Chapter 4 the shot: mise-en-scene multiple-Choice Questions



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CHAPTER 4 THE SHOT: MISE-EN-SCENE


CHAPTER 4

THE SHOT: MISE-EN-SCENE

Multiple-Choice Questions
1. Which of the following is NOT considered part of a shot’s mise-en-scene?

a. the actors’ movements

b. the camera’s angle on the action

c. objects visible in the distance

d. the shadows

Answer: b

Bloom’s level: Understand
2. A major example of a nonrealistic and expressionistic set design is

a. Greed.

b. Intolerance.

c. The Spider’s Stratagem.

d. The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.

Answer: d

Bloom’s level: Apply
3. The system of lighting widely used in classical Hollywood filmmaking is known as

a. three-point lighting.

b. five-point lighting.

c. cast-shadow lighting.

d. omnidirectional lighting.

Answer: a

Bloom’s level: Remember
4. Which of the following is NOT a term for a type of directional lighting?

a. top lighting

b. underlighting

c. overlighting

d. backlighting

Answer: c

Bloom’s level: Remember
5. Which of the following is NOT a type of lighting in the three-point lighting system?

a. rack light

b. backlight

c. key light

d. fill light

Answer: a

Bloom’s level: Remember
6. According to Film Art, a film actor’s performance style is most affected by

a. the microphone placement.

b. the camera distance.

c. the aspect ratio.

d. the lighting.

Answer: b

Bloom’s level: Understand

7. “Frontality” of staging means that

a. a character is placed in the extreme foreground of the shot.

b. a character is facing toward the camera.

c. one character blocks spectators’ views of another character.

d. a character is moving toward the foreground.

Answer: b

Bloom’s level: Remember

8. Which of the following is NOT a motif in the mise-en-scene in Buster Keaton’s Our Hospitality?

a. a sampler embroidered “Love Thy Neighbor”

b. a fish-on-a-line motif

c. a gun rack

d. a dog-on-a-leash motif

Answer: d

Bloom’s level: Remember
9. Georges Méliès was

a. an early director of fantasy films.

b. an important French set designer of the 1930s.

c. the director of Our Hospitality.

d. the first historian to study mise-en-scene in the cinema.

Answer: a

Bloom’s level: Remember
10. Stop-action involves

a. having actors stand in the same spot where they were at the end of one shot while the lighting is adjusted for the next shot.

b. halting the filming in one set and moving on to another while shooting out of continuity.

c. one actor in a scene refraining from any obvious movement after delivering a line so as not to call attention away from the actor who is responding.

d. animating an object by changing its position between each frame shot.

Answer: d

Bloom’s level: Remember
11. Aerial perspective suggests depth by

a. making more distant planes seem hazier than closer ones.

b. creating a high angle that makes parallel lines meet at the horizon.

c. composing a shot that makes the sky dominate the image.

d. filming from directly above a character or a setting.

Answer: a

Bloom’s level: Remember

12. Perspective diminution suggests depth by

a. making parallel lines seem to intersect.

b. creating false perspective by placing taller characters closer to the camera and shorter characters farther off.

c. implying that the elements which are smaller in the shot tend to be farther away.

d. reducing the cues for perspective so that the space appears relatively shallow.

Answer: c

Bloom’s level: Remember

13. Film scholars use the term mise-en-scene to describe the director’s control over

a. where the film will be shot.

b. what appears in the film frame.

c. what actors will appear in the film.

d. how long shooting will last.

Answer: b

Bloom’s level: Remember
14. In a film, a “highlight” refers to

a. a significant scene that may become part of a movie trailer.

b. acting that exceeds the director’s expectations.

c. the climax of the story developed in the film.

d. lighting that produces a patch of brightness on a surface.

Answer: d

Bloom’s level: Remember
15. A “prop” is an object in the setting that

a. has a function in the action of the film.

b. helps the actors remember their lines.

c. supports large pieces of scenery.

d. serves as a filler to make a set look complete.

Answer: a

Bloom’s level: Remember
16. Frontal lighting has a tendency to

a. create shadows.

b. distort images.

c. eliminate shadows.

d. sculpt a character’s features.

Answer: c

Bloom’s level: Understand
17. The aspect of lighting that refers to the relative intensity of illumination is called

a. density.

b. quality.

c. direction.

d. color.

Answer: b

Bloom’s level: Remember
18. When filmmakers choose to control lighting, they typically use

a. different colors of lighting.

b. a soft, yellow, incandescent light.

c. natural sources of lighting.

d. a light that is as purely white as possible.

Answer: d

Bloom’s level: Remember

19. In a film, when actors engage in conversation, they usually

a. look directly at each other and seldom blink.

b. glance away often as they gather their thoughts.

c. blink frequently to show that they are interested in the conversation.

d. focus their gaze directly at the camera.

Answer: a

Bloom’s level: Remember

20. In classical Hollywood, an actor who was typecast

a. typically played similar characters in different films.

b. was directed to avoid portraying a specific stereotype.

c. was directed to conform to audiences’ expectations.

d. usually represented a social class or historical movement.

Answer: c

Bloom’s level: Remember
21. “Performance capture” focuses on filming

a. the whole body.

b. the face.

c. background images.

d. unexpected events.

Answer: b

Bloom’s level: Remember
22. The easiest way for a filmmaker to achieve compositional balance is to

a. focus on figures on the right or the left.

b. make the shot as wide as possible.

c. center the frame on the human body.

d. counterweight two or more elements.

Answer: c

Bloom’s level: Remember
23. Which of the following is NOT a way in which a film suggests volume in a space?

a. planes

b. shape

c. shading

d. movement

Answer: a

Bloom’s level: Remember
24. Depth cues that create the illusion of depth requiring input from only one eye are

a. monochromatic.

b. monotone.

c. monolithic.

d. monocular.

Answer: d

Bloom’s level: Remember
25. In shallow-space composition, the closest and most distant planes appear

a. blurred.

b. only slightly separated.

c. significantly separated.

d. indistinguishable.

Answer: b

Bloom’s level: Remember

26. Which statement about film acting is TRUE?

a. Unlike stage actors, film actors must usually overplay their roles.

b. Film actors typically act in a more restrained manner than stage actors.

c. Film actors must adjust their movements based on camera distance.

d. Film actors are less concerned with facial expressions than stage actors.

Answer: c

Bloom’s level: Understand

27. Which of the following is NOT a term used to describe how far away from the camera a plane is?

a. near ground

b. foreground

c. background

d. middle ground

Answer: a

Bloom’s level: Remember
28. Movement is an important depth cue because it suggests

a. size diminution.

b. balance of composition.

c. aerial perspective.

d. both volumes and planes.

Answer: d

Bloom’s level: Understand
29. When a filmmaker employs a limited palette, he or she uses

a. a simple setting with few props.

b. only a few colors in the same range.

c. a small cast of actors.

d. only one or two camera angles.

Answer: b

Bloom’s level: Remember
30. The term key light refers to

a. subdued lighting.

b. background lighting.

c. the primary light source.

d. a natural light source.

Answer: c

Bloom’s level: Remember
True-False Questions
31. The two most basic types of light in a scene are the key and the rim.

Answer: False

Bloom’s level: Remember
32. Georges Méliès’s “Star-Film” studio was designed to give him control over every aspect of mise-en-scene.

Answer: True

Bloom’s level: Remember
33. Animated films, like live-action films, have mise-en-scene.

Answer: True

Bloom’s level: Understand
34. Unplanned events that are filmed by accident are not part of the mise-en-scene of a shot.

Answer: False

Bloom’s level: Understand
35. Marlon Brando’s performance in On the Waterfront was considered a major example of realistic acting in its day.

Answer: True

Bloom’s level: Remember
36. Films shot in the studio have mise-en-scene, whereas films made entirely on location do not.

Answer: False

Bloom’s level: Understand

37. “Fill” light is used to create deep shadows.

Answer: False

Bloom’s level: Remember

38. “Edge” lighting is a type of backlighting used to make characters stand out against a background.

Answer: True

Bloom’s level: Remember
39. In Hollywood studio filmmaking, the lights are kept in the same position throughout a scene, no matter where the camera is placed.

Answer: False

Bloom’s level: Remember
40. “High-key” lighting is typical of Hollywood filmmaking.

Answer: True

Bloom’s level: Remember
41. Soft, high-key lighting is associated with mystery stories, crime films, and films noir.

Answer: False

Bloom’s level: Remember
42. According to Film Art, realism is the most useful standard for evaluating actors’ performances.

Answer: False

Bloom’s level: Understand
43. Since the advent of sound, it is less important for actors to use their eyes, brow, and mouth to express character emotions.

Answer: False

Bloom’s level: Understand
44. German Expressionist films, such as The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, are characterized by realistic mise-en-scene and subtle, psychologically based acting.

Answer: False

Bloom’s level: Understand
45. “Warm” colors tend to attract the spectator’s eye more than “cool” colors.

Answer: True

Bloom’s level: Remember
46. When balancing the shot, filmmakers assume that the viewer will concentrate on the lower half of the projected frame.

Answer: False

Bloom’s level: Remember
47. Most of the gags in Our Hospitality depend on shallow-space compositions.

Answer: False

Bloom’s level: Remember
48. Setting plays a less significant role in the cinema than it does in the theater.

Answer: False

Bloom’s level: Remember

49. In modern cinema, makeup is usually applied in such a way that it will not be noticed.

Answer: True

Bloom’s level: Remember

50. “Hard” lighting reveals well-defined shadows and crisp textures.

Answer: True

Bloom’s level: Remember
Essay Questions
51. Describe and discuss the functions of the mise-en-scene in the shot or shots. Mention at least one example of each of the four major categories of mise-en-scene.

Answer: Answers will vary

Bloom’s level: Apply

Instructor info: Leave a slide on the screen from a film shown in class that exemplifies all four aspects of mise-en-scene for the duration of this question, or show a brief clip a few times.


52. Discuss the problems with using realism as a criterion for evaluating films, giving specific examples from any of the films shown for this class.

Answer: Answers will vary

Bloom’s level: Analyze
53. Discuss which compositional elements (moving objects versus static ones, color, balance, and size) guide your eye around the screen in the shots in the clip. Be as specific as possible in your descriptions.

Answer: Answers will vary

Bloom’s level: Evaluate

Instructor info: Show a brief clip from a film, preferably one the students have seen before; if the film is in black and white, substitute “lighting” for “color” in the question.


54. Discuss how Michelangelo Antonioni uses mise-en-scene through time and space to tell the story in his film L’Avventura.

Answer: Answers will vary

Bloom’s level: Analyze

Instructor info: You may wish to show the clip several times before the students begin writing.


55. Select a moment from relatively recent film, such as Silence of the Lambs or Jerry Maguire, and discuss how meaning is conveyed purely through the actor’s physical self.

Answer: Answers will vary

Bloom’s level: Evaluate

56. Discuss which depth cues (overlap, aerial perspective, size diminution) are used to create an illusion of three-dimensional space in these shots.

Answer: Answers will vary

Bloom’s level: Analyze

Instructor info: Show a slide or a brief clip from a film, preferably one the students have seen. To make this question more challenging, eliminate “(overlap, aerial perspective, size diminution).” Questions 55 and 56 below could be used together with the same clip; show the clip a second time halfway through the time allotted for the questions. For more challenging questions, ask the students to name the compositional and depth cues in each question. Note that since movement is an important cue both for compositional attention and depth, these two questions work best with a clip, though they could be used with a slide. To make the question still more challenging, ask the students to discuss how the compositional elements and depth cues guide the spectator’s perception and how they function in the scene.



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