Choate vegetation management project


Gomphus quadricolor Rapids Clubtail Regional Forester's Sensitive/Michigan Special Concern S2S3



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Gomphus quadricolor Rapids Clubtail Regional Forester's Sensitive/Michigan Special Concern S2S3


A smallish, 42- 44 mm., total length, dragonfly with a contrasting black and green color pattern. It has a dark band across the face and a short pterostigma (colored cell on leading edge of wings near tip). Abdomen is black with a series of yellow streaks down the middle (Walker 1958). Larvae are typical of the genus Gomphus, elongate and flattened with burrowing hooks on the first and second pairs of legs. Their main habitats are large streams and rivers with rocky bottoms on unproductive soils (NatureServe 2001). The adults show a preference for rapids, hence the name, where they perch on rocks in the stream (Dunkle 2000). Larvae can be found in pools below rapids where they would be found burrowing in softer sediments, such as sand or mud. (Walker 1958). They are distributed across the United States from Maine to Minnesota and north into Ontario (NatureServe 2001). There are only a few records of this species from Michigan and none from the Upper Peninsula. One record from Benzie County in the northern Lower Peninsula occurred in a Jack Pine plain (Michigan Odonata Survey 2001). A Forest-wide survey (7/12/01-7/18/01) found one individual at… The larval period is probably 2-3 years. The flight season is from early May or June to mid-July (Dunkle 2000).
There is potential habitat present; this species will be analyzed further.

Lycaeides idas nabokovi Nabokov's or Northern Blue Butterfly

This species is only known from the Upper Peninsula and Isle Royale. The northern blue is found primarily on rock outcrops or in open barrens that contain its larval food plant, the state-threatened dwarf bilberry (Evers 1962). Based on plant survey results, the project area does not contain any dwarf bilberry and therefore is not suitable habitat for the northern blue. Therefore, there would be no direct, indirect, or cumulative effects to northern blue butterflies from this project, and there will be no further analysis for the northern blue butterfly. There will be no risk assessment or determination completed for this species.


Ophiogomphus anomalus Extra-striped Snaketail Michigan Special Concern S1


Smallish, 43-46 mm total length, and slender, the thorax is green and heavily striped with black. These stripes form an interrupted N shaped black mark on the side of the thorax. The abdomen is black with some yellow markings. The head and face are green with black lines across the face (Needham et al 2000, Walker 1958, NatureServe 2001). The larvae are typical for their Genus with strongly divergent wing pads. They differ by having a fourth antennal segment that completely caps the third unlike other members of the Genus where the fourth antennal segment is much is much smaller and conical (Walker 1958). Preferred habitat is clear, rapid, moderate gradient, medium to large rivers with very good water quality. Larvae prefer shallow (< 1 m) erosional areas such as riffles. They can be found in sand, gravel, or cobble (Walker 1958, NatureServe 2001). Adults spend much of their time in treetops far from water (Dunkle 2000). This is a northeastern species found from Maine to Minnesota with Pennsylvania being the southern extent of its range (NatureServe 2001). In Canada it is found from Nova Scotia to Ontario (Walker 1958). There is one recorded occurrence of this dragonfly on the Forest in the Presque Isle River watershed in Gogebic County. There are several other occurrences in Iron County near the Ottawa (Michigan Odonata Survey 2001). They have also been found in the Chequamegon-Nicolet Forest. The larval period is probably more than one year. The flight season is from early June to early August (NatureServe 2001, Needham et al 2000).
There is potential habitat present; this species will be analyzed further.

Ophiogomphus howei Pygmy Snaketail Michigan Special Concern S1

The smallest member of the Genus is stocky, measuring 33 mm in total length (NatureServe 2001). It has an olive green thorax, striped with brown. The abdomen is black with bright yellow markings. Head and face are yellowish-green. Hind wings with yellow tint in basal half (Needham et al 2000). The larvae have the characteristic divergent wing pads of Ophiogomphus but are small in size and lack dorsal abdominal spines. They have rather specific habitat requirements. They prefer large rivers with strong current and gravel/sand bottoms (Dunkle 2000). The gradient need not be high. The larval preferred microhabitat is near rapids or surface breaking objects such as rocks or wood. The larvae can be found in the interstices between cobbles so they would be difficult to collect. The adults spend much of their time in the tops of trees (NatureServe 2001), and forage in treetops along the sides of river valleys (Dunkle 2000). This should be born in mind when making management decisions. Their distribution is eastern ranging from Maine to Minnesota and south to Tennessee and North Carolina. There have been no recorded occurrences of this species on the Forest but it has been found on the Chequamegon-Nicolet Forest. The larval period is probably more than one year in northern climates. The flight season is very early from early-late April to early-late June depending on latitude (NatureServe 2001, Dunkle 2000).
There is potential habitat present; this species will be analyzed further.

Somatochlora forcipata Forcipate Emerald Dragonfly

This species is small (43.5 – 50.8 mm. total length), with thorax is dark reddish-brown with metallic green and blue reflections and is thickly covered with brownish hairs. There are two yellow spots on the sides of the thorax, the first being larger than the second. The abdomen is greenish-black and of average length. The wings are transparent with some yellow near the base. The larvae are uniformly dark brown and very hairy (Walker and Corbet 1975, Needham et al 2000). This is a northeastern species, being found from Labrador and Newfoundland to Alberta, south to Pennsylvania. It has rarely been found west of Ontario (Walker and Corbet 1975). This species is widespread across the Upper Peninsula and there is one record of it being found on the Forest, in the Sylvania Wilderness (Michigan Odonata Survey 2000). S
. forcipata’s habitat is small woodland streams and ponds (Needham et al 2000) or small, boggy spring-fed streams, and alder swamps (Dunkle 2000). Adults can be found in sunny openings, using the forest as a refuge when disturbed (Walker and Corbet 1975). The larvae of the Genus Somatochlora are sprawlers, which means they live at the substrates surface or hidden amidst debris (Corbet 1999). They would require a microhabitat that contains some organic matter to hide in, such as depositional areas. Their diet is very broad and includes any animal small enough to capture and ingest. S. forcipata’s flight season is from late May to late August (Needham et al 2000). At this latitude, the larvae probably have a multi-year lifecycle (Corbet p.224-225).
There is potential habitat present; this species will be analyzed further.




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