Chapter 3 narrative form multiple-Choice Questions

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CHAPTER 3 NARRATIVE FORM


CHAPTER 3

NARRATIVE FORM

Multiple-Choice Questions
1. In a narrative film, an element is nondiegetic if it

a. does not contribute to the cause-effect flow of the events.

b. is off-screen rather than on-screen.

c. is not part of the world of the depicted narrative.

d. is not directly presented in the plot but can be inferred.

Answer: c

Bloom’s level: Understand
2. As defined by Film Art, a film’s “plot” is

a. everything visually and audibly present in the film.

b. the most important causal line of action.

c. the events as viewers mentally reconstruct them.

d. a brief summary of the film’s action.

Answer: a

Bloom’s level: Remember
3. The opening scene of Pulp Fiction is an example of

a. expansion of temporal duration.

b. a manipulation of temporal order.

c. an imbedded narrative.

d. unrestricted narration.

Answer: b

Bloom’s level: Apply
4. Christopher Nolan created a unique manipulation of time in his film Memento by structuring the story in which of the following ways?

a. in three alternate cause-and-effect situations

b. in reverse chronological order

c. in random order

d. through five separate character perspectives

Answer: b

Bloom’s level: Remember

5. “Depth” of narration refers to

a. how quickly story information is provided to the audience.

b. how many lines of action the plot weaves together.

c. how much information is presented by a nondiegetic narrator.

d. how much the spectator learns about the characters’ psychological states.

Answer: d

Bloom’s level: Remember

6. Which of the following statements is NOT true of the narration of George Miller’s The Road Warrior?

a. The narration is mainly restricted to the hero Max’s range of knowledge.

b. The narration provides shots from Max’s optical point of view, as well as mental subjectivity.

c. The mysterious narrator’s voice from the opening scene turns out to be that of Max as an old man.

d. The narration withholds information to create a surprise ending.

Answer: c

Bloom’s level: Remember
7. The chains of actions that make up the narratives of classical Hollywood films typically depend on

a. psychological causes.

b. social causes.

c. natural causes.

d. restricted causes.

Answer: a

Bloom’s level: Remember
8. Which of the following genres does NOT provide conventions used in Citizen Kane?

a. the musical

b. the detective story

c. the newspaper story

d. the Western

Answer: d

Bloom’s level: Remember
9. In Citizen Kane, the event that causes the reporter Thompson to write a story on Kane is Kane’s

a. second divorce.

b. inheritance of a mine.

c. death.

d. first divorce.

Answer: c

Bloom’s level: Remember
10. Film Art
’s segmentation of Citizen Kane shows that its narrative is built around

a. a brief story duration.

b. a series of lengthy flashbacks.

c. the reporter Thompson’s interviews with Kane.

d. Kane’s series of successful political campaigns.

Answer: b

Bloom’s level: Apply

11. The newsreel sequence in Citizen Kane

a. provides the only presentation of the events in Kane’s life in chronological order.

b. presents a brief version of narrative events in roughly the same order as in the film as a whole.

c. summarizes events spectators have already seen in flashback and provides a crucial clue to the narrative’s resolution.

d. finally gives the spectator an explanation of Kane’s mysterious final word, “Rosebud.”

Answer: b

Bloom’s level: Analyze

12. The ending of Citizen Kane is notable for

a. leaving the central mystery of the story partially open.

b. thoroughly resolving an unusually large number of plot lines.

c. suddenly introducing a newsreel that summarizes and clarifies the narrative causality.

d. daringly presenting unmotivated causes that finally allow Thompson to achieve his goal.

Answer: a

Bloom’s level: Remember
13. Ambiguity in Citizen Kane arises in part from

a. the reporter Thompson’s concealment of what he learns about Kane’s past.

b. the refusal of important characters to cooperate with Thompson.

c. the lack of clarity of some of the characters’ motivations.

d. a small number of crucial lies told by the characters to Thompson.

Answer: c

Bloom’s level: Understand
14. Film Art argues that the search for the meaning of “Rosebud” in Citizen Kane is more than a gimmick because

a. Thompson’s discovery of “Rosebud” is what permits the narrative to achieve complete closure.

b. the “Rosebud” motif creates parallelisms among all the flashbacks.

c. the search provides a cause that motivates an investigation into character traits.

d. “Rosebud” provides vital motivation about why Kane’s mother sent him to live with Thatcher.

Answer: c

Bloom’s level: Understand
15. Citizen Kane creates a narrative parallel between Kane’s political campaign and

a. his attempt to promote Bernstein despite Thatcher’s objections.

b. the montage sequence of Kane’s first marriage deteriorating.

c. his attempt to make Leland into a famous drama critic.

d. his attempt to foster Susan’s operatic career.

Answer: d

Bloom’s level: Understand

16. Which of the following statements is NOT true of the narration in Citizen Kane?

a. The multiple flashbacks narrated by different characters yield restricted, generally objective information about Kane.

b. For much of the film, the information presented by the narration is largely limited in range to the reporter Thompson’s knowledge.

c. At the beginning and ending of the film, the narration moves outside the range of knowledge of any of the characters.

d. The flashbacks are used both to reveal and to conceal story information.

Answer: b

Bloom’s level: Understand

17. What is the term for a chain of events linked by cause and effect and occurring in time and space?

a. narrative

b. plot

c. causality



d. parallelism

Answer: a

Bloom’s level: Remember
18. In a narrative, the sum total of all events in chronological order is the

a. plot.


b. range.

c. story.

d. outcome.

Answer: c

Bloom’s level: Remember
19. A “point-of-view shot” is taken from

a. the filmmaker’s optical standpoint.

b. a character’s optical standpoint.

c. a remote location.

d. a point above the action.

Answer: b

Bloom’s level: Remember
20. Which of the following is NOT an example of a way in which mental subjectivity might be portrayed in a film?

a. an internal voice that reports a character’s thoughts

b. images of a character’s memories

c. the use of slow motion to suggest hallucination

d. dialogue between characters

Answer: d

Bloom’s level: Understand
21. “Restricted” narration is commonly used in

a. mystery films.

b. documentaries.

c. classical films.

d. biographical films.

Answer: a

Bloom’s level: Understand
22. Classical filmmakers prefer that the end of a film

a. set up the possibility for a sequel.

b. bring closure.

c. leave some degree of mystery.

d. pose a question to spectators.

Answer: b

Bloom’s level: Remember
23. The agent who tells the story in a film is called the

a. protagonist.

b. commentator.

c. antagonist.

d. narrator.

Answer: d

Bloom’s level: Remember

24. The process of narration involves

a. presenting story information in chronological order.

b. providing information that spectators would not otherwise have.

c. distributing story information to achieve specific effects.

d. interpreting events and actions for spectators.

Answer: c

Bloom’s level: Understand

25. In a film, the high point of the action that increases tension for the spectator is called the

a. climax.

b. resolution.

c. closing.

d. conflict.

Answer: a

Bloom’s level: Remember
26. “Setup” refers to

a. preparation for shooting.

b. the first quarter of a film’s plot.

c. the buildup just before the climax.

d. a plot twist.

Answer: b

Bloom’s level: Remember
27. Action that takes place before the plot begins is called the

a. exposition.

b. setup.

c. opening.

d. backstory.

Answer: d

Bloom’s level: Remember
28. At what point in a film does most of the exposition usually take place?

a. just before the climax

b. during the resolution

c. near the beginning

d. immediately following the climax

Answer: c

Bloom’s level: Remember
29. A complex character typically

a. possesses several varying traits.

b. faces multiple conflicts.

c. has difficulty making decisions.

d. overcomes obstacles.

Answer: a

Bloom’s level: Remember
30. What is the term for how often a story event is presented in a plot?

a. parallelism

b. repetition

c. frequency

d. exposition

Answer: c

Bloom’s level: Remember
True-False Questions
31. Narrative form can be used in documentary films.

Answer: True

Bloom’s level: Remember
32. The opening scene of North by Northwest contains no nondiegetic elements.

Answer: False

Bloom’s level: Apply
33. Howard Hawks’s The Big Sleep is an example of objective, highly restricted narration.

Answer: True

Bloom’s level: Remember

34. In a narrative film, plot duration is always equal to story duration.

Answer: False

Bloom’s level: Understand

35. A point-of-view shot is an example of perceptual subjectivity in narration.

Answer: True

Bloom’s level: Understand
36. Plots based on searches might be considered examples of goal-oriented plots.

Answer: True

Bloom’s level: Remember
37. Films such as Run, Lola, Run by Tom Tykwer and Peter Howitt’s Sliding Door distort story time by providing alternative futures to the viewer.

Answer: True

Bloom’s level: Remember
38. Alfred Hitchcock’s approach to narration is to withhold as much information as possible from the spectator in order to create surprise.

Answer: False

Bloom’s level: Remember

39. The plot duration of Citizen Kane consists of roughly 65 years of Kane’s life plus the length of Thompson’s investigation.

Answer: True

Bloom’s level: Remember


40. In Citizen Kane, the pattern of plot development is to move from flashbacks of Kane as an old man progressively back to flashbacks of him as a child.

Answer: False

Bloom’s level: Remember
41. Non-character narrators are common in documentaries.

Answer: True

Bloom’s level: Remember
42. A classical narrative usually involves a blocking element, or an opposition that creates conflict for the protagonist.

Answer: True

Bloom’s level: Remember
43. In classical films, characters rarely achieve their goals through changing their situations or attitudes.

Answer: False

Bloom’s level: Remember
44. A common pattern of plot development involves a character gaining knowledge as the film progresses.

Answer: True

Bloom’s level: Remember
45. The onset of the conflict is the part of the plot that introduces the backstory and initial situation.

Answer: False

Bloom’s level: Remember

46. Characters are the most common source of causes in a narrative.

Answer: True

Bloom’s level: Remember

47. Groundhog Day is an example of a film with a “what-if” plot.

Answer: True

Bloom’s level: Remember
48. The locale of the plot is always the same as that of the story action.

Answer: False

Bloom’s level: Remember
49. An “omniscient” narrator usually has very little information about plot and characters.

Answer: False

Bloom’s level: Remember
Essay Questions
50. Explain the distinction made in Film Art between “plot” and “story” in narrative films. Use specific examples from Film Art, the lecture, and [title of film shown in class].

Answer: Answers will vary

Bloom’s level: Understand
51. Discuss some of the ways in which a spectator actively participates in understanding the narrative of a film. Give specific examples from Film Art, the lecture, and any of the narrative films shown for this course.

Answer: Answers will vary

Bloom’s level: Apply
52. Explain why it is often useful to compare the opening and closing of a film in analyzing its narrative. Give some specific examples from Film Art, the lecture, and any of the narrative films shown for this course.

Answer: Answers will vary

Bloom’s level: Analyze
53. Explain the term narration, making reference in the course of your discussion to the concepts of range and depth. Use specific examples from Film Art, the lecture, and any of the narrative films shown for this course.

Answer: Answers will vary

Bloom’s level: Understand
54. Discuss how causality operates in two or three scenes from [title of film shown in class]. Be sure to describe how specific events motivate other events.

Answer: Answers will vary

Bloom’s level: Apply

55. Define the terms order, duration, and frequency as they apply to narrative time. Give specific examples of each from Film Art, the lecture, and any of the narrative films shown for this course.

Answer: Answers will vary

Bloom’s level: Understand

56. Describe at least two basic narrative traits of the classical Hollywood cinema, and give examples of each from Film Art, the lecture, and films shown in class.

Answer: Answers will vary

Bloom’s level: Understand
57. [The following question can be used if you show your class a film that presents a distinct alternative to the classical Hollywood cinema.] Describe two significant ways in which the narrative of [film title] departs from the classical Hollywood cinema’s tradition. Be as specific as possible in giving examples from the film.

Answer: Answers will vary

Bloom’s level: Analyze
58. Discuss at least two ways in which Citizen Kane’s narrative adheres to conventions of classical Hollywood narrative and some of the ways in which it departs from that tradition.

Answer: Answers will vary

Bloom’s level: Understand
59. Discuss at least two ways in which Citizen Kane’s plot differs from its underlying story. Be as specific as you can in giving examples of manipulations of temporal order, duration, and frequency.

Answer: Answers will vary

Bloom’s level: Analyze
60. Explain how Citizen Kane’s narrative fails to achieve complete closure and discuss some of the effects this has on the spectator’s understanding of the film.

Answer: Answers will vary

Bloom’s level: Evaluate


TB-3 |

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