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Cecil County Public Schools

Division of Education Services

Weaving a Story

Plot, Conflict, and Setting

Unit 1 - Grade 7

Teacher Planning Guide

Summer 2009
This unit is the property of

Cecil County Public Schools

201 Booth Street

Elkton, MD 21921

and may not be duplicated without permission.

Acknowledgements

The development of an integrated English language arts unit is the result of the collaboration and contribution of a team of people. The grade seven Unit 1: Weaving a Story reflects the time and effort of individuals who contributed to and provided input in this endeavor. The unit was written during the summer of 2009 curriculum writing using the Maryland Literature series. Sincere appreciation is extended to those who contributed to this compilation.

Unit Development

Summer 2009
Teachers

Christine Bradley

Gretchen Brown

Nikki Longeway

Deb Paul

Kelly Reed

Julianne Sindorf

Jenn Tetreault

Dannon Wilson

Susan Zimmer

Martin Haberl

Instructional Coordinator for English Language Arts


Table of Contents

Grade 7 Unit 1: Weaving a Story

Unit Overview........................................................................ 1


Unit Scope and Sequence 2
Desired Results 3
Student Declarative and Procedural Content Knowledge 4

Academic Vocabulary and Selection Vocabulary for Word Wall 5

Essential Questions for Posting 6
Unit Questions for Posting 28
Unit Initiating Activity (Cup Stacking Challenge) 32

Daily Instructional Plans:

Lesson 1 Identifying Literary Genres Workshop and Reading Strategies Workshop

(“Seventh Grade”) 37

Lesson 2 “The Last Dog” 49

Lesson 3 “Thank You M’am” 54

Lesson 4 “Rikki-Tikki -Tavi” 60

Lesson 5 from Exploring the Titanic 69

Lesson 6 “Casey at the Bat” 76

Lesson 7 “Monsters are Due on Maple Street” 79

Lesson 8 Descriptive Essay 81


Unit 1: Weaving a Story

Unit Overview


Unit Title: Unit 1: Weaving a Story
Grade Level: 7
Key Words: Plot, Setting, and Conflict
Timeframe: Approximately 4-5 weeks
Theme:

“A well written story is like a tapestry, with colorful strands of thread woven together to make a compelling picture…The basic elements that form the foundation of a story are plot, conflict, and setting” (McDougal Littell, 2008).


Focus:

As a result of this unit of instruction, students will interpret and respond to a variety of texts, focusing on the many types and aspects of plot, conflict, and setting and, in turn, relating these to their lives.

Unit Overview:

The unit encompasses several purposes for reading and writing in order for the students to gain knowledge about the interrelationships among plot, conflict, and setting. The Voluntary State Curriculum addressed includes: stages of plot, internal/external conflict, setting, inferencing, sequencing, cause/effect, conflict, and grammar skills. Students will compose a process piece of writing in the form of a descriptive essay. The unit assessment assesses all of the VSC objectives addressed throughout the unit.

This is a model unit which is designed to show how to develop a unit that is concept-based and addresses the essential curriculum. The lessons included serve as a framwork for teaching. They should guide your lesson and allow for creativity and extension. It is essential, however, to instruct the unit as written in order to maintain the continuity of the unit’s focus. Teachers may need to modify a segment of a lesson depending on students’ needs and abilities.
Grade 7 English Language Arts Scope and Sequence
Unit 1: Plot, Conflict, and Setting --- Unit Assessment Objectives

Pre-Assessment pp 166-171 (Papa’s Parrot)


  • Identify and analyze the stages of plot (3.0.3.c)

  • Analyze and evaluate setting (3.0.3.f)

  • Identify patterns of organization (sequence and cause/effect) (2.0.3.a)

  • Make inferences (1.0.E.4.c)

  • Understand and use Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes (1.0.D.2.b)

  • Complete analogies (1.0.D.2.b)

  • Use end marks, commas and coordinating conjunctions, and semicolons to correct run-on sentences (5.0.A.2c, 5.0.C.2)

  • Correctly use apostrophes to punctuate possessives (5.0.C.2.b)

  • Maintain pronoun-antecedent agreement (5.0.B.2.b)
  • Use correct pronoun case (5.0.B.2.b)


  • Write a focused description using the writing process (4.0.1)




Selection

Literary Focus/ VSC Objectives

Writing/ Grammar

Reader’s Workshop: Parts of a Story

  • Analyze stages of plot (3.0.3.c)

  • Analyze internal and external conflict (3.0.3.c)

  • Analyze setting (3.0.3.f)




Seventh Grade

(Short Story, Easy)



  • Review using active reading strategies




The Last Dog

(Short Story, Challenging)



  • Analyze setting (3.0.3.f)

  • Analyze plot (3.0.3.c)

  • Identify sequence (2.0.3.a)

  • Correct run-on sentences (5.0.A.2.c)

Thank You, M’am

(Short Story, Easy)



  • Analyze internal and external conflict (3.0.3.f)

  • Make inferences (1.0.E.4.c)
  • Use prefixes that mean “not” (1.0.D.3.b)


  • Punctuate possessives correctly (5.0.C.2.b)

Riki-tiki-tavi

(Short Story, Average, Interactive Reader)



  • Analyze conflict (3.0.3.f)

  • Identify cause and effect (2.0.3.a)

  • Use Latin roots (uni, viv and vit) (1.0.D.3.b)

  • Use suffixes to form adjectives (1.0.D.3.b)

  • Use correct pronoun-antecedent agreement (5.0.B.2.b)

from Exploring the Titanic

(Narrative Nonfiction, Average)



  • Identify chronological order (2.0.3.a)

  • Make inferences (1.0.E.4.c)

  • Explain analogies (1.0.D.2.b)

  • Use correct pronoun case (5.0.B.2.b)

Casey at the Bat (Narrative Poem, Challenging)

  • Make inferences (1.0.E.4.c)

  • Analyze sound elements of poetry (3.0.4.c)

  • Use structural features to distinguish types of poetry (3.0.4.a)




The Monsters are Due on Maple Street

(Teleplay, Average)



  • Analyze conflict in drama (3.0.3.c)

  • Use elements of drama to gain meaning from text (3.0.5)





Write a Descriptive Essay (writing process)- Writing Workshop

pp. 158-165






  • Write a descriptive essay (4.0.2.b)

  • Use sensory details (4.0.1.c.4)

  • Revise and edit using a rubric (4.0.1.e.1)

Unit 1: Weaving a Story

Desired Results
Students will understand the following concepts:


  • Plot, Conflict, and Setting


Big Question

  • What makes a story unforgettable?

What Essential Questions will guide the unit and focus teaching/learning?





  • How do your actions affect your life?

  • How does conflict impact your life?

  • How does your setting affect your actions and feelings?

What Unit Questions will guide the unit and focus teaching/learning?




  • How are plot, setting, and conflict woven together to create an unforgettable story?

  • How does understanding the stages of plot help you to better comprehend a story?

  • How does conflict keep the action moving forward?

  • How does setting impact a character’s actions and feelings?

Unit 1: Weaving a Story

Student Content Knowledge

Declarative

Word parts

prefix


suffix

root


base word
Characteristics of literary genres

fiction


poetry

drama


nonfiction
Characteristics of text structures/organization

short stories

teleplays

narrative poetry

narrative nonfiction
Characteristics of science fiction

Sensory details

Sequence and chronological order

Stages of plot

Elements of drama

Setting
Conflict

internal conflict

external conflict


Suspense

Dialogue and dialect

Run-on sentence v. grammatically correct sentence

Pronoun cases

Analogy
Procedural

Apply reading strategies

Preview

Set a purpose

Connect

Use Prior Knowledge



Predict

Visualize


Monitor

Question


Clarify

Evaluate
Make Inferences


Sequence events

Categorize vocabulary words

Read independently

Comprehend a text

View a video clip

Discuss with small and large groups

Respond in writing

Draw a picture

Describe the setting

Analyze characterization

Classify conflicts according to type

Identify and correct run-on sentences

Identify and analyze stages of plot

Make inferences

Use apostrophes with possessives

Use correct pronoun case

Complete analogies

Identify and analyze cause-effect relationships





Unit 1: Weaving a Story


Selection and Academic Vocabulary and Selection /Word Wall


Unit 1 Selection

Essential Concept/ Skill

Vocabulary

“The Last Dog”

setting

copious

sequence

disembodied

plot

evasive

compare/contrast

foray




foresighted




languish




posterity




reproof

“Thank You M’am”

conflict

frail

internal conflict

presentable

external conflict

mistrust

make inferences

barren

dialect


“Rikki-tikki-tavi”


conflict

valiant

suspense

revive

cause-effect

cunningly

foreshadow

cower




fledgling




consolation




singe

from Exploring the Titanic

chronological order

prophecy

narrative nonfiction

ghastly

make inferences

novelty




feverishly

“Casey at the Bat”

make inferences

pallor




latter




doffed




writhing




tumult



scornful





sneer




vengeance

The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street

conflict

assent

teleplay/drama

antagonism




contorted




converging




defiant




incriminate




optimistic




revelation




cause-effect

chronological order

compare/contrast




conflict

external conflict

foreshadow


internal conflict


make inferences

narrative nonfiction




plot

sequence

setting




suspense

teleplay/drama

dialect



antagonism

assent

barren




consolation

contorted

converging




copious

cower

cunningly




defiant

disembodied

doffed





evasive

feverishly

fledgling




foray

foresighted

frail




ghastly

incriminate

languish




latter

mistrust

novelty




optimistic

pallor

posterity




presentable

posterity

presentable


prophecy


reproof

revelation




revive

scornful

singe




sneer

tumult

valiant




vengeance

writhing

How does conflict impact your life?


How does your setting affect your actions and feelings?

How do your actions affect your life?


Unit Question:

How are plot, setting, and conflict woven together to create an unforgettable story?





Unit Question:

How does understanding the stages of plot help you to better comprehend a story?



Unit Question:

How does conflict keep the action moving forward?

Unit Question:

How does setting impact a character’s actions and feelings?

Unit Initiating Activity

Cup Stacking

Challenge

This is an interactive activity aimed at problem solving. Some groups will complete the task very quickly, while other groups will need to keep trying and trying to complete the task successfully. The hardest part is not giving up when things get tough or frustrating, or more important, not cheating. Good luck and have fun!

Objective

The goal is to work together to complete a difficult task without giving up.


Group Size

Group of six is ideal, three or more is acceptable.


Teacher Materials

  • scissors

  • string or yarn

  • paper cups of equal size

  • rubber bands

  • directions


Student Materials for Each Group

  • directions for every student

  • 10 paper cups of equal size

  • one rubber band large enough to fit around the paper cup

  • six pieces of string (2 - 3 feet long each)

Resources/Materials



  • 1 pair of scissors

  • 10 paper cups of equal size one set per group

  • 1 rubber band that fits around the cup one per group

  • 6 pieces of string/yarn cut into 2 - 3 feet pieces one set per group

  • Cup stack activity one per student

  • Student directions one per student

  • Discussion questions one per student

  • Essential Questions



Activities

Whole Group

1. With no introduction to the concept of unforgettable stories or that the class is beginning a unit on plot, setting, and conflict, tell students that today they will be working on a problem-solving activity.


2. Tell students that each person will receive a set of directions that will explain the entire activity.
3. Divide class into groups of 6 as nearly as possible.

Small Group

4. Distribute Cup Stack Activity and Student Directions to students. Have students discuss and determine the main purpose of the directions.

5. Tell students that they are not permitted to ask questions of the teacher and must rely on the members of their team to solve any problems they may encounter. They also may not talk to other groups.
6. Distribute materials to each group. Instruct students to begin the activity and monitor groups.
7. Allow approximately 15 minutes for completion of the task. Some groups may not complete the task. When the time is up, distribute Discussion Questions to every student. Instruct students to read each question and record notes for discussion. Each member of the group should participate in the discussion and write notes that will help him/her participate in the whole class discussion that will follow. Allow time to complete group discussion.
Whole Group

8. Conduct a whole class discussion based on the student’s responses. Refer to the Teacher Tips- Discussion Questions resource.


9. Introduce the students to the Unit Essential Questions for the unit by posting them. Discuss each question and tell students they will be the “lens” through which they read each selection.
Closure

10. Elicit from the students what they learned from today’s activity.


Cup Stack Activity

Student Directions

1. Your group is to tie each piece of string to the rubber band as evenly spaced as possible so you finish with a rubber band with six pieces of string attached to it looking like sunshine with six sun rays going out in all directions. Each group should have one of these.


2. Place the paper cups on a desk or table, spread out and upside down.

3. The group is now to build a pyramid out of the paper cups (4 on the bottom, 3 on the next row, then 2, and finally 1 on the top).

4. Group members may not touch the cups with their hands or any other part of their bodies, even if a cup falls to the floor.
5. Each person should hold onto one of the strings that is attached to the rubber band and the group then uses this device to pick up the cups and place them on top of each other to build the pyramid. This is done by pulling the rubber band apart and then bringing it back together over the cup. If there are less than six people on any given team, some team members may have to hold more than one string.
6. Build your pyramid remembering that you may not touch the cups with your hand or any part of your body for the entire task.


Discussion Questions

DIRECTIONS: Discuss and answer these questions as a group. Be prepared to share your responses with the class.

1. List the steps you took to complete the task.

2. At what point in the activity did your group figure out how to stack the cups successfully?

3. What conflicts or challenges did your group face during the activity?


  1. Was a leader obvious in your group? Did the group choose a leader or did this person just seem to take charge? Did everyone listen to this person?


  1. Could your group have been successful if any person did not actively participate in the task? Why was the group more successful than an individual would have been?


  1. What would you do differently next time?



Teacher Tips- Discussion Questions


  1. For this question, students should list the events that happened in their group from beginning to end. Make a connection to the events in a plot.



  1. After discussing student responses to this question, make the connection to the climax in the story. You could also discuss what the students may know about a plot diagram and its parts.





  1. You can briefly discuss the concept of conflict in a story with students. Try to connect the idea that conflict makes a story interesting and that characters must work through the conflict in order to meet success.




  1. After this discussion, talk about how different characters tends to shape a story. If you wanted, you could choose to discuss flat and round characters here.




  1. When discussing this question, along with discussing how if there were changes to the group, the activity would be different, also discuss if there were changes to the setting, how would that affect the outcome of the activity? For instance, if some students were put in a dark room to complete the activity, how would that alter the group’s ability to complete the task? If some groups were put outside, what would that do? If some groups were put into a small section of the room, how would that affect the group? Try to make the connection between this question and setting.




  1. Allow the students to share their ideas with you.

Unit 1: Weaving a Story

Lesson 1: Identifying Genres and Reading Strategies Workshops

Seventh Grade”


Time Frame: 3 classes

Difficulty: Easy

Readability: Lexile 730, Fry 7, Dale – Chall 6.5
Objectives:

  • 1.0.1 Identify literary genres
  • 1.0.3 Identify and apply reading strategies


  • 3.0.3c Analyze plot

  • 4.0.2a.5 Identify sensory details


Selection Materials:

  • Identifying Genres and Reading Strategies pp. 2-15 Literature

  • “Seventh Grade” by Gary Soto pp. 32-38 Literature

  • Additional Student Textbooks (for center activity)

  • “Genres of Literature” PowerPoint*

  • Notetaking Worksheet For Literary Genres and Note Taking and Teacher Key - 1 Per Student (Resource 1-1 and 1A)

  • Reading Strategies Powerpoint*

  • Word Sort Cards – Class Set (Resource 1-2)

  • Reading Strategies Pre-Assessment Worksheet (Resource 1-3)

  • Plot Diagram Pre-Assessment Worksheet (Resource 1-4)

  • Reading Strategies Bookmark Worksheet (Resource 1-5)

  • Sensory Detail Notes Worksheet (Resource 1-6)

  • MediaSmart DVD

  • Presenter

*These items are found on the CCPS website.


Assessments:

Assessment

Grading Tool

Type

Sensory Detail Notes Worksheet

(Resource 1-6)



N/A

Formative

Day 1:

***IMPORTANT*** The detailed lessons for this day are embedded into the notes section of each PowerPoint slide. YOU MUST view the entire slide show before beginning this lesson. You may view these notes during class presentation by going to the “View” menu and clicking on “Presenter Tools.” The slide show will be shown to students, but you will be able to view the notes at the same time on your computer. Make sure you have textbooks assigned to each student before beginning this lesson.
Day 1:


  • Set up stations for Genres PowerPoint (check notes under slide 2 for directions)

  • “Genres of Literature PowerPoint (and presenter)

  • Notetaking Worksheet For Literary Genres – 1 per student

  • Student Textbooks

  • Note Paper


Warm Up: (5-10 min.)

Teacher’s Choice


Activities: (60 min.)

  • Complete slide show with class. Make sure to stop at given times, complete stations, and complete the Notetaking Worksheet for Literary Genres (Resource 1-1) when indicated.

Closure: (5 min.)

OPTIONAL: MediaSmart DVD activity listed on PowerPoint.

Day 2:

***IMPORTANT*** The detailed lessons for this day are embedded into the notes section of each slide. YOU MUST view the entire slide show before beginning this lesson. You may view these notes during class presentation by going to the “View” menu and clicking on “Presenter Tools”. The slide show will be shown to students, but you will be able to view the notes at the same time on your computer. Make sure you have textbooks assigned to each student before beginning this lesson.

Materials:


  • Reading Strategies PowerPoint

  • Warm-up: Day 2 Word Sort Cards (Resource 1-2)

  • Student Textbooks (“Seventh Grade” pp. 32-38)

  • Reading Strategies Pre-Assessment Worksheet (Resource 1-3)


Warm Up: (10 min.)

(Resource 1-2) Use given word sort cards to have students review previous genre lesson. They will sort the cards (specific types of literature in genres) into their correct genre types. Ex. “Novella” would be sorted into the “Fiction” group.


Activities: (25-30 min.)

  • Complete slide show with class. Make sure to stop at given points and complete activities.


Before Reading: (5 min.)

  • Hand out Reading Strategies Pre-Assessment Worksheet (Appendix 1-3) Explain that they will be reading a short story and they are to use given stops in selection to fill in one of the reading strategies on the worksheet. They must try to use ALL strategies. This is a pre-assessment and will NOT be graded. However, you will collect it to determine which strategies to focus on the most for the next lesson. Recommendation for this short story is to read it aloud together in order to stop at pre-determined areas to allow for reading strategy use (fill in worksheet).
  • Also let students know that after reading the short story, they will be completing a plot diagram on their own. They should be paying attention to the important events that occur in the plot as they read.



During Reading: (30 min.)

  • Begin reading the story “Seventh Grade” on page 32.

  • Read the story and stop on the following pages/lines to have students complete one reading strategy on their worksheet:

    • page 32, line 15.

    • page 34, line 17

    • page 34, line 32

    • page 35, line 58


Closure: (5 min.)

Ask students to respond to the question: What reading strategy was the easiest for you to use so far? Hardest?


Day 3:
Materials:

  • Student Textbooks

  • Plot Diagram Pre-Assessment worksheet (Resource 1-4)

  • Reading Strategies Bookmark worksheet (Resource 1-5)

  • Sensory Detail Notes worksheet (Resource 1-6)

Warm Up: (10 min.)

Journal Prompt: Out of all the literary genres we learned this week, what is your favorite genre to read and why? Least favorite genre and why?

Activities:

During Reading: (35 min.)


  • Continue reading the story “Seventh Grade” (left off on page 35, line 58). Stop on the following pages/lines to have students complete one reading strategy on their worksheet:

    • page 35, line 86

    • page 36, line 110

    • page 37, line 129


    • page 38, end of story (line 182)


After Reading: (25 min.)

      • Hand out Plot Diagram pre-assessment worksheet (Resource 1-4).

      • Have students fill in the boxes independently with the appropriate plot element labels. (ex. climax, rising action)

      • Have students get into pairs or groups of 3. They will look back in the story together and determine the important events that should be plotted onto the plot diagram. Have the students put them in the correct place and order along the plot diagram line.

      • When finished, have students turn to page 26 in the textbook. Discuss the correct stages of plot and a few of the events from the story including where they would occur.

      • Hand out Reading Strategies Bookmark Worksheet (Resource 1-5). Discuss the strategies that students struggled with to correct/enhance understanding. Briefly go through other strategies.

      • Introduce Unit Writing Prompt 2 on page 158. Explain that students will be given time during the unit to practice finding sensory detail examples from each selection to help them with the writing prompt. Also, tell them they will be given time at the end of the unit to complete a writing piece for the prompt.

      • Hand out and discuss Sensory Detail Notes worksheet (Resource 1-6).


Closure: (10 min.)

  • Discuss and fill in examples of sensory details that they found in the story “Seventh Grade.”




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