Sisters: Screen Horror as Female Rites of Passage (Palgrave Macmillan)


Further reading


  • Filipa Antune (2014) ‘Children and Horror after PG-13: The Case of The Gate,’ Networking Knowledge 6:4, pp. 18-28.

  • Bruno Bettelheim (1976) The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales. London: Penguin.

  • Geraldine Brennan, Kevin McCarron and Kimberley Reynolds, eds. (2001) Frightening Fiction. London: Continuum – particularly the introduction


  • David Buckingham (1996) ‘Distress and delight: children’s experience of horror’, in his Moving Images: Understanding Children’s Emotional Responses To Television (Manchester University Press)

  • Lorna Jowett and Stacey Abbott (2013) TV Horror: Investigating the Dark Side of the Small Screen (IB Tauris) particularly the chapter ‘Mainstreaming Horror’

  • Vladimir Propp (1968 (1988)). Morphology of the Folktale. 2nd edition. Translated from Russian by Laurence Scott. Austin: University of Texas Press.

  • Maria Tatar (2009) Enchanted Hunters: The Power of Stories in Childhood. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.

  • Marina Warner (1998) No Go the Bogeyman: Scaring, Lulling, and Making Mock. London: Chatto & Windus.

  • Owen Weetch, (2012 ‘Reading Parallax: 3D Meaning Construction in The Hole,’ CineAction 89, pp. 14-21.

  • Helen Wheatley (2012) ‘Uncanny Children, Haunted Houses, Hidden Rooms: Children’s Gothic Television in the 1970s and ‘80s,’ Visual Culture in Britain 13:3, pp. 383-97.








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