Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Background Information



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Charlie and the Chocolate Factory



  1. Background Information

    1. Age: 7 or 8 graders

    2. Time: 240 minutes/per week

    3. Class size: 25 people

  2. Why Teach with Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

When reading Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, I felt relaxed and got a lot of pleasure. This story is not only interesting and imaginative but also reflecting. Since we read for pleasure and understanding, I think this book is suitable for giving teenagers both of them.

  1. Author

Roald Dahl was a British novelist, short story writer, poet, fighter pilot and screenwriter. Dahl rose to prominence in the 1940s with works for both children and adults, and became one of the world’s best-selling authors. He has been referred to as “one of the greatest storytellers for children of the 20th century.” In 2008 The Times placed Dahl 16th on its list of “The 50 greatest British writers since 1945.” His short stories are known for their unexpected endings, and his children's books for their unsentimental, often very dark humor. Some of his notable works include James and the Giant Peach, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, George's Marvellous Medicine, Fantastic Mr Fox, Matilda, The Witches and The BFG.

  1. Summary


Bucket was a kind boy who lived in poverty. He loved chocolate very much but he could only get one chocolate bar on his birthday every year. Willy Wonka is the owner of the biggest chocolate factory in the world; however, no one had seen him for fifteen years. One day, Willy Wonka announced that there are five golden tickets in the chocolate bars around the world. Children who got the golden tickets could visit his factory. In the adventure of visiting the chocolate factory, four children dropped out one by one due to their vices. Eventually, hoping that Charlie could inherit this factory, Willy Wonka gave his chocolate factory to Charlie Bucket.

  1. Setting

Although the main setting of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is a magical confectionery, it begins in a contemporary industrial area known simply as “a great town.” Because Dahl never mentions the city's name or location, he gives a sense of universality to the story. It could be taking place in practically any large city in England or America. The city, however, has one distinguishing characteristic: it is the home of Wonka's factory.

  1. Character

    1. Charlie Bucket: the main character of the novel.

    2. Augustus Gloop: a greedy boy.

    3. Veruca Salt: a girl who is spoiled by her parents.

    4. Violet Beauregarde: a girl who chews gum all day long.

    5. Mike Teavee: a boy who does nothing but watch television.

    6. Willy Wonka: the owner of the Wonka chocolate factory.




  1. Theme

    1. Once there is a chance, there is a hope.

    2. The poverty vs. the wealth

    3. What goes around comes around

  2. Nine-week curriculum


Week 1

  1. Materials

    1. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

    2. computer, projector and PPTs

    3. 25 notebooks and 25 portfolios

    4. 50 pieces of paper

  2. Teacher’s Activity

    1. Announce the syllabus on reading Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

    2. Introduce the author by using PPTs

    3. Briefly introduce Charlie and the Chocolate Factory on setting, genre and characters by using PPTs

    4. Read aloud Chapter 1

    5. Share a tongue twister about “factory”

      1. They hatch fish at the state fish hatchery and sell hatched fish to the fish stick factory.

    6. Divide students into 5 groups

  3. Students’ Activity

    1. Silent reading on Chapter 2-3

    2. Discuss writing prompts with group members and write them on the notebook

      1. What environment did Charlie grow up? How do you know?

      2. What fantastic things did Mr. Wonka invent?  Appendix 12

      3. Since Grandpa Joe told Charlie that there were no ordinary workers in Wonka’s factory, who do you think working there?
    3. Create their own candy! Draw it down and share with the group members what would it taste like and what other effects would it have. Appendix 1


    4. Make a share sheets on Chapter 1-3 and discuss with group membersAppendix 2

Week 2

  1. Materials

    1. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

    2. 25 handouts of introducing poetry

    3. 50 pieces of paper

    4. 8 posters and 10 markers

  2. Teacher’s Activity

    1. Invite students to recall and talk about what happened in Chapter 1-3

    2. Read aloud Chapter 4

    3. Introduce the characteristics and format of poetry by handouts

    4. Read aloud “Chocolate” by Ross Bateman and “It’s all about the Chocolate “ by Marilyn LottAppendix 3

  3. Students’ Activity

    1. Silent reading on Chapter 5-8

    2. Discuss writing prompts with group members and write them on the notebook

      1. Why Mr. Wonka asked workers to leave?

      2. What can owners of the Golden Tickets do and get?

      3. Until now, who got the Golden Tickets?

    3. First, discuss the characteristics of four children who got the Golden Tickets with group members. Then compare and contrast Charlie with them and put it down on the notebook Appendix 4

    4. Design a golden ticket to be hidden inside a chocolate bar. Appendix 5
    5. List 3-5 words from Chapter 1-8 that is new or interesting for students on the notebook and each group has to make a word wall on a posterAppendix 6


Week 3

  1. Materials

    1. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

    2. 25 handouts on Jeremy Lin

    3. 8 posters and 10 markers

  2. Teacher’s Activity

    1. Invite students to recall and talk about what happened in Chapter 4-8

    2. Read aloud Chapter 9

    3. Share the news of Jeremy Lin with students by using handoutsAppendix 7

  3. Students’ Activity

    1. Silent reading on Chapter 10-12

    2. Discuss writing prompts with group members and write them on the notebook

      1. How do you think about Grandpa Joe?

      2. If you were Charlie, would you take the bill on the street and buy a chocolate bar?

      3. Imagine that Charlie kept a diary. Write about the day that Charlie found the Golden Ticket.

    3. Discuss the similarity between Charlie and Jeremy Lin with partners

    4. Each group writes a brief summary from Chapter 1-12Appendix 8

Week 4

  1. Materials

    1. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

    2. 25 pieces of paper

    3. 8 posters and 10 markers

  2. Teacher’s Activity

    1. Invite students to recall and talk about what happened in Chapter 9-12
    2. Read aloud Chapter 13


    3. Talk about how to write a descriptive paragraph

  3. Students’ Activity

    1. Silent reading on Chapter 14-16

    2. Discuss writing prompts with group members and write them on the notebook

      1. Willy Wonka warns the children not to get lost when they first enter the Chocolate Factory. Imagine that one of them does wander off where they shouldn’t. What might they discover?

      2. Everything is made of sweets and chocolate in the Chocolate Room. Imagine that your classroom is made of similar things and describe what it is like.

      3. What would happen to Augustus Gloop?

    3. Volunteers present the idea of the second prompts on stage

    4. Visualize and color Willy Wonka according to the description on p.57Appendix 9

      1. He had a black top hat on his head.

      2. He wore a tail coat made of beautiful plum-colored velvet.

      3. His trousers were bottle green……

    5. List 3-5 words from Chapter 9-16 that is new or interesting for students on the notebook and each group has to make a word wall on a poster

Week 5

  1. Materials

    1. Charlie and the chocolate Factory

    2. 8 posters and 10 markers

  2. Teacher’s Activity

    1. Invite students to recall and talk about what happened in Chapter 13-16

    2. Read aloud Chapter 17
    3. Talk about how to write a compare and contrast paragraph


  3. Student’s Activity

    1. Silent reading on Chapter 18-20

    2. Discuss writing prompts with group members and write them on the notebook

      1. What did the song on p.78-80 mean?

      2. Use several sentences to describe the inventing room.

      3. What would happen to Violet?

    3. Based on what was written in Week 2 and write a paragraph of comparing and contrasting Augustus and Charlie. Appendix 10

    4. Each group writes a brief summary from Chapter 13-20

Week 6

  1. Materials

    1. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

    2. Look What I’ve Got

    3. 8 posters and 10 markers

  2. Teacher’s Activity

    1. Invite students to recall and talk about what happened in Chapter 17-20

    2. Read aloud Chapter 21

    3. Read aloud the picture book “Look What I’ve Got” by Anthony Browne

    4. Share tongue twisters about “gum”

      1. Double bubble gum, bubbles double.

      2. How much oil boil can a gum boil boil if a gum boil can boil oil?

  3. Students’ Activity

    1. Silent reading on Chapter 22-25

    2. Discuss writing prompts with group members and write them on the notebook

      1. Why Violet became like a gigantic blueberry?
      2. Imagine that you were given a stick of Willy Wonka’s chewing-gum meal. Write some sentences to describe how it tastes and how the delicious flavors change when you chew it.


    3. Discuss the similarity between Jeremy and Veruca Salt

    4. Based on what was written in Week 2 and write a paragraph of comparing and contrasting Veruca and Charlie.

    5. List 3-5 words from Chapter 17-25 that is new or interesting for students on the notebook and each group has to make a word wall on a poster

Week 7

  1. Materials

    1. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

    2. Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator

    3. 8 posters and 10 markers

  2. Teacher’s Activity

    1. Invite students to recall and talk about what happened in Chapter 21-25

    2. Read aloud Chapter 26

    3. Recommend students Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator to students

  3. Students’ Avtivity

    1. Silent reading on Chapter 27-30

    2. Discuss writing prompts with group members and write them on the notebook

      1. Compare the illustrations of the children arriving at and leaving the factory. How have the children changed?

      2. Which is the worst offense: being gluttonous (eating too much), greedy, spoiled, or lazy? Which of those do you relate to the most? (No one's judging – we're all guilty of something!)

      3. How do you think about Willy Wonka? Is he a good and caring person, or a selfish and aloof one?

      4. What would happen after Charlie get the chocolate factory?
    3. Each group draws a action map of five children on the posterAppendix 11


Week 8

  1. Materials

    1. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

    2. Computer and projector

  2. Teacher’s Activity

    1. Play a video clip which demonstrate the reader theater (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xToksmVgytM)

    2. Assigned each group what to present in reader theater

    3. Walk around the class to give each group suggestions

  3. Students’ Activity

    1. Practice reader theater

    2. Make their own name cards before presenting reader theater

    3. Present reader theater on stage

Week 9

  1. Materials

    1. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

    2. All portfolios and notebooks

  2. Teacher’s Activity

    1. Circle time: ask students’ feeling of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and the activities

    2. Decorate the classroom for “Works Exhibition”

  3. Students Activity

    1. Arrange their portfolios and notebooks in order

    2. Read and learn to appreciate others’ works

(Appendix 3)

Chocolate

By Ross Bateman

Chocolate, chocolate, chocolate chocolate chocolate!

When you take a bite, you will taste its delight,

chocolate, chocolate, chocolate chocolate chocolate,

it is so nice, sometimes covered in rice!

Chocolate, chocolate, chocolate chocolate chocolate!

It will make you scream, and sometimes will be covered in cream!

Chocolate, chocolate, chocolate chocolate chocolate,

when you take a nibble the side, it will take you on a fantastic ride!

Chocolate, chocolate, chocolate chocolate chocolate!

It will make you jump with joy, it will make you act so coy!

chocolate, chocolate, chocolate chocolate chocolate,

Pay for the choclate with every last penny, and buy so many and many!


It’s all about the Chocolate!

By Marilyn Lott

When certain holidays come around

I have often noticed it is true

It’s all about the chocolate

It is for me, now, how about you?


First on the holiday list is, of course

Valentine’s Day at the top of the year

Boxes of chocolate candies

Or chocolate roses sweet and clear


Easter is right around the corner then

Chocolate eggs and bunnies so sweet

Fancy paper wrapped around chocolate

Is such a wonderful treat


Of course, at Christmas there are Santa’s

In every shape and size

Finding them in the Christmas stocking

Is always a wonderful surprise


There is chocolate on a stick as well

They are so creamy and so yummy

Chocolate fountains with special treats

Are just perfect for my tummy


It really doesn’t matter at all, however

You can just be sad or stuck in a rut

Go visit the candy counters ‘cause

It is all about the chocolate!

(Appendix 7)

Jeremy Lin's Story a Blueprint for Why You Should Never Give Up on a Dream

By Michael Moraitis(Featured Columnist) on May 24, 2012


In the history of sports, winning and talent normally transcend race, but the same hasn’t held true for Jeremy Lin of the New York Knicks.

His meteoric rise to fame didn’t come easy and Lin had to earn every opportunity he could get because they were few and far between.
Lin doesn’t look like the majority of players in the NBA.
When most people think of an NBA player, they stereotype them as either African-American or Caucasian with an instance of a Hispanic player here and there.
But “Linsanity” wasn’t only the first case of a Chinese- or Taiwanese-American dominating an NBA floor, it was the first case of a Chinese- or Taiwanese-American stepping onto an NBA floor period.
The most telling evidence of a double standard resulting in Lin’s race first began with his attempts to get into a college to play basketball. Even though he was one of the best high school players in the state of California, Lin wasn’t offered a single scholarship from any Division I team in the NCAA.
Even Lin himself believes his race played a role.
“I'm not saying top-5 (basketball player in) state automatically gets you offers, but I do think (my ethnicity) did affect the way coaches recruited me,” Lin said in an interview with the San Francisco Chronicle in December 2008. “I think if I were a different race, I would've been treated differently.”
In college, Lin put up an impressive resume with Harvard, but didn’t nearly get the respect he deserved.
I know it’s often that a college player’s school and division can be held against their draft stock, but you would think scoring 1,483 points, 487 rebounds, 406 assists and 225 steals would at least get you drafted in one of the NBA draft’s two rounds.

Undrafted, Lin finally got his chance when he signed with the Golden State Warriors in 2010. He barely got on the floor and averaged less than three points per game. He was later released without even a second thought, again despite a resume that showed talent in his past.

The Houston Rockets were the next team to take a chance. However, he never played a single game for them and Lin was released before the start of this season.

Then, it was fate that brought Lin to New York.
Not only were the Knicks battling injury in the beginning of the season, they were in a desperate search for a point guard to fill the void left by Baron Davis and his injured back. Nobody in-house could get the job done and Lin was the next man to get a try.
Lin would finally get his opportunity on February 4th against the New Jersey Nets when then-coach Mike D’Antoni inserted him into the game.
Lin dropped 25 points on the Nets and thus began his historic rise to fame.
He single-handedly carried the Knicks while both Carmelo Anthony and Amar’e Stoudemire were out due to injury at the same time. In fact, one could argue the Knicks wouldn’t have made the playoffs without him. The Knicks looked doomed at 8-15 before Lin took over the team.
The numbers Lin put up in his first several career starts were unmatched in the history of the NBA. It was almost as if J-Lin was catching up for all the lost time he spent undeservedly on the back end of the benches of NBA teams.
While the story of Jeremy Lin is still being written, there’s no doubt the Knicks’ point guard had to overcome adversity for something he had no control over in the first place.

(Appendix 8)

Charlie Bucket was a kind boy who lived in poverty. He loved chocolate very much but he could only get one chocolate bar on his birthday every year. Willy Wonka is the owner of the biggest chocolate factory in the world; however, no one had seen him for fifteen years. One day, Willy Wonka announced that there are five golden tickets in the chocolate bars around the world. Children who got the golden tickets could visit his factory. The five children are as following: Augustus Gloop, Veruca Salt, Violet Beauregarde, Mike Teavee and Charlie Bucket.

(Appendix 10)

Augustus is a fat boy because eating is hobby. In addition, the reason that he got the Golden Ticket is that he ate endless chocolate. On the other hand, Charlie is thin and he never had enough food to eat, not to mentioned endless chocolate. Charlie only got one chocolate bar each year.


(Appendix 12)

Mr. Wonka invented two things. One is _______________, it _______________ under the hot sun. The other is ______________, it _______________________________________________________.



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