Benchmark Course Objectives Examples



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World Language

Communications

Benchmark Course Objectives Examples


  1. Greet and respond to greetings.

2. Introduce and respond to introductions.





Latin I

Latin II

Latin III

Latin IV – V

Latin I

Latin II
Latin III


Latin IV-V




Students will:

  1. learn simple greetings and use them at the beginning and end of each class.

Students will:



  1. read and use Latin greetings as used by soldiers in the Roman army.

Students will:



  1. read letters and plays written by Roman authors, recognize and translate the different types of greetings.

Students will:



  1. read Roman poetry, recognize and translate greetings.

Students will:



  1. introduce themselves to other students in Latin and to ask another student his/her name.

Students will:



  1. read Latin stories and recognize and translate introductions.

Students will:


  1. read authentic Latin letters and plays and translate introductions.

Students will:



  1. read authentic Latin poetry and recognize introductions.



Students in Latin I begin and end each class with Latin greetings.


Students in Latin II translate stories about the Roman infantry that include greetings and their responses.

Students in Latin III read the letters of Cicero to his best friend Atticus. They learn to recognize the salutations and valedictions used in letters.

Students in Latin IV-V translate Catullus 31 in which he addresses his homeland Sirmio and Ovid’s “Tristia” in which he addresses Augustus and asks for permission to return from exile.


Students in Latin I introduce themselves to the class and respond to simple questions.

Students in Latin II briefly interview other students in Latin. Common questions involve favorite hobbies, classes and teachers. Students then explain the likes and dislikes of the person that has been interviewed in Latin to the entire class.


Students in Latin III-V read authentic Latin

literature in which characters are introduced

and described .




Benchmark Course Objectives Examples

  1. Ask and answer questions.

4. Make and respond to requests.




Latin I

Latin II


Latin III
Latin IV-V

Latin I


Latin II

Latin III

Latin IV-V


Students will:

  1. listen to recorded Latin stories and answer comprehension questions.

  2. ask and answer questions about family members, occupations and maps of the Roman Empire.

  3. master question words - quis, quid, ubi, cur, quo modo, nonne, num.

Students will:



  1. read Latin stories and answer comprehension questions.

  2. master Indirect Question clauses.

Students will:



  1. ask and answer questions about the Commentaries of Julius Caesar and the letters of Cicero and Pliny.

  2. ask and answer questions about the ancient Roman Forum, the city of Rome and the Roman Empire.

Students will:



  1. ask and answer questions about the poems of Ovid, Catullus, Horace and Vergil.

Students will:



  1. write a Latin letter using polite phrases, e.g. Si placet tibi, Ago gratias tibi, ita vero, minime.

Students will:



  1. respond a Latin letter.

  2. master the verbs - volo, nolo.

  3. master Indirect Command clauses.

Students will:



  1. demonstrate reading comprehension by answering simple Latin questions about the authentic Latin prose passages that they have read.

Students will:



  1. respond appropriately to more complex questions about authentic Latin poetry that they have read.


Students in Latin I Listen to and read a story about the Caecilii family from Pompeii in 79 AD. They then respond to oral Latin questions asked about this family.

Students in Latin II complete readings and exercises that teach imperfect and pluperfect subjunctive and their use in indirect questions.

Students in Latin III question the strategies of Julius Caesar in his Gallic campaign.

Students in Latin IV-V ask and answer questions in Latin to learn the identity of a famous classical character whose name has been taped to their back.


Students in Latin I write a letter to Saturn in scroll form. The letter requests gifts for the festival of Saturnalia. This letter is graded on creativity, noun and verb endings and adjective agreement.
Students in Latin II respond to the letters written by Latin I students, using the same criteria.

Students in Latin III respond to questions about Pliny’s letters to Trajan. In these letters Pliny requests advice on how to govern the province of Bythinia.


Students in Latin IV-V read Virgils’ Aeneid, Book I, to analyze Venus’ request to Jupiter and his response. Venus reminds Jupiter that he has promised to make her son Aeneas the founder of a new race.

Benchmark Course Objectives Examples


5. Express likes, dislikes and feelings

6. Express Needs

7. Express Agreement and

Disagreement



Latin I-II

Latin III-V


Latin I

Latin II-V

Latin I – II

Latin III-V


Students will:

  1. Appropriately use the verbs amo, volo, nolo cupio plus the infinitive.

  2. Use adjectives such as: laetus, tristis, occupatus, felix.

  3. Use adverbs such as bene, optime,

male, pessime.

  1. master noun/adjective agreement in order to express emotions.

Students will:

1. read odes, epodes and lyric poetry.


  1. read and translate clauses of Purpose and Fearing

  2. Formulate likes, dislikes and feelings towards various literary texts and authors.

Students will:



  1. Appropriately use constructions such as necesse est, debeo and volo plus infinitive

  2. Appropriately use si placet tibi, ago gratias tibi.

Students will:



  1. Appropriately use Passive Periphrastic and Dative of Agent.

Students will:



  1. Appropriately use : ita vero, minime, paene, semper, saepe, numquam

  2. Determine if statements are true or false

Students will:

1. Appropriately use Indirect Statement.


  1. Translate passages from Cicero, Pliny and Petronius and then formulate opinions about the validity of Roman authors’ opinions.


Students in Latin I create brief Latin sentences, using proper case and verb endings, to describe their own personalities.

Students in Latin II briefly interview other students in Latin. Common questions involve favorite hobbies, classes and teachers. Students then describe the likes and dislikes of the person who has been interviewed to the entire class in Latin.

Students in Latin IV-V translate the poetry of Catullus to discern the tone and mood of the poet using sounds word order and word choice. Class time is set aside each day for students to discuss their own opinions of the poem and the feelings evoked by the poet.

Students in Latin I read Latin stories about farm life in Roman Britain. Rufilla, a wealthy Roman woman living in the provinces, expresses many needs.

Students in Latin III, after mastering the passive periphrastic, read and translate a Latin story about the requirements of public and private life in ancient Sparta.

Students in Latin III, after reading some of Emperor Trajan’s responses to Pliny, discuss whether they agree or disagree with the way in which the problems of Provincial governors were handled.

Students in Latin IV-V translate Catullus’ Carmen 49, either an incredibly laudatory or invective poem. Students form opinions about the tone of this poem using word choice, word order and figures of speech to back up their answers.


Benchmark Course Objectives Examples


  1. Give and follow directions

9. Provide and obtain information and knowledge.



Latin I

Latin II

Latin III

Latin IV-V


Latin I


Latin II

Students will:

  1. Create and execute commands for use in a classroom situation, e.g. Ambula ad fenestram, currite ad ianuam.

  2. Use and follow negative commands.

  3. Add direct and indirect object pronouns to their commands.

Students will:


  1. Recognize and use Indirect Commands.

Students will:



  1. Read the letters of Pliny and Cicero, which give directions to family members and friends.

Students will:



  1. Read the epigrams of Martial and poetry of Horace, which give advice for day-to-day living.

Students will



  1. Learn to count from 1-20 in Latin and use Roman numerals.

  2. Recognize nominative, genitive, dative, accusative and ablative endings for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd declensions.

  3. Recognize present, imperfect, future, perfect and pluperfect tenses, active voice.




  1. Use Roman numerals from 1-1000.

  2. Recognize the nominative, genitive, dative, accusative and ablative of the 4th and 5th declensions.

  3. Recognize present, imperfect, future, perfect, pluperfect and future perfect tenses in the active and passive voices.

  4. Recognize imperfect and pluperfect subjunctive in active voice.

  5. Compare adjectives in the positive, comparative and superlative degrees.

  6. Work with Temporal clauses, Conditional clauses and clauses of Purpose and Result.

  7. Use present, perfect and future participles.

Students in Latin I play a form of “Scipio Says” using lists of commands that they have created.

Students in Latin II translate passages about the life of a Roman legionary. The daily requirements of life are explained using indirect commands.

Students in Latin IV-V translate Horace’s “Carpe diem” in which he commands his readers to share his Epicurean philosophy of life.
Students in Latin I respond to comprehension questions based on the reading selections.

Students in Latin II write synopses, active and passive, indicative mood.




Benchmark Course Objectives Examples



10. Obtain new information and knowledge.




Latin III

Latin IV-V


Latin I


Latin II

Latin III


Latin IV-V

Students will:

  1. Use present, perfect and future infinitives.

  2. Recognize imperfect and pluperfect subjunctive in the passive voice and present and perfect subjunctive, in active and passive voice.

  3. Read and write Ablative Absolute, Passive Periphrastic and Ablative of Agent.

Students will:



  1. Recognize figures of speech, i.e. anaphora, assonance, asyndeton, anastrophe, chiasmus, litotes, synchesis, polysyndeton and zeugma.

  2. Continue to work with previously learned grammatical concepts and recognize them within the poetry that is being read.

Students will:



  1. Sing songs in Latin, which provide an introduction to Roman culture, numbers, case and verbal endings.
  2. Read and translate Latin stories that provide background information on cultural topics, e.g. gladiators, Roman comedy, eruption of Mt. Vesuvius.

Students will:



  1. Read Latin passages that deal with ancient Alexandria, and Roman Britain.

  2. Locate and organize information to research Roman culture through the use of books, journals and the Internet. Read Latin passages that deal with ancient Alexandria, and Roman Britain.

Students will:

Read authentic Latin passages that deal with early Roman heroes, government during the Roman Republic, Roman provincial government, the Roman army, and Roman dinner parties.
Read Latin poetry from the Golden age of

Roman poetry.



Students in Latin III translate passages from Caesar’s Gallic Wars with an eye not only for vocabulary for identifying verb tenses and noun cases.
Students in Latin IV-V translate passages of poetry, identifying the figures of speech found and their effect on the meaning of the passage.
Students in Latin I and II sing teacher-developed songs that to reinforce tense and case endings.

Students in Latin II visit the MFA to tour the collection of Roman amphorae. They collect information with the idea of later their own amphora.


Students in Latin III translate parts of the “Satyricon” to gain a better understanding of lavish Roman dinner parties.

Students in Latin IV-V visit Medieval Manuscripts sites on the Internet. They collect information which will help them create their own manuscript.




Benchmark Course Objectives Examples

11. Describe, Compare, Contrast

12. Explain, Interpret

13. Narrate


Latin I-V

Latin I


Latin II

Latin III


Latin IV-V

Latin I

Latin II-III



Latin IV-V

Students will:

  1. Write short sentences or poems in Latin that describe themselves or a character from a Latin story.

  2. Analyze Latin stories to compare and contrast characters and customs.

Students will:



  1. Read a Latin story and interpret the motivations of a character.

  2. Explain actions on a poster or comic strip.

Write Latin sentences to describe a character in a story.


Translate the letters of Pliny and Cicero and the Commentaries of Caesar and interpret the motives and beliefs within each one.


  1. Translate numerous Latin poems and analyze them for theme, mood, tone, sounds and figures of speech.

  2. Recognize, explain and interpret content and meter of the authors that have been read.

Students will:



  1. Read aloud in Latin with proper pronunciation and appropriate expression.

  2. Act out skits in Latin.




  1. Students recount the events of a reading or video.

  2. Read aloud with more accurate pronunciation and meaningful phrase grouping.

Students will:



  1. Read poetry aloud with attention to such features as metrical structure, meaningful phrase grouping and appropriate voice inflection.

In Latin I students write short sentences of description using the correct endings on nouns and adjectives.

In Latin II students write sentences which describe people in the class, using the comparative and superlative forms of adjectives.

Students in Latin III write an essay comparing the Roman army to the Gallic army.

Students in Latin IV-V write 5 line Latin poems, using nouns, adjectives, verbs and artwork to describe a character from one of the readings.

Students in Latin I and II interpret a character’s actions through the cartoons that begin each chapter.

Students in Latin III are read the Annales of Livy and interpret his motives for writing these stories.

Students in Latin IV-V learn 3 meters – dactylic hexameter, elegiac couplet and hendecasyllabic. They then scan the lines of Ovid’s Metamporphoses to interpret the mood that the author intended.
Student in Latin I perform skits in Latin to dramatize different scenes from the text.

Students in Latin II sing Latin songs and read aloud Latin passages to perfect their pronunciation.

Students in Latin III create a Latin fairy tale containing 6 newly assigned vocabulary words.

Students in Latin IV-V read passages of Ovid’s Metamorphoses using the correct meter and intonation.




Benchmark Course Objectives Examples


  1. Solve Problems

15. Read and Discuss Authentic

Literature


Latin I-II

Latin III-V

Latin I-II
Latin III

Latin IV-V



Students will:

  1. Appropriately use Roman numerals.

  2. Group Latin words together to form a correct sentence.

  3. Solve Latin crossword and word puzzles.

When using a dictionary, use context and logic to choose among possible word or phrase translations.

Suggest possible solutions to a socio-cultural problem, an interpersonal conflict or a political clash.

Students will:



  1. Memorize and discuss Latin Sententiae used in English.

  2. Read and translate Latin tomb inscriptions.

  3. Translate short, highly glossed Latin poems.

Read authentic Latin prose passages that deal with early Roman heroes, government during the Roman Republic, Roman provincial government, the Roman army, and Roman dinner parties. The Roman authors Livy, Pliny, Julius Caesar, Cicero, Tacitus and Petronius are all read.


Read selections from the poetry of Catullus, Horace, Martial, Ovid and Vergil.

Students in Latin I solve math problems using Roman numerals/Latin numbers.

Students in Latin II solve word problems that involve the characters in the readings.

How did the Romans engineer and construct catapults that not only had distance but also accuracy?

Students in Latin III construct mini-catapults that fire marshmallows. These catapults are judged for authenticity, distance and accuracy.


Students in Latin IV-V discuss the civil war preceding the reign of Augustus and the ways in which interpersonal problems were handled.

In Latin I and II students are responsible for 120 Latin phrases used in English and are expected to use these phrases in their own sentences.


In Latin III students translate Tacitus’ account of the fire in Rome during the age of Nero and draw personal conclusions about whether or not Nero was to blame.

Students in Latin IV-V translate Catullus’ Carmen 85 “Odi et Amo.” They discuss the word choice, word order, sounds and tone. It is then compared to Smokey Robinson’s “You’ve really got a hold on me,” set to that music and sung by the class. The class then strolls to the song as they sing it.




Culture




Benchmark Course Objectives Examples


  1. Identify Cultural and Linguistic

Characteristics

17. Compare and Contrast Cultural and

Linguistic Characteristics, Identifying

similarities and differences.




Latin I

Latin II

Latin III

Latin IV-V

Latin I


Students will:

  1. Analyze Latin readings to discover ancient cultures and attitudes in Pompeii and Roman Britain.

  2. Read Latin fables to compare ancient morals to those of today.

Students will:



  1. Analyze Latin readings to discover cultures and attitudes in ancient Alexandria and Rome.

  2. Watch films to identify and describe cultural characteristics e.g. occupational and gender roles.

Students will:



  1. Analyze Latin readings to discover ancient cultures and attitudes in the times of Cicero, Caesar, Pliny, Tacitus and Petronius.

Students will:



  1. Read poetry by Horace, Ovid and Catullus, that identifies the acceptable behaviors of the day.

Students will:



  1. Analyze campaigning, elections and political systems of the Romans and of their own society.
  2. Compare ancient and modern school, theater, sports, houses and families.


  3. Discuss the cultural diversity of the Roman Empire.

  4. Learn to recognize root words in English taken from Latin.

  5. Compare the use of the 5 cases in Latin to those of the 3 cases in English.

  6. Decline English pronouns and conjugate English verbs and compare the structure of the language with Latin.

  7. Identify the principal Roman gods and heroes by their names, deeds and spheres of influence.

In Latin I students are constantly encouraged to identify Latin root words used in English words and to draw conclusions about the meanings of words due to these roots.

Students in Latin II read and translate several chapters about the multicultural society of ancient Alexandria. Comparisons are made to the turmoil that still exists in that part of the world today.


Students in Latin III translate the histories of Livy which personify the Roman virtue of Pietas. Students compare Pietas to the attitudes of today’s American society.

Students in Latin IV-V translate “the City Mouse and the Country Mouse” by Horace and compare the life of a farm worker to that of a wealthy citizen.

Students in Latin I role-play a mock election from ancient Pompeii, using campaign managers, placards and graffiti. They then compare ancient and modern elections.

Benchmark Course Objectives Examples

17. (con’t)

18.React appropriately in a social

situation.


Latin II

Latin III

Latin IV-V

Latin I

Latin II


Students will:

  1. Compare ancient and modern medicine, military, and heroes.

  2. Discuss Roman artifacts such as strigil, fibula to understand customs of bathing or dress among the ancients.

  3. Compare the religious cults of ancient times to religions today.

  4. Connect the art of ancient glassblowing to the economy of ancient Alexandria.

Students will:



  1. Identify the architectural features of Greek and Roman buildings still in use today.

  2. Compare the armies of Sparta, Hannibal and Caesar to those of today.

  3. Compare the speeches of Cicero to those of present day orators.

  4. Contrast the lavish Roman dinner parties to those of today.

  5. Compare the role of women in ancient and modern times.

Students will:

1. Identify the main characters in the Trojan War and their influences on our literature, art and music.

2. Read Homer’s Iliad in English and compare it to Vergil’s Aeneid after translating it from Latin.
Students will:


  1. Demonstrate appropriate behaviors when taken on field trips to museums and competitions.

  2. Use the phrases mea culpa, ignosce mihi, si placet tibi, ago gratias tibi in class when necessary.

Learn appropriate behavior when reading stories about Roman schools or a day at the races.


Students in Latin II study Roman baths in great detail. Through books, posters and the Internet students become aware of the similarities and differences.

Students in Latin III translate sections of Petronius’ Satyricon. After reading this description of a Roman dinner party, students compare Roman dinners to those of today and then sponsor their own dinner party using information from Petronius.

Students in Latin IV-V study the Trojan War in depth through readings of the Aeneid and the Iliad. The roles of ancient and modern heroes are contrasted.

Students in Latin I translate passages about Roman banquets and then host their own banquet.

Students in Latin II memorize passages of “Horatius at the Bridge” and perform these lines in a dignified manner for other classes.




Benchmark Course Objectives Examples


18. (con’t)



Latin III

Latin IV-V



Students will:

  1. Learn appropriate behavior when translating passages about a Roman wedding or the Roman army.

Students will:



  1. Learn appropriate behavior when translating passages about a Roman funeral.



Students in Latin III re-enact a Roman wedding. This includes a marriage contract and sequence of events. There will be a bride, groom, and mother of the bride, maid of honor and priest. The rest of the class comprises the wedding guests and cooks for the banquet.

Students in Latin IV-V act out a Roman funeral after reading several descriptions of funerals.




Connecting




Benchmark Course Objectives Examples


19. Examine and analyze cultural

contributions of diverse groups



Latin I

Latin II


Latin III

Latin IV-V



Students will:

  1. Read Latin stories, listen to classical Latin music and then discuss the differences and/or common roots to English stories and music.

Students will:



  1. Trace the influence of Roman social and political institutions on the societies of Britain and Alexandria.

  2. Examine the cultural contributions of Egypt, and Rome on today’s society.

Students will:



  1. Examine the cultural contributions of Greece on today’s society.

  2. Create an art project based on an artifact or custom from ancient cultures, explaining its history and uses.



  1. Translate the love poetry of Catullus, Ovid and Horace and examine its influence on the art, music and literature of Western civilization.

  2. Translate Vergil’s AENEID and analyze its Greek roots and its influence on the arts.




Students in Latin I read Latin passages about the contributions of the ancient Romans to government, theater, medicine and architecture.

Students in Latin II study amphorae from the Greeks and Romans. A visit to the MFA in Boston rounds out the study. Students then form and design a Greek pot using their own ideas of themes and design.


Students in Latin III study the development of Greek sculpture and its influence on the Renaissance.

Students in Latin IV-V recognize the classical allusions written by authors such as Shakespeare, Tennyson and Chaucer.



Participating



Benchmark Course Objectives Examples

20. Use a world language to connect with

other disciplines such as Arts, English

Language Arts, Health, Mathematics,

Science and Technology, Social

Studies


Latin I

Latin II


Latin III


Students will:

  1. Label maps of the ancient world in Latin and English and trace Roman trade routes.

  2. Compare Latin root words to root words in French and Spanish.

  3. Complete math problems using Roman numerals.

  4. Contrast the popularity of Roman comedy to the Greek tragedies read in English classes.

  5. Compare concepts of Roman slavery to American slavery.

  6. Sing Latin songs

  7. Visit a local art museum to view the classical collection.

Students will:



  1. Identify parts of the human skeleton that have Latin names.

  2. Visit the MFA to view the collection of Greek and Roman amphora.

  3. Create their own amphora.

  4. Study the Roman history of Britain and Alexandria.

  5. Learn legal Latin phrases.

Students will:



  1. Write a Latin fable.

  2. Translate stories describing heroic events from ancient Athens and Sparta.

  3. Translate stories covering the history of Rome from Romulus to Nero.

  4. View slides of Greek sculpture.

  5. Visit the MFA to see authentic Greek sculpture.

  6. Listen to portions of Orff’s Carmina Burana.



Students in Latin I label a map of Europe first with provinces of the Roman Empire and then with current place names.

Students in Latin II label the bones of a human skeleton with the correct Latin name and then research the reason why these particular names were given.

Students in Latin III translate many passages from Livy and Tacitus which describe the history of the Roman Republic and Empire.




Benchmark Course Objectives Examples



21. Participate in community activities



Latin IV-V

Latin I

Latin II
Latin III

Latin IV-V



Students will:

  1. Listen to portions of Orff’s Carmina Catulli.

  2. View slides of art works that portray the Trojan War.

  3. After reading the poetry of Catullus and Martial, compare and contrast how people spent their leisure time in ancient cultures and how they spend it today.

  4. Recognize classical language roots in scientific terms.

  5. Develop an understanding of musical terms based on Latin roots.

  6. After reading 45 poems of Catullus, write an analytical paper about his style, beliefs or characters.

  7. Make a sketch that personifies a passage.

  8. Write an English poem that parallels a Latin epigram or poem.

  9. Analyze the events of the Trojan War and its effect on people involved

Students will:



  1. Recognize product names, which were influenced by Latin and Greek.

Students will:


  1. Research Latin mottoes from colleges, states and organizations and create posters, which display the mottoes and their meanings.


  2. Present plays for other classes or parents.

Students will:



  1. Enter essay contests sponsored by Classical Association of New England.

  2. Create valentines and manuscripts based on Roman love poetry and display them on bulletin boards.

Students will:



  1. Attend lectures provided by Classics professors from Boston-area colleges.

  2. Enter state and national contests requiring knowledge of the language and culture of the Romans.




Students in Latin IV-V research medieval illuminated manuscripts on the Internet. The art teacher gives a 45 minute calligraphy lesson. Students then create their own manuscript using the words of a Catullus poem.

Students in all levels of Latin are encouraged to attend field trips that have involved plays with a classical theme, concerts of classical music and lectures by professors of classics





Benchmark Course Objectives Examples


  1. Identify and describe careers where

knowing more than one language is useful

Throughout each

level


Students will continue their study of:
  1. Root words and their influence upon the fields

of medicine, law and science.


  1. The classical themes found in literature, music, art and architecture.

  2. Latin as the basis for English and the further

study of the romance languages.


  1. Interact with community members who are

involved in a variety of careers to understand

how they have used their study of classical



languages.


Almost yearly trips to the classical collections of the Worcester Art Museum and the MFA in Boston provide the knowledge that a combination of Classics and Art History is a sine qua non for a museum curator.
Latin provides a sound basis for the life-long learner who wants to pursue fields that are grounded in this language, i.e.medicine, law, literature and architecture.






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