Capacity Building for Urban Sanitation Development Main Report


Assessing, Promoting and Meeting Sanitation Demands



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Assessing, Promoting and Meeting Sanitation Demands

Component C3 addresses assessing, raising and meeting urban people’s demands for various forms of improved sanitation, solid waste management and waste water disposal/storm water drainage.
Broad approaches are:


  • Consumers in central areas are encouraged to connect to and pay for centrally (city) planned, built and managed services (sewerage, solid waste services and drainage) which are gradually expanded to unserved city sections;

  • The city assists consumers in outlying and/or poor communities to plan, build, operate, maintain and manage communal solutions for excreta disposal, wastewater disposal, drainage and/or solid waste management.

The ISSDP approach includes special provisions for making centrally managed services more accessible for poor households and for giving local leaders and women and men a say in the local planning.




Local Capacity Building and Strategy Development

Gender in Programme Management

Although the project has no gender equality policy, the concept is well understood and informally practised. In employing consultants and staff, attention is paid to obtaining a good balance of male and female staff. A limitation for consultants is that s/he is minimally available for one month per trip. National staff is not hired part-time. This had initially a negative effect for both men and women staff, many of whom had to continue part-time teaching jobs. The current staffs do not have such obligations. An overview of the current staff composition is given in Table 2.

The table shows that for foreign as well as Indonesian staff, there are far fewer professional women than men. Among the foreign staff and consultants, the ratio is 14:3, for the Indonesian professional staff this is almost identical with 13: 3. Only for the secretarial and other support staff the ratio is 3:4. The highest levels of Indonesian staff are the co-manager (male) and the assistant-manager (female). One of the six city facilitators is also female. Not included in the table are Indonesian short term consultants.

Besides the need to be available for at least four weeks, a limiting factor in getting female national consultants for community aspects including gender and poverty is the lack of professionals in community development who have expertise in sanitation, hygiene and gender. For recruiting sector professionals who include gender expertise in their baggage, ISSDP does not yet use national or international networks such as the Gender and Water Alliance or Siyanda or the alumni of post-graduate gender and water/ health education of e.g. Wageningen University, the Royal Tropical Institute and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Gender and Development networks in Indonesia are Forum Komunikasi Wanita & Ekonomi, Koalisi Perempuan Indonesia and Aliansi Merah Putih, but none are specific for gender in water and environment related development.

Labour conditions are equal for women and men. One female staff member, who indicated that she does not feel comfortable travelling to the field alone, travels with a male colleague. National staff of both sexes get some opportunities for work-related training, e.g. in the courses on facilitation (in communities) and moderation (in workshops, etc.) from WASPOLA. This includes members of the secretarial staff, but there is no systematic policy. Staff who study in their spare time make individual arrangements to attend lectures and do exams. Career development and change opportunities depend on the Indonesian employers from whom staff are hired, e.g. MLD. Male and female staff can both spend work time at home when this is more efficient, e.g. for report writing, or needed, e.g. when children fall ill in the expectation that this will not reflect negatively on their work performance.


Table 2. Male and female staff and consultants in IDSSP by July 2007

No.

Name

Position

Male

Female

Foreign Staff

1.

Menno Oppermann

Team manager






2.

Jan Halter

MIS expert






3.

Bert Bruinsma

Financial and economic specialist






4.

Peter Hawkins

Infra. Reg. And legal reform specialist






5.

Dick de Jong

Advocacy specialist




6.


Peter Hawkins

Private sector participation specialist






7.

John de Bresser

Capacity building specialist






8.

Eric Buhl-Nielsen

Institution development specialist






9.

Hendrik Wittenberg

Sub team leader – Component C 3






10.

Anthony Waterkeyn

Advocacy specialist






11.

Donald Bason

Social marketing/promotion specialist






12.

Charlotte Matthiassen

Socio economic market researcher






13.

Cees Keetelaar

Sub team leader





14.

Rudolf van Ommen

Institution development specialist






15.

Christine Sijbesma

Social community specialist






16.

Yvo de Witte

MIS specialist






17.

Laura Coello

Geographer







Indonesian Staff

18.

Syarif Puradimadja

Co-team manager






19.

Eri Trinurini Adhi

Assistant team manager






20.

Satria Suryahadi

MIS specialist






21.

Aboejoewono

Institutional development specialist







22.

Amin Yusuf / M. Khalid

Institutional development specialist






23.

Suryanto

Sanitation strategy specialist






24.

Neny Triny Yanuaty R

Environmental health regulations






25.

A. Rukny Assegaff

Advocacy specialist






26.

Avianti Zulaicha

Capacity building specialist






27.

Asep Winara

Private Sector Participation Specialist






28

Lalu A Damanhuri

Private Sector Specialist






29.

Bambang Tata Samiadji


Financial and economic specialist






30.

Rianigustin Mozar

Gender Specialist






31.

Sapto Adji Dharmoyo

Promotion specialist /dep sub TL






32.

Risang Rimbatmaja

Socio Economic & Market researcher






33.

Honi Irawan

Social marketing, communications media






34.

Bob Sinarko Wibowo

City coordinator






35.

Suhari Astuti

City coordinator






36.

Teguh Sumiyarsa

CF Surakarta






37.

Richard Daniel


CF Blitar






Indonesian Staff

No.

Name

Position

Male

Female

38.

Amrizal Amir

CF Payakumbuh






39.

Dang Uro Winara

CF Banjarmasin






40.

Renan Jusal Indra

CF Denpasar






41.

Achdiat Antono

CF Jambi






42.

Pranoto

Financial & economic analyst






43.

Made Diani Setyawati

Financial & economic analyst






44.

Mulyono

Social scientist







45.

Dyah Ernawati

Social scientist






46.

Sovia Veronika

Institutional development specialist






47.

Theresia M Suyanto

City Neighbourhood SWM Facilitator






48.

Tjetjep S Gumelar

City SWM and O&M Facilitator






49.

Wita Purwasih

City SWM Facilitator






50.

Frans Ruslan Suwardi

Drainage Specialist






Supporting Staff

51.

Indih Endra Astuti

Office Manager




52.

Tri Widayati

Assistant Office Manager






53.

Mulyono Herman

IT/Website Specialist






54.

Eva Muzalifah

Bilingual Secretary for Team Manager






55.

Novitasari

Bilingual Secretary






56.

Anom Prasetyo

Operator Computer






57.

Jumadi

Messenger








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