Changing Camilla 0) Materials



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Changing Camilla (8.0)

Materials:

Copy of A Bad Case of Stripes by David Shannon

 Copies of Bloom’s Taxonomy sheets (terms, definitions) one for each student

 Pencils

 Envelopes with sentences for each category of Bloom’s Taxonomy one per pair

of students.

 Overhead copy of sentences in correct categories
Description:

Bloom’s Taxonomy, developed in 1956 by educational psychologist Benjamin Bloom, has stood the test of time. Recently Anderson and Krathwohl (2001) have proposed some minor changes to include renaming and reordering of the taxonomy. Regardless of which version a teacher chooses to use, classrooms should include higher order questions to develop students’ cognitive abilities. Students can also be taught the levels of questions to help them in their thought processes in all the content areas. This activity helps students think through the six levels of the taxonomy as they read a piece of literature.

Step-by-Step:

1. Tell participants that a good way of introducing a piece of literature to students for a read aloud or shared reading is to relate it to their prior knowledge. A Bad Case of Stripes could be introduced by talking about what it means for a student to try to “fit in” with a particular group.

2. Read the book A Bad Case of Stripes by David Shannon to the group.

3. Ask participants to write three questions about the book A Bad Case of Stripes that they might ask their students.

4. Give them a copy of the revised Bloom’s categories and ask them to decide which category their questions should fit under. Have them pair with another person to share their questions and categories.

5. Next give them a copy of the revised Bloom’s categories that have a definition and verbs for each category. Do they still agree with their placement?

6. Give each pair an envelope of questions to sort under the correct categories on the Bloom’s chart.

7. On an overhead, place the correct classification of the questions in the envelopes for students to check. Do they agree with this grouping? Lead a discussion of the revised categories.

8. To close, ask how participants to share how they might use this activity or Bloom’s Taxonomy in their classrooms. Does this help them to focus on the three higher levels?


CONTENT STANDARD 8.0 LITERATURE
Grade Level Expectations


  • GLE 0401.8.1 Use active comprehension strategies to derive meaning while reading and check for understanding after reading.


State Performance Indicators

• SPI 0401.8.2 Identify characters, setting, and plot in a passage.

• SPI 0401.8.3 Determine the problem in a story and recognize its solution.


Materials needed:

• Copy of the book A Bad Case of Stripes by David Shannon.

• Copies of Bloom’s Taxonomy sheets (terms, definitions) one for each student

• pencils

• One envelope for each pair of students containing question strips about the

book A Bad Case of Stripes (strips could be color coded by category)

• Overhead copy of sentences in correct categories for Bloom’s Taxonomy


Assessment Activity Title: Changing Camilla


Description of Activity:

  1. Set up activity by discussing what it means to “fit in” with a group.

  2. Read the book Stripes by David Shannon to the class.

  3. Ask students to write three questions about the book that they might ask their classmates.
  4. Give them a copy of the revised Bloom’s categories. Discuss what they think each one means. Next ask them to decide which category their questions should fit under. Have them pair with another student to share their questions and categories.


  5. Give students a copy of the revised Bloom’s categories that have a definition for each category. Do they still agree with the placement of their questions?

  6. Give each pair an envelope of questions to sort under the correct categories on the Bloom chart.

  7. Place on the overhead the correct classification for students to check and discuss.


Assignment Extensions:

Using Bloom’s Taxonomy, have students write a set of questions for a

favorite fairy tale or book.



A Bad Case of
Stripes Activity

Changing Camilla”



Bloom’s Terms

REMEMBER (Knowledge):

UNDERSTAND (Comprehension):

APPLY:
ANALYZE:

EVALUATE:
CREATE (Synthesis):

BLOOM’S TAXONOMY

REMEMBER (Knowledge): Recall or recognition of specific information.

(Verbs--choose, describe, define, identify, label, list, locate, match, memorize, name, omit, recite, recognize, select, state)


UNDERSTAND (Comprehension): Understanding of given information.

(Verbs—classify, defend, demonstrate, distinguish, explain, express, extend, give example, illustrate, indicate, interrelate, interpret, infer, judge, match, paraphrase, represent, restate, rewrite, select, shoe, summarize, tell, translate)


APPLY: Using strategies, concepts, principles, and theories in new situations.

(Verbs—apply, choose, dramatize, explain, generalize, judge, organize, paint, prepare, produce, select, show, sketch, solve, use)

ANALYZE: Breaking information down into its component elements.

(Verbs—analyze, categorize, classify, compare, differentiate, distinguish, identify, infer, point out, select, subdivide, survey)

EVALUATION: Judging the value of ideas, materials, and methods by developing and applying standards and criteria.

(Verbs—appraise, judge, criticize, defend, compare)


CREATE (Synthesis): Putting together ideas or elements to develop an original idea or engage in creative thinking.

(Verbs—choose, combine, compose, construct, create, design, develop, do, formulate, hypothesize, invent, make, make up, originate, organize, plan, role play, tell)



Changing Camilla

Note: Prior to lesson, teacher should cut questions into strips and place in envelopes. (One set for each group of two)


REMEMBER (Knowledge):

1. Who is Camilla Cream?

2. What did Camilla like to eat that her friends did not?

3. What happened that made Camilla’s stripes go away?


UNDERSTAND (Comprehension):

1. Explain why did Camilla stopped eating lima beans?

2. What would have happened if the principal had not phoned Camilla’s mother?

3. What would happen in the neighborhood when the reporters appeared outside

of the Cream’s home?
APPLY:

1. If you were Camilla’s friend, how might you have helped her?

2. Pretend that you are Camilla. Tell how you felt when you took the medicine

and turned into a giant pill.

3. If you were Camilla, how would you treat others that are different from you?
ANALYZE:

1. Identify some of Camilla’s worries.

2. Choose two characters from the book A Bad Case of Stripes and compare the

way they handle Camilla’s problem.

3. If you were Camilla, how might you try to make your friends understand what it

feels like to not fit in with others?

EVALUATE:

1. Why, do you think, Camilla decided it was okay to eat lima beans? Defend

your answer.

2. Which is more important to give up things you like in order to fit in with the

crowd or to be true to yourself? Why or why not?

3. Did you like this story? Why or why not?


CREATE (Synthesis):

1. If everyone had thought Camilla’s condition was “cool”, how might the story

have been different?

2. What might have happened to Camilla if the old woman had not cured her?



3. Create a new name for Camilla as her body changes into each different

design. Explain why you chose that name.




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