Chicka Chicka Boom Boom Reading Lesson: Day 1 Grade Level: Kindergarten Materials Needed



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Chicka Chicka Boom Boom


Reading Lesson: Day 1
Grade Level: Kindergarten
Materials Needed:

  • Copy of story Chicka Chicka Boom Boom in big book and small book format.

  • Alphabet cards

  • Coconut tree and letters (can be teacher made or store bought manipulative)

  • Small box filled with sand and comb for each student.

  • Paper for student illustrations


Focus and Review:
To begin the lesson students will sing the alphabet song as the teacher holds up alphabet cards for the students to see.
The teacher will give a short booktalk about the story. The students will work to place the letters on the coconut tree. Once all letters are on the tree, the teacher will randomly point to letters and ask for the sound associated with that letter and have students name an object that begins with that same letter.
Objective:
Students will review the alphabet. Students will use alphabet knowledge to associate the letters heard in a story to recall each letter, how to make the letter, and the sound the letter makes.
Teacher Input:

The teacher will read aloud the story, Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, for enjoyment and to give students a sense of what the story is about. As the book is read, the children will participate by placing the corresponding letter onto the coconut tree. When the letters all fall off of the tree in the story, the children all fall down as well, and chant, “Chicka Chicka…BOOM! BOOM!

During the second reading of the story students will be given a small sandbox and a small plastic comb for erasing. Students will be reminded that coconut trees grow in the sand. As the story is read aloud, students will be given the opportunity to form each letter as it appears in the text. Students will comb the sand after each letter to prepare for the next one.

Guided Practice:
To enhance student’s letter recognition skills the teacher will play a game with the students. Six consecutive letters will be placed in order on the table for children to see. For example: a,b,c,d,e, & g. Once children look at the letters and become familiar with them, the teacher will place them out of order before removing one and ask, “What’s missing?”
Independent Practice:
Students will choose one letter from the coconut tree to take back to their work area. They will be instructed to write the letter in upper and lower case. Next students will be asked to think of an object that begins will that letter and illustrate it on their paper.
Closure:
Students will share their drawing and then the class will sing the alpha

Chicka Chicka Boom Boom



Reading Lesson: Day 2
Grade Level: Kindergarten
Materials Needed:


  • Copy of story Chicka Chicka Boom Boom in big book and small book format.

  • Alphabet cards

  • Coconut tree and letters (can be teacher made or store bought manipulative)

  • Objects that make noise (bubble wrap, cellophane, bell, small percussion instrument, etc.)

  • Chart paper and sentence strip

  • Tape and tape recorder

  • Paper for student illustrations
  • Reproducible: Words that Make Noise



Focus and Review:
Students will be asked to tell the teacher about the story that was read the previous day. Students will then be given the alphabet cards to place in order.
Objective:
Students will learn that sometimes authors use nonsense words in their books just for fun. Students will find examples in the story and apply it to other examples in the real world.

Teacher Input:
The teacher will explain that authors use noise words to help readers “hear” what is going on. The teacher will introduce the word onomatopoeia to students by showing it written on sentence strip and by saying the word, and help them try to repeat the word. The teacher will tell students to find “noise words” in the story while it is being read aloud. Ask students to indicate when they hear a noise word by repeating that noise.

Guided Practice:
After reading, the group will brainstorm other “noise words” and talk about what kinds of things might make these noises. These words will be listed on chart paper. Students will be given objects to experiment with to hear their noises. These noises will be added to the chart.
Independent Practice
Students will choose an object and listen carefully to the sound the object makes. The student will draw the object and write the corresponding sound. Students may copy words from the chart, use invented spelling, or dictate sounds to the teacher. When pages are complete the teacher will record each student reading the page and making the accompanying noise. The pages can be put together to make a class book.
Closure:

Students will share their illustrations and sounds with the class. The class will listen to the recordings and will have the option of joining in and making the sounds they hear.


Chicka Chicka Boom Boom

Reading Lesson: Day 3
Grade Level: Kindergarten
Materials Needed:


  • Copy of story Chicka Chicka Boom Boom in big book and small book format.

  • Picture of coconut tree

  • Real coconut

  • Reproducible: Sequencing

  • Reproducible: Chant with Me


Focus and Review:
Ask a student(s) to volunteer to tell about the story we having been working with the past two days and the activities we have done.
Students will be given a copy of the Chant with Me reproducible to practice fluency and “chunking” words together. An enlarged copy will also be available for students to see in the front of the classroom. The teacher will read aloud the chant to students. Point out to students how you chunk or group certain words together to make the chant sound “good” and make sense. Explain that good readers try to sound natural when they read aloud-the way they do when they talk. Emphasize that although a chant is read in a rhythm which sounds different from talking, regular conversation has a rhythm as well. Reread the chant, this time emphasizing the chunking of the words as you point to them on the enlarged copy. Have students use their fingers or pencils to point to the words as they read the chant.
Objective:

Students will learn that fluency if important during reading. Students will practice fluency skills by echoing what the teacher has read.


Students will learn that stories have a beginning, middle, and end. Students will analyze the story to find these parts. Students will also be asked to summarize what they have learned by answering questions about the story.
Teacher Input:

Tell students what an echo is, and have them practice echoing by repeating some of the noises or words you say. Read the story aloud, pausing where appropriate, then have the class echo you. Praise students who use the same expression or fluidity you used as you read. After students become comfortable, point to students and let them echo your reading one at a time.

After reading through the book once practicing fluency, ask students the following questions:

“Have you ever climbed a tree? What might happen if you climb a tree? Have you ever seen a coconut? Where do coconuts grow? Who might climb a coconut tree?” Show pictures of a coconut tree and bring in a real coconut to share.


Tell students that good readers think while they read. This is called “active reading” because their brains should be active, or “on”, at the same time they are listening to or reading the story. Help students listen and think about what is happening at the beginning, middle, and end of the story.
Guided Practice:

Give each student a copy of the reproducible Sequencing. After you have read the pages in which the alphabet goes up the tree, pause and ask students to summarize what has happened so far in the story. After doing this orally, have each student illustrate what has happened in the first coconut. Continue reading and pause again after the letters all fall down. Ask students to summarize what has happened and then illustrate it on the second coconut. Repeat until the story is complete and students fill in the last coconut. Then review what happened at the beginning, middle, and end.


Independent Practice:
To make sure students really understand the text students must be able to understand lower and higher order thinking questions. Allow them to respond to the following questions by dictating the answers to the teacher or illustrating the answers on a piece of paper.


Lower Order:

  1. Who climbed the tree?

  2. What kind of tree did the letters climb?

  3. What did D say to E,F, and G?

  4. What happened when the whole alphabet went up the tree?


Higher Order:
  1. Why do you think the letters wanted to climb the tree?


  2. Do you think any of the letters were scared to climb the tree? If so, which ones and why?

  3. What did the letters do at the top of the tree?

  4. What do you think will happen if they climb the tree again?

  5. Who do you think will take A’s dare at the end?

  6. What would you do if someone dared you to climb a tree?


Closure:
Reread the story pausing at certain places to have students echo your reading. Invite other students to lead the echo.

Resources: Aguerre, Elizabeth. First-Rate Reading. Greensboro, NC: Carson-Dellosa Publishing Company, 2004.
Activity Tree for Chicka Chicka Boom Boom

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