Catholic university of america



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CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA


School of Library & Information Science

LSC/CLSC 559 Storytelling- Spring 2006

Thursday 4:10 pm – 6:40 pm, Marist Hall, Stone Room

Instructor: Dr. Mary Edsall

(edsall@cua.edu; phone 202-319-6277; cell 215-880-0119)



Office Hours:

Wednesday 3:00 pm-6:00 pm

Call or email for an appointment – email questions also welcome.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

LSC/CLSC 559, “Storytelling,” will explore several forms and genres of narrative or “story,” such as tale, myth, and legend as media for creating, collecting, preserving, and providing access to cultural heritage information. It will examine culturally diverse content within a variety of media, including books, comics, oral histories, still and moving images, performance representations, manuscripts, and juvenile literature. The course will address how information managers use stories in collection development, organization of knowledge in multi-format materials, library administration, and public programming, as well as identifying the role of personal story in professional development. It will discuss the ethical issues of storytelling in providing access to cultural heritage documentation. Through in-class performance and out-of-class project work, students will demonstrate how stories are used in various information service environments including: libraries, archives, museums, school media centers, and other community organizations and cultural institutions.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of the course, the student will be able to:

1. Articulate an understanding of the role of story and narrative in knowledge management.

2. Locate narrative content in a variety of knowledge media.

3. Demonstrate proficiency in identifying and performing appropriate story media for juvenile library clientele.

4. Discuss ethics, policies and procedures for the collection management and organization of story media in information service environments.

5. Capitalize on personal story in developing professional personae.
REQUIRED SOURCES

Estés, Clarissa Pinkola. Women who Run with the Wolves: Myths and Stories of the Wild Woman Archetype. New York: Ballantine. Books. 1995


ASSIGNMENTS

Class Participation, 25%

Children’s Book Performance, 25%

Journal/Personal Story Paper, 25 %

Knowledge Management Story Project, 25%
DUE DATES

February 28: Journal Due—Mid-term Review

April 20: Children’s Book In-Class Performance

April 27: Personal Story Paper Due

May 4: Knowledge Management Story Project Due
COURSE GRADE

Course grade will be based on the percentages listed above using an A-F scale.


CLASS ATTENDANCE

Class attendance is required. This course is being taught as a seminar, which is dependent upon the on-going participation of all class members. Discussion is cumulative and builds upon the contributions of participants week to week. Course activities include attending performances, field trips, and participating in class practica.

ADA ACCOMODATION

Students with disabilities requiring accommodation under federal regulations must present a written accommodation request to the instructor by the second class meeting. It is strongly recommended that the student contact the Office of Disability Support Services, Suite 207, Pryzbyla Center (202-319-5211; email cua-disabilityservices@cua.edu). This is the University office responsible for disability accommodation and services, and its staff can answer questions about services and requirements regarding documentation. Special accommodations or other arrangements cannot be made without documentation approved by this office.

ACADEMIC HONESTY

Please read policies on “Academic Integrity” included in the academic policies and procedures http://policies.cua.edu/list_bycat_dsp.cfm?cat=110 on the University's web page. Incidences of academic dishonesty, defined as “failure to observe rules of fairness in taking exams or writing papers, plagiarism, fabrication, and cheating” will result in a grade of F (0 points) on the project or exam in question, and will be reported to the Dean for possible further action (including failure in the course). See the web site or discuss the problem with your instructor if you have questions about what is involved in such offenses. Plagiarism, which the University defines to include "[1] intentionally or knowingly representing the words or ideas of another as one's own in any academic exercise; [2] failure to attribute any of the following: quotations, paraphrases, or borrowed information from print sources or websites; [3] buying completed papers from other to use as one's own work", will not be tolerated.

For more on what constitutes plagiarism and how to avoid it, see the guide on the Purdue Online Writing Lab web site http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/research/r_plagiar.html.

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES
January 12 Introduction: Locating the Self; Locating Narrative in Research

*** LIBRARY ARTICLE NARRATIVE ANALYSIS ASSIGNED ***


January 19 NO CLASS.

*** DOTHE LIBRARY ARTICLE NARRATIVE ANALYSIS***


January 26 Grimm’s Fairy Tales In-class Reading: “The Cat and Mouse in Partnership.”

Stories in Knowledge Management Environments Discussion



***LIBRARY ARTICLE NARRATIVE ANALYSIS DUE FOR IN-CLASS DISCUSSION ONLY***
February 2 American Ballet Theater Performance: Kennedy Center, 7:30pm
February 9 Juvenile Literature Discussion; Guest Faculty Lecture and Reading:

Dr. Maryann Cusimano Love, CUA political science professor and

author of You are My I Love You.

***CHILDREN’S BOOK PERFORMANCE ASSIGNED***
February 16 Field Trip: Archive of American Folk Culture, American Folklife Center, Library of Congress. Dr. Todd Harvey, host.
February 23 Grimm’s Fairy Tales In-class Reading: “The Red Shoes.”

American Ballet Theater Performance Analysis Discussion

Sung and Unsung Folk Narratives Discussion

***JOURNAL DUE—MIDTERM REVIEW***

March 2 NO CLASS—SPRING RECESS
March 9 Grimm’s Fairy Tales In-class Reading: “Rapunzel.”

Joseph Campbell and The Power of Myth with Bill Moyers; Part 3: The First Storytellers: Video viewing and discussion.
March 16 Grimm’s Fairy Tales In-class Reading: “Snow-White and Rose-Red”

Estés, Women Who Run with the Wolves; Archetypes in Literature and Life Discussion: Critical analysis of a story and chapter by students.


March 23 Grimm’s Fairy Tales In-class Reading: “The Golden Bird.”

Comics Discussion—Nelson Mandela and Batman: The Dark Knight Returns


March 30 “Oral History in the African American Women’s Community”; Guest Lecturer: Margaret Jerrido, Oral Historian and Head, Urban Archives, Temple University. In-class Oral History Practicum
April 6 ***CHILDREN’S BOOK IN-CLASS PERFORMANCE***
April 13 Stories Told in Still Images: “New Orleans Then and Now--Photographic Stories.” Guest Lecturer, Tim Feresten, independent photojournalist and former faculty, Yale University, School of Architecture.

April 20 Grimm’s Fairy Tales In-class Reading: “The Water of Life.”

Narrative Structure of Moving Images—Film and Video—Discussion: Estés interpretation of “Sealskin, Soulskin” story and viewing of the video, “The Secret of Roan Inish” (1994).

April 27 Grimm’s Fairy Tales In-class Reading: “The Blue Light.”

Biography/Autobiography Lecture; In-Class Obituary Practicum



Evaluation—Stories of Lives, Lives of Stories

***PERSONAL STORY PAPER DUE***
May 4 ***KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT STORY PROJECT DUE***

By 5:00pm, in my office or mailbox









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