Bronx Academy High School



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Bronx Academy High School

1440, Story Ave, Bronx, NY, 10473



Integrated Algebra

Student Handbook

Spring – 2010

Mr. Sam, Teacher

Ms. Joyce. Smith, A.P.

Ms. Patrice. English-Young Principal





Success is a necessity not an option!
Why do we have to study Math?
Math helps us to think logically. We carefully state the problem, plan out our solution, execute steps in the appropriate order, and evaluate the solution.
Math helps us to identify patterns and relationships. Two things that may at first glance appear very different may turn out to be mathematically very similar.

Math helps us keep score - not just in sports, but in everything that we measure: time, distance, money, cooking quantities, building materials, etc. Math helps us make better choices: Is the economy size of toothpaste really worth it? How much highway driving makes a hybrid car a better value? Sometimes math helps us make the best choice. Is there a way to use the least amount of fencing to cover a certain area?

Math is crucial in the natural sciences like physics and chemistry, but it is also important in the social sciences such as economics and sociology. Most college majors require at least some mathematics. Limiting the math that you study may limit your career options.

Math has connections to subjects where you might not expect it - art, music, and poetry are a few. Did Shakespeare really write all the plays commonly attributed to him - mathematicians have attempted to answer this.

If you are in school now, you may live for another fifty years, or more. Technology is changing so rapidly, and no one can predict the skills that people will need in the workplace or at home in the coming years. Most math teachers would be willing to bet that you will be better prepared for the future by getting a good background in math.


Math can be fun. Just as we play games, do crossword puzzles, and read mysteries for fun, math shares characteristics with all of these.



Mr. Sam’s Grading Policy for Algebra I and II


1. Homework


15%



2. Class work

(Includes Do now and Exit slip)

30%


3. Academic Rigor

(Attendance, Class Participation, Preparedness for Class, Following of Electronics Policy,

On Time to Class )



15%


4. Quizzes


10%


5. Tests

30%

Total



100%



Expectations
Classroom Rules


  1. Be respectful and responsible.

  2. Follow directions.

  3. Bring all the materials needed for learning every day.

  4. Ask permission first.

  5. Keep hands, feet and objects to your self.


Classroom Procedures

  1. Sign in the attendance log when you come to class.
  2. If you are late, sign in the late log.


  3. Copy down, the objectives and the homework assignment.

  4. Complete the warm up.

  5. Follow teacher direction during class and at dismissal.


Things to remember


  1. Please keep all the unnecessary materials out of sight (cell phone, I-pod, food and drinks, etc.)

  2. If you did not get the grade you expected, then your work did not meet my expectation.

  3. Due dates are always closer than they appear.


Student contract
I have read the class room rules, procedures, and I am aware of the grading policy. I am also aware of the fact that if I do not follow the above mentioned guidelines it will affect my grades and final score in this class.
Student name: _____________________

Student signature___________________ Date_______________
Teacher: Mr. Sam




Do Now Activity



    1. Will be given only to students who arrive to class on time [prior to the late bell]




    1. Each Do Now Activity will be graded on a daily basis; total value will be 100 points. Anyone on time and attempts the Do Now Activity will receive a grade no lower than 65 points. At the end of each term all Do Now Activities will be averaged out.


    1. Do Now Activity is 20% of the total class work grade





    1. Failure to complete Do Now activities will result in a lower class average and it will adversely affect your class work grade.



Exit Slip
Daily exit slips will be given at the end of each class period. This will summarize for you what you learned in class each day and also give me an idea of what you understood and don’t understand. It will have one or two questions related with the topic covered on that day.
Exit Slip is 20% of the total class work grade

Class work (30%)
The Do now activity and the Exit slip are included in the class work grade, which will be 40% of the class work grade. The other 60% of the class work grade will be based on the criteria given below.

  1. Copying the guided practice examples from the board.

  2. Answering word problems and exercises from the text book.

  3. a. Note Taking

b. Maintaining a Separate Note Book.

c. Note book will be checked and graded once a week

4. Completing the independent practice work



Homework (15%)
1. Homework will be given Monday to Thursday.


  1. Homework will be graded on a scale of 100 to 0. Scores will be based on how well the questions are answered. At the end of each marking period the average of all the Homework grades will be taken. Late home work will only get half the grade.

3. Failure to complete Homework will result in a lower class average.




Attendance Requirements for High School Students
The Bronx Academy High School attendance policy requirement states, in part that in order to be granted academic credit for a course, a student must earn a passing grade in that course and attend each class a minimum of 85% of the time the class is in session.


  1. The high school attendance requirements policy states, in part, to be granted academic credit for any course, a student must earn a passing grade in the course and not be absent more than 20 class sessions of a full-year course.



  1. Students who accumulate 21 consecutive daily absences from school and who are not subject to NYS Compulsory Attendance Rules may be dropped from enrollment due to their truancy.




  1. Students with inconsistent attendance in school will receive a grade of 45, failure due to poor attendance.

Negative points.
Points shall be taken away for the following

Using cell phone and other electronic gadgets in the class is a major distraction for the scholars. (Every time a scholar is seen using, cell phone or any other electronic gadget, 5 points will be deducted from the final grade)



Algebra I Course Outline


  1. Rules of Exponents/Scientific Notation

  1. How do we simplify expressions using rules of exponents?

  2. How do we convert numbers into scientific and standard notation?

  3. How do we order numbers using scientific notation?


  4. How do we use scientific notation to compute products and quotients of numbers?

  5. How do we simplify numerical expressions

  6. Review

  7. Test




  1. Operations/ Algebraic Expressions

  1. What do you understand by algebraic expressions?

  2. How do we classify algebraic expressions?

  3. How do we evaluate algebraic expressions?

  4. How do we translate an English sentence into an algebraic expression?

  5. Review

  6. Test




  1. Polynomials/Operations with polynomials

  1. How do we add monomials and polynomials?

  2. How do we subtract monomials and polynomials?

  3. How do we multiply monomials?

  4. How do we use the distributive property to multiply polynomials by a monomial?

  5. How do we find the product of polynomials?

  6. How do we find the product of polynomials?

  7. How do we divide polynomials?

  8. How do we divide a polynomial by a monomial?

  9. Review

  10. Test


IV. Solving Equations

  1. How do we solve an equation of the type?

  2. How do we solve equations containing like terms on one side of the equal sign?

  3. How do we solve equations which contain variables on both sides of the equal sign?

  4. How do we solve equations containing parentheses?

  5. Review

  6. Test

V. Verbal problems

1. How do we solve a literal equation?

2. How do we solve verbal number problems using equations?

3. How do we solve problems involving consecutive integers?

4. How do we solve problems involving consecutive even or odd integers?

5. How do we solve more complex problems leading to linear equations?

6. How do we solve verbal problems involving proportion that lead to linear equations?

7. How do we solve verbal problems involving finding percent of a number?

8. How do we solve verbal problems involving percentage increase and decrease?

9. Review


10. Test
VI. Inequalities


  1. How do we solve a linear inequality in one variable?

  2. How do we solve inequalities with variables on both sides of the inequality?

  3. How do we solve a verbal problem which leads to inequality?

  4. Review

  5. Test


VII. Graphing Linear Equations

  1. How do we find the slope of a line?

  2. How do we identify the slope and the y-intercept of a straight line from its equation?

  3. How do we graph a linear equation using slope intercept method?

  4. How do we use a graph to express a linear relationship with a real world context?

  5. What is the relationship between the slopes of two parallel lines?

  6. What is the relationship between the slopes of two perpendicular lines?

  7. Review

  8. Test


VIII. System of equations.

  1. How do we find the common solution fore a system of two linear equations?

  2. How can we use a substitution to solve a system of linear equations, with integers?

  3. How do we graph a linear inequality?

  4. Review

  5. Test


Algebra II Course Outline

  1. Statistics

  1. How do we compute the range and measures of central tendency for a given set of data?

  2. How can we use a five statistical summary to construct a box and whisker plot?

  3. How can we construct frequency tables and organize data into a histogram?

  4. How do we organize data into a cumulative frequency histogram?

  5. How do we create a scatter plot of bivariate data?
  6. For a given set of data, how do we normally construct a reasonable line of best fit?


  7. How can we use the line of best fit to predict unknown values?

  8. Review

  9. Test


II. Probability

  1. How can we use a Venn diagram to solve problems?

  2. How can we apply probability to problems involving spinners, dice, coins or cards?

  3. How can we use tree diagrams and the counting principle to find probabilities?

  4. How do we find conditional probability?

  5. How can we find the probability of “A or B” and “A and B”?

  6. How do we find probabilities of sampling with and without replacement?

  7. What do we mean by permutation?

  8. What do we mean by combination?

  9. Review

  10. Test


III. Perimeter, Area, Volume and Surface Area

  1. What is meant by perimeter of triangles, squares and rectangles?

  2. How do we find the area of a rectangle and a square?

  3. How do we find the area of a parallelogram and triangles?

  4. How do we find the area of a trapezoid?

  5. How do we find the circumference of a circle?

  6. How do we find the area of a circle?

  7. How do we find the area of complex figures?

  8. How do we find the surface are of a solid figure?

  9. How do we find the volume of a rectangular prism and a cube?

  10. How do we find the volume of pyramids, cylinders and cones?

  11. Review

  12. Test


IV. Factoring

  1. What is meant by factoring?

  2. How can we factor quadratic trinomials?

  3. How do we factor the difference of two squares?

  4. How can algebraic expressions be factored completely?

  5. Review


  6. Test




    1. Rational and Irrational numbers, Pythagorean Theorem

  1. How do we simplify radicals with numerical radicands?

  2. How do we add or subtract radicals?

  3. How do we multiply and divide radicals with numerical radicands?

  4. What is the Pythagorean Theorem?

  5. How do we apply Pythagorean Theorem to solve problems?

  6. What are trigonometric ratios?

  7. How do we use trigonometric to solve a right triangle problem?

  8. How do we apply trigonometric ratios to solve verbal problems?

  9. How do we solve trigonometric problems involving angle of elevation and depression?

  10. Review

  11. Test


VI. Quadratic equations

  1. How do we solve a quadratic equation?

  2. How do we solve more difficult quadratic equations?

  3. How do we solve verbal problems leading to a quadratic equation?

  4. How do we solve consecutive integer problems leading to a quadratic equation?

  5. How do we solve area problems leading to a quadratic equation?

  6. Review

  7. Test


VII. Graphing Quadratics

  1. How do we graph a quadratic equation in two variables?

  2. How can we graphically solve a system of equations involving a parabola and a system?

  3. How can we solve a quadratic linear system algebraically for systems with integers?

  4. Review

  5. Test


VIII. Algebraic fractions

  1. How can we reduce fractions?

  2. How can we reduce algebraic fractions involving polynomials?
  3. How can we multiply and divide fractions containing monomial expressions?


  4. Fractions with like polynomial denominators?

  5. Review

  6. Test

Math Notebook Rubric



CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Points

Headers/Footers

No required headers and or footers are missing within the notebook.

One or two required headers and/or footers are missing within the notebook.

Three or four required headers and/or footers are missing within the notebook

More than four required headers and/or footers are missing within the notebook.




Homework/Class work

All homework and class work are included with all the work shown. All incorrect homework and class work are corrected.

Most homework and class work is included but all the work is not shown. Most of the answers are corrected.

Most homework and class work is included but no work is shown.

Little or none of the homework is included, none of the work is shown.




Notes Requirements

All notes are complete with all sketches/graphs labeled and example problems included.

Most notes are complete with sketches/graphs labeled and example problems included.


About half of the notes are complete with sketches/graphs labeled and example problems included.

Very few notes are included. Very few example problems included.




Vocabulary Requirements

All vocabulary is clearly identified and includes a definition.

Missing 2 vocabularies. Words are clearly identified and include a definition.

Missing five or more vocabulary words. Words are not clearly defined.

Missing seven or more vocabulary words. Words are not clearly defined.




Organization requirements

All sections are in an organized order. The notes are set in order according to the date.

Some of the sections are in order.

Most of the notebook is not in order.

Work is not organized in order.




Neatness Requirements

Overall notebook is kept very neat. No doodles are present and handwriting is legible.

Overall notebook is in satisfactory condition. No doodles are present and handwriting is legible.

Overall notebook is kept below satisfactory condition. There are doodles in the notebook and or the handwriting is not legible.

Notebook is a mess or there is no notebook. Doodles are everywhere and the handwriting is not legible.






Exams & Quizzes
All exams will be in the following format;


  1. Multiple choice questions (MCQ), correct answer worth one point each.




  1. Open ended questions (Part II), each correct answer worth two points.




  1. Open ended questions (Part III), correct answer worth three points each.




  1. Open ended questions (Part IV), correct answer worth four points each.



  1. All questions, whether MCQ or open ended, will be Regents based questions or Regents style questions.

Part I through Part IV will be graded according to regent’s standard.



Math - Problem Solving Rubric



CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Pictorial representation

Can represent a math problem with a clear picture or model.

Can draw a picture of the original situation.

An attempt was made to use pictures or drawings, but it is only partially clear.

No pictorial attempt was made to represent the math problem.

Verbal description

Complete, clear sentences describe the math problem.

The situation is partially communicated, but not as clearly as it could be.


Some attempt was made to represent the math problem, but it is unclear or only partly correct. Revision needed.

No verbal attempt was made to represent the math problem.

Algebraic description

A clear equation was constructed using at least one variable that accurately represents the situation.

An equation was written to represent the math problem, but no variables were used.

An incorrect or unclear equation was written.

No attempt was made to write an algebraic equation.

Check for Reasonableness

Clear evidence of reasonableness, either inverse operation, plugging into the equation, working pictures or verbal proof is given.

Partial evidence of thought as to reasonableness is given through some means.

An attempt to show reasonableness was made, but is incorrect or unclear.

No attempt to demonstrate reasonableness was shown.



Mathematics Grading Rubric



CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Tests

90+

80 to 89


70 to 79

below 69

Homework

all homework is completed and done correctly

missing 1-2 homework’s

missing 3-4 homework’s

missing more than 5 homework’s

Group work

student was an engaged partner, listening to suggestions of others and working cooperatively throughout lesson

student was an engaged partner but had trouble listening to others and/or working cooperatively

student cooperated with others, but needed prompting to stay on task

student did not work effectively with others

Neatness and organization

the work is presented in a neat, clear, organized fashion that is easy to read

the work is presented in a neat and organized fashion that is usually easy to read

the work is presented in an organized fashion but may be hard to read at times

the work appears sloppy and unorganized. It is hard to know what information goes together

Completion of work

all problems are completed

all but 1 of the problems are completed


all but 2 of the problems are completed

several of the problems are not completed

Use of mathematical terminology

correct terminology and notation are always used, making it easy to understand what was done

correct terminology and notation are usually used, making it fairly easy to understand what was done

correct terminology and notation are used, but it is sometimes not easy to understand what was done

there is little use, or a lot of inappropriate use, of terminology and notation

Written explanations

explanation is detailed and clear

explanation is clear

explanation is a little difficult to understand, but includes critical components

explanation is difficult to understand, and is missing several components OR was not included


CLASSROOM CODE OF CONDUCT


  • Arrive to class in time. Come prepared with books, notebooks, pens, pencils etc...

  • Cell phones, electronic devices and beepers should not be seen or heard in the classroom.

  • Bring ID and schedule at all times.

  • No hats, hoodies, visors, caps, scarves, bandannas, ‘do rags’ etc.

  • Dress appropriately for school.

  • Food, drinks and chewing gum are not to be eaten in the classroom.
  • No profanity. Respectful language and tone is expected toward staff and students.


  • Do not leave the class room without permission. Leave the classroom to go to the rest room, library or any other area of the building only with teacher’s permission and a hallway pass issued by the teacher. Sign out the log before going. Sign in after returning. Do not go to any other place using the bathroom pass. Do not leave the building during class time.

  • Home work should be completed on time and neatly.

  • Treat yourself and others with respect at all times.

  • No out of topic talking.

  • If the student is absent, produce document.

  • No wandering in the class.

  • No yelling, swearing, cursing. No calling out.










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