Child’s permanence report (cpr)/annex b report

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CHILD’S PERMANENCE REPORT (CPR)/ANNEX B REPORT

GUIDANCE NOTES AND ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

May 2014
Checklist for the CPR/Annex B report

(can be attached to report)

The Child’s Permanence Report (CPR) and Annex B report includes the following paperwork:

Section A: The report and matters for proceedings (this is only needed as a front sheet to the Annex B report)

CPR / Section B: The child and the birth family – factual information about the child and the significant people involved in their lives; descriptive report on the child; key information on those people who are significant to the child (completed as applicable) and contact arrangements; views of all relevant parties; and the actions of the adoption agency

CPR / Section C: The recommendations made by the adoption agency

Tick to indicate which sections have been completed and are included

Section A

The report

Required







Matters for the proceedings

Required




Section B/ Part 1

Up-to-date photo of child


Required






Adoption agency details

Required






Essential information on the child

Required






Descriptive report on the child

Required






Wishes and feelings of the child

Required






The child’s birth mother

Required






The child’s birth father

Required






Other people with PR

As applicable






Other relatives or relevant people

As applicable






Siblings

As applicable




Part 2

Contact plans – current and proposed

Required




Part 3

Decisions and actions of the agency

Required






The views of the child’s birth mother and birth father

Required






Assessments of birth parents and relatives

Required




Section C

Recommendations

Required




Additional paperwork for ADM

Additional paperwork required for agency decision-maker (ADM), e.g. court reports, sibling assessments, medical report and foster carer’s report on the child should be appended to this report when an agency decision is being sought.

Required for agency decision




Notes for Guidance
General

The purpose of the Child’s Permanence Report is to enable the agency decision-maker (ADM) and, where appropriate, the adoption panel to discharge their functions under the Adoption Agencies Regulations 2005 and subsequent amendments, including compliance with the welfare checklist in section 1 of the Act. Additional guidance is available in the Adoption Statutory Guidance Chapter 1.1 These are:


  • to recommend/decide whether the child should be placed for adoption;

  • to recommend/decide that the child should be placed with prospective adopters;

  • as the source of essential information to the prospective adopters when first approached by the agency about a child to enable them to decide whether to proceed with the matching process;

  • as a source of important information about the child’s background and heritage to the adopters once any placement is made;

  • as a source of important information for the adopted adult about their life history and heritage;

  • as the referral form for the Adoption Registers for England and Wales.

The Child’s Permanence Report is an essential tool in enabling the adoption agency to plan for the future life of a child.


The Annex B report provides the evidence required to support the application made by the local authority for a placement order and meets the requirements of Practice Direction 14C. Along with other documents submitted to the court, it will enable the court to decide whether adoption is the right plan for the child and whether a placement order should be made.

This revised version of the CPR has been designed so that it can also be used as the Annex B report to accompany the placement order application, to eliminate duplication of work for social workers. The headings of the form have been ordered as much as possible to meet the requirements of the Annex B report and the Adoption Agencies Regulations, including Schedule 1, whilst maintaining the coherence of the child’s story. It has also taken account of the requirements of the care template so that relevant information can be transferred between these reports. The form has been piloted by eight local authorities: Birmingham, Calderdale, Derby, Plymouth, Sandwell, Somerset, South Gloucestershire and Tower Hamlets. We are grateful to all those involved who participated in the pilot and provided feedback to assist in the development of the template.

In writing this report, it is important to remember these different functions and purposes and potential audiences for the report. It is also important to be compliant with the requirements set out in regulations in relation to information in post-commencement adoptions and obtaining necessary consents. For the report to fulfil these functions, it will need to be accurate, up to date, balanced, coherent and complete.
The report combines facts about the child and the people who have played an important part in their life to date. It also contains evidence about the child’s development and their need for a permanent family. The report will combine the work of many different people contributing their experience, understanding and knowledge of the child and their circumstances. These people will include:


  • professionals from health, education and social care, including foster carers;

  • the wishes, views and feelings of the child, wherever these can be made available;

  • the child’s parents and other birth family members;

  • other significant people in the child’s life.

The accuracy of the Child’s Permanence Report (CPR) is essential since it will not only form the basis on which decisions are made about whether the child should be placed for adoption, but will also assist the agency in matching the child with an appropriate prospective adopter, and will be the source of the information about the child on which the prospective adopter will rely. In due course the child, on reaching adulthood, will be able to request a copy of the CPR under the Disclosure of Adoption Information (Post-Commencement Adoptions) Regulations (AIR), and may have to rely on this document as the principal source of information about their pre-adoption history. The material gathered together for this report also needs to be evaluated and analysed so there is a clear understanding of the child’s current and future needs and how these can be met.

Completing the form

BAAF Form CPR (2014) is available only as an electronic template. The main report has been ordered in three sections linked to those required in the Annex B report, but these will be presented as one document. The front sheet can be adapted to reflect the legal status of the report, i.e. a CPR for a child being placed with consent, a CPR where an application for a placement order will be made, or as an Annex B report. There is an additional front sheet provided with this guidance – the required front sheet for Section A of the Annex B report. The details of information included in each section are set out in the checklist in this guidance which can also be included with the panel paperwork.

The forms for collecting the views of birth parents and the child are included with this guidance. The information gathered from these should be incorporated into the main document rather than being attached to the CPR and should then be placed on the child’s adoption file.

There will be a need to update the report at appropriate times, e.g. when a match is being presented to the adoption panel, and it will be important that the most up-to-date reports are placed on the child’s adoption file and given to the prospective adopters.

GUIDANCE NOTES – these refer to the superscript letters in brackets in the form

a) Genogram. The child’s family tree is required by the AAR. The template for the genogram in the care application can be used here, updated if needed. Where a family is very large and/or complicated, it may be clearer to list the relevant family members in the family composition section. The genogram should normally go back to the child’s grandparents’ generation and include all siblings and half-siblings, and significant extended family members. Use dates of birth where known rather than ages.

b) Qualification to prepare the report. The Restriction on the Preparation of Adoption Reports Regulations 2005 apply here. This means that the social worker must have at least three years’ post-qualifying experience in child care social work, including direct experience of adoption work, or be supervised by a social worker who is employed by the local authority or adoption agency and has at least three years’ post-qualifying experience in child care social work, including direct experience of adoption work.

c) Insert title of relevant manager as identified by the agency.

d) For link social worker, give details of the identified worker and their role in the agency, e.g. family finder/home finder.

e) Updates are likely to be required at each stage the report is used. There should be an agreed agency policy for identifying updates and the author, if not the original author.

f) The social worker should withhold confidential placement information if applicable. (This could be inserted into the CPR at a later stage, e.g. for matching.) When the report is submitted to court as the Annex B report, FPR 2010 r29.1(2) makes provision for the name of the carer(s) and the child’s current address to be confirmed in a separate document if necessary.

g) Ethnicity. The Office for National Statistics (ONS) sets out that ‘the terminology used to describe ethnic groups has changed markedly over time and however defined or measured, tends to evolve in the context of social and political attitudes or developments. Ethnic group is also very diverse, encompassing common ancestry and elements of culture, identity, religion, language and physical appearance.’ It recommends that people should be invited to select, from a list of categories, the ethnic group to which they consider they belong. These categories are also now used by Ofsted and so will be familiar to social workers. The groups are set out below.



A White

English/Welsh/ Scottish/Northern Irish/British

Irish

Gypsy or Irish Traveller

Any other White background, please describe

B Mixed/MULTIPLE ETHNIC GROUPS

White and Black Caribbean

White and Black African

White and Asian

Any other mixed/multiple ethnic background

C Asian/ASIAN BRITISH

Indian

Pakistani

Bangladeshi

Chinese

D Black/AFRICAN/CARIBBEAN/BLACK BRITISH

African

Caribbean

Any other Black/African/Caribbean background, please describe

E OTHER ETHNIC GROUP

Arab

Any other ethnic group, please describe

If these groups do not reflect the way in which the individual identifies themself, use their own preferred way of doing this.

Where more detailed information needs to be presented about the child’s ethnic identity, this should be entered in the relevant section on ‘Identity’.

h) Include all known siblings and half-siblings. Use birth names of any children who have been adopted. More detail on the child’s siblings will be included in the later section on the child’s parents and other significant people.

i) CAFCASS Guardian’s views. Where court proceedings are taking place, it is important that the children’s guardian’s views are conveyed to the decision-maker, particularly if these differ from those of the local authority. Their view at this stage will be a provisional one based on the evidence available and it should be made clear whether they have provided a written view which has been inserted into the report or whether the social worker is representing their view given verbally.

There may also be expert reports available which have been prepared in connection with the court proceedings. Although this may sometimes give rise to difficulties of timing, it is essential that these or a summary (agreed between the local authority’s legal adviser and the other parties to the proceedings) should be made available to the decision-maker.

j) Chronology of the child’s care since birth. The chronology should include all of the moves and changes of carer experienced by the child to date, including parents and other birth family members as well as other carers. The Annex B requires observations on the care provided in each placement. This should be a brief overall summary as it can be covered in more detail as needed in the child’s history. The placement details should describe the type of placement (e.g. with family members, foster placement, residential, etc), who the carers were, and state briefly the reasons for any move/change of placement, with more detail being provided in the child’s history section. This information may be transferred from the social work care template.

k) Include sources of information from any historical records used, as well as reports commissioned for current court proceedings.

l) The physical description should complement the photograph of the child and should include any information not obvious in the photograph, for example, if the child is bigger or smaller than the average for his or her age and any striking characteristics.

Briefly describe the child’s personality. Given the subjective nature of this description and the likelihood that the child will read this in later life, considerable care should be exercised in using words and phrases that are accurate and give a balanced and helpful picture of the child. All descriptions of the child will need updating to reflect the child’s development. The foster carer will often be the best placed to “bring the child to life”, but it will be important for the social worker to also draw on their own knowledge of the child as well as that of other relevant people, e.g. teachers, nursery workers, parents. It should be made clear where information/views about the child have come from and if there are differing perceptions of the child in different settings.


Interests, likes and dislikes. Describe the child’s particular interest in hobbies, music, sporting activities, etc. If she or he has particular aptitudes or talents, these should be noted. If there are significant things the child dislikes, these should also be noted.

Information on self-care should be given in relation to the child’s age and developmental stage. Describe the child’s capacity to appropriately care for themselves in relation to their age and abilities. Describe the child’s daily routines, including eating, washing, toileting, getting dressed, bedtimes, and leaving for playgroup/nursery/school. Are there any specific factors that need to be taken into account in placing the child in an adoptive family? This should include any special arrangements needed to support the child in developing their self-care skills or daily routines. If the child has any particular dislikes in relation to daily routines, self-care, etc, these should be described.

The child’s current level of emotional, behavioural and social development should include a description and evaluation of the child’s capacity for making and sustaining relationships, and address the following:


  • how their current carers describe them in terms of warmth, enjoyment or wariness of intimacy, their playfulness, their responses to daily routines, to boundaries being set and to changes in routines or circumstances;

  • how the child is developing relationships with other children in the family, including siblings, foster children or the birth children of their carers;

  • how the child is developing relationships with those outside the family such as friends, children at school, teachers. Do they maintain appropriate wariness of strangers or are they over-familiar?
  • the child’s developing “sense of belonging” to important people in their life;


  • information from any strengths/difficulties questionnaire (SDQ) completed.

Under identity, consider the child’s awareness of his or her relationship to the birth family and foster family and the development of their identity.
Each child will have a developing sense of who they are and what is important in the world around them. This will become the basis of self-esteem and identity. There are a number of factors that build towards this: the child’s physical capacities, including any disability; their social class; culture; their ethnicity; their language; their religion; their sex; and their sexuality. Each of these factors singly and in combination will influence the way the child feels, thinks, behaves and makes relationships. It will be central to their sense of belonging to important people and their sense of community, culture and wider society. The people who care for them and provide them with opportunities and guidance will be vital in this. Adoption itself will have an important impact on the child’s developing sense of self, including the acquisition of an “adoption identity”. Include details in this section about the child’s ethnicity, religion and how the child views himself/herself.

m) Child’s health. The health section should not duplicate information from the medical adviser’s summary but should give information about their general health and mental health and any learning difficulties if these are not covered in the medical report. It can include observations from foster carers on the child’s general health and give details such as their height and weight and whether they are meeting their developmental milestones.

The summary report from the agency medical adviser should be attached or inserted into the report. This must include the child’s health history, current state of health and any anticipated health care needs (AAR 17b); information about the birth parents’ health, including any known learning difficulties, medical or mental health factors which are likely to or may have genetic implications for the child (AAR 16(2)); and the date of the most recent medical examination. It is very important to ensure that any known genetic risk factors or any health conditions or disability which may be significant are identified here and information about the child’s family health history which may be relevant to the child’s future and future placement is highlighted. Where information about birth parents’ health is disclosed during assessments undertaken during proceedings, the social worker should ensure that this updated information is passed on to the medical adviser so the medical summary can be updated.

n) Education. Using the details from the section on the child’s education, outline the significant factors about the child’s education (including early education in playgroups or nursery) and their progress to date, and the anticipated needs of the child in relation to their education that should be taken into account in planning the adoptive placement. If the child is of nursery or school age, include any key points or recommendations from the child’s Personal Education Plan (PEP).

Detail the child’s experience of education. What sort of educational experiences has she or he enjoyed? Where there is some indication of the sort of educational setting which will best suit the child, give details so prospective adopters can begin to research this in their area.


o) Summary of relevant family history and the child’s history. This is a crucial section and should be written specifically for this report, rather than being “cut and pasted” from other reports. A brief summary should be given of the relevant family history to help explain the local authority’s involvement and the situation the child was born into. Each birth parent’s history can be covered in more depth in later sections.

The child’s history section should be used to set out this child’s “story” and bring together the facts contained in other parts of this report to “tell” this story. This section should therefore be both a description and an analysis, and should include the following.



  • Prenatal experiences, where known. Was the child exposed to alcohol and/or other substances? Include prescription medication as well as illicit medication. Was there domestic violence or other trauma during the mother’s pregnancy? This should be based not just on parental reports, but also evidence from other sources, e.g. medical or police reports.

  • The structure and membership of the child’s birth family, drawing on information from the family tree.

  • The child’s relationships with their birth mother and father and other members of the extended family who have cared for them and how these have impacted on the child.


  • Their experience of being parented by their birth parents and the reasons they became looked after.

  • The known facts about and consequences of any abuse or neglect, and how this has influenced the child’s emotional and behavioural development.

  • Include any significant events, both positive and negative, which the child may have some memory of and also identify any gaps in the child’s records.

  • Their experiences of being cared for by foster carers, residential care workers or others as their principal carers. Refer back to the chronology of care and expand on the reasons for any changes of carer and consider the way in which previous moves occurred and have impacted on the child’s emotional and behavioural development.

This section should cover up to the present day and will need to be updated at each point the report is used.

p) Analysis of the child’s needs. This should be an analysis and summary of the child’s needs based on their history and should include information provided from other sources, e.g. the current carer, school, and health professionals. The social worker can consider the skills and qualities which a prospective adopter will need but should not be too prescriptive about the characteristics required of adopters, e.g. only able to consider a two-parent family, or stating preferred ethnicity. This information may be available in the social work care template but should be updated as necessary.

q) Child’s wishes and feelings. Information from the child’s wishes and feelings worksheet, where used with children who are old enough, can be reflected here but this section should also take account of the wishes and feelings that the child has expressed in other ways, e.g. to foster carers, in contact sessions and at school. This section should be updated to reflect the child’s changing understanding and development. Include the date when the child’s wishes and feelings were last ascertained.

r) Social worker’s summary of the wishes and feelings of the child. This should include an assessment of the child’s level of understanding and give details of any direct work undertaken. This information may be available in the social work care template but should be updated as necessary.

s) Information about the child’s parents and other significant people. This section should be shared with the parent. Each parent should be given the opportunity to comment on the accuracy of the information included about them in the report using the forms following page 15.

Set out how the birth father acquired PR, e.g. by marriage to the birth mother, registration on the birth certificate (after 1 December 2003), a parental responsibility agreement with the birth mother or a parental responsibility order.

If there are any issues relating to the birth parents’ immigration status, state whether legal advice has been sought and set out advice received.

t) Relevant information should be summarised for this section. This will include the parents’ own experience of being parented, patterns of relationships and any care history. Care should be taken when naming individuals, for example, mother’s former partners, where these have no relationship to this child. First names or initials should be used where necessary. Where information is not available, state why not and the efforts made to obtain it. This section should include the birth of any other children of this parent. It should highlight significant events and dates where known but not duplicate detailed information from elsewhere in the report.

There will be a need to update information in this section where additional information becomes available after the initial completion of this report, e.g. following care and placement order proceedings or after birth parent counselling.

u) Siblings and half-siblings. Every sibling and half-sibling listed on the family tree/structure should be included. Where information is incomplete, state why and the efforts taken to obtain it. Surnames should be withheld where necessary (e.g. where the child is adopted) and birth names, not adopted names, should be used. Where the child is placed elsewhere, e.g. previously adopted, relevant information may be sourced from previous case files or current post-adoption support teams. Include the outcome of sibling assessments, and where a decision has been made to place children separately, give clear reasons for the decision so that the adopters and the child can understand why the decision was made.

v) Other significant people may include step-parents/grandparents/other relatives who have had care of the child. Anyone who holds parental responsibility should be included. Whether an individual is “significant” should be assessed on a case-by-case basis, seeking input from the child through direct work, using ecomaps or genograms where appropriate. Set out how the parental responsibility has been obtained, i.e. through a residence order, special guardianship order, parental responsibility agreement entered into by a step-parent with a birth parent, parental responsibility order to step-parent, or being appointed as a legal guardian after a parent’s death.

w) Proposed contact arrangements. This should reflect the care plan and include consideration of the likelihood of any existing relationship continuing and the value to the child of it doing so. Include the proposals for any reduction in contact between the final hearing and match. Any changes to the contact plan made after the CPR is first written, e.g. at the point of the care order or placement order, should be included. At the matching stage thought will need to be given to whether an order under section 51a of the ACA 2002 may be needed when an adoption order is being applied for. The support plan should detail how contact plans are to be supported. Further information can be found in Statutory Adoption Guidance, Chapter 5 on contact.2

x) The chronology of decisions and actions taken by the agency relates to key decisions and actions in relation to the adoption plan. This should include dates of key review decisions, care planning meetings, family group conferences and professional meetings where the adoption plan was progressed, rather than every meeting or contact. Important decisions, such as to place siblings together or apart, considering or ruling out family members or foster carers wishing to adopt, should be recorded. Dates of notifications sent to birth parents and when independent support was offered should also be included.

y) Ability and willingness to permanently care for a child

The social worker should bear in mind the relevant requirements of the welfare checklist ACA 2002 s1(4) as set out below:

1 Considerations applying to the exercise of powers

(1) This section applies whenever a court or adoption agency is coming to a decision relating to the adoption of a child.

(2) The paramount consideration of the court or adoption agency must be the child’s welfare, throughout his life…

(f) the relationship which the child has with relatives, and with any other person in relation to whom the court or agency considers the relationship to be relevant, including—

(i) the likelihood of any such relationship continuing and the value to the child of its doing so,

(ii) the ability and willingness of any of the child’s relatives, or of any such person, to provide the child with a secure environment in which the child can develop, and otherwise to meet the child’s needs,

(iii) the wishes and feelings of any of the child’s relatives, or of any such person, regarding the child.

Complete a separate sheet for each individual who has been approached or who has approached the agency with a view to offering a permanent placement for the child, including their birth parents. Assessments of family members will be available to the court as part of the evidence submitted. This section does not need to replicate these assessments but should provide a brief summary of the analysis and conclusions.
z) Where the reasons for considering that adoption would be in the best interests of the child rely, in part, on expert opinion, the outcome of the assessment should be summarised. The full reports should be available to the agency decision-maker but will only be available to the prospective adopters with leave of the court.

Social workers should be aware of the need to be compliant with the ruling in re BS and use the information gathered and analysed in the social work care template shown below to inform the report.



Table of realistic placement options

First realistic option:




Factors in favour

Factors against







Second realistic option:




Factors in favour

Factors against





Third realistic option:




Factors in favour

Factors against










Reason why adoption is the preferred and proposed placement option





Birth parent’s views:

Wherever possible, and if the agency considers it appropriate, this record should be completed by the birth mother or father in their own words. It may be used as an important source of information for the agency in making its decisions and, when and where appropriate, for the child and the adoptive parents in understanding the child’s background. It is important that the birth mother and father understand the importance of these questions and the reasons why they are being asked. The form should be used wherever possible within the context of a counselling interview(s) (required in Regulation 14, AAR 2005).



These forms could be revisited and updated at later points after the care proceedings, before matching or the adoption order application if the birth parents have been helped to make further contributions or changed their views.
The information gathered from the forms should then be included in the main report and a copy of the forms placed on the child’s adoption file.

VIEWS OF THE BIRTH MOTHER ON THE CHILD’S PERMANENCE REPORT

Your name:





The name of your child:




I have been shown the details about me as recorded in my child’s permanence report

YES/NO

I agree with what has been written

YES/NO

I would like to add the following information




I disagree with what has been written in my child’s permanence report for the following reasons




(Any additional comments should be recorded separately and signed and dated)

I have been given written information about the adoption process

YES/NO

I have been offered/had independent counselling to support me in understanding why adoption is the local authority’s preferred plan for my child

YES/NO

You may want to seek advice and support from somebody who is experienced in adoption matters and who can help you with this. It is also important for you to understand that, whilst the adoption agency must take into account your wishes or feelings, the agency and the adoptive parents cannot be required to follow them.



What things would you like your child/children and the adopters to know about your childhood and the way that it has influenced you? In time, it will be very important for your child to have a better understanding of your life. This will be easier if he or she has a picture of both the good things and the difficult experiences you may have had whilst growing up.




Do you have any wishes or feelings about your child/children in relation to the plan to place them for adoption?




Do you have any wishes or feelings about your child/children in relation to their future religious or cultural upbringing?




Are there any other comments you would like to make about the way in which you would like your child/children to be brought up in their adoptive family?




Signature:




Date:





VIEWS OF THE BIRTH FATHER ON THE CHILD’S PERMANENCE REPORT

Your name:


The name of your child:





I have been shown the details about me as recorded in my child’s permanence report

YES/NO

I agree with what has been written

YES/NO

I would like to add the following information




I disagree with what has been written in my child’s permanence report for the following reasons




(Any additional comments should be recorded separately and signed and dated)

I have been given written information about the adoption process

YES/NO

I have been offered/had independent counselling to support me in understanding why adoption is the local authority’s preferred plan for my child

YES/NO

You may want to seek advice and support from somebody who is experienced in adoption matters and who can help you with this. It is also important for you to understand that, whilst the adoption agency must take into account your wishes or feelings, the agency and the adoptive parents cannot be required to follow them.

What things would you like your child/children and the adopters to know about your childhood and the way that it has influenced you? In time, it will be very important for your child to have a better understanding of your life. This will be easier if he or she has a picture of both the good things and the difficult experiences you may have had whilst growing up.





Do you have any wishes or feelings about your child/children in relation to the plan to place them for adoption?




Do you have any wishes or feelings about your child/children in relation to their future religious or cultural upbringing?




Are there any other comments you would like to make about the way in which you would like your child/children to be brought up in their adoptive family?




Signature:




Date:





CHILD’S WISHES AND FEELINGS

CHILD’S NAME:




DATE COMPLETED





Your social worker will have talked to you about adoption. They should have told you what this means. They should also have told you what they are going to do to find your adoptive family.

If you feel that you still do not understand what adoption means, you should ask to be told again until you feel that you understand.

It is very important for the adults who are making decisions about this to understand what you think and feel about adoption.


You may want to write what you think about adoption in your own words. You can do this below. You may want an adult to write this for you. You might have lots to say. You may have very little to say. It is up to you, but whether it is a lot or a little, it is always very important. You can use extra paper if you like.


What I think about being adopted




What I think I want my adoptive family to be like





Here are some other important things that you may want to say something about.

You may go to a church, temple or mosque. You may say prayers. If this is so, it is important that social workers know about this so that your adoptive parents know about this too.




Do you go to a church, temple or mosque or say prayers?




Do you want to say any more about this?



There are lots of important things about you. These might include the place where you were born or have lived, the festivals or celebrations you like, the clothes you wear, the kinds of people you like to be with, the food you like or the food you don’t like or don’t eat.


It will be very important to make sure that your adoptive parents know these things about you. Ask somebody who knows you well to think about how you might write some of this down.

These are the important things I want people to know about me




After you are adopted, it may be possible for you to stay in touch with people who are very important to you now. Your social worker can explain how this can happen.


You may want to say something about each of these people and how you want to stay in touch with them. If you want somebody else to help you do this, you can ask them.


These are the people I want to stay in touch with







1 www.education.gov.uk/consultations/downloadableDocs/170214%20Adoption%20Statutory%20Guidance.docx

2 http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/pdf/s/adoption%20statutory%20guidance%202013%20final%20version.pdf

© BAAF 2014

All rights reserved. Except as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, this form may not be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission of the publishers. A Licence Agreement permitting electronic reproduction of this form can be purchased from BAAF.


Published by BAAF, Saffron House, 6-10 Kirby Street, London EC1N 8TS.




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