Cips lesson “Example”



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CIPS Lesson “Example”



Unit Overview (Teacher's Guide only)

Includes targeted benchmark ideas for unit; how taught in each cycle.


II.1 Prerequisite Knowledge/Skills

II.2 Alerting Teachers to Commonly Held Ideas

I.3 Justifying Activity Sequence
Cycle Overview (Teacher's Guide only)

Includes prerequisite knowledge/skills, targeted benchmark ideas for cycle; commonly held student ideas, how ideas are taught in cycle.


Unit/Cycle Introduction

Story line to motivate learning of targeted benchmark ideas.


I.1 Conveying Unit Purpose
Our Initial Ideas (Elicitation of Student's ideas related to targeted Benchmark ideas)
Purpose

Relates cycle key question to story line


I.1 Conveying Cycle Purpose

I.2 Conveying Lesson Purpose



We think . . .

Problem (describe, explain or predict) posed about situation(s) or event(s).

Partners or teams discuss and write down their ideas (and reasons).
II.3 Assisting Teacher in Identification of Own Students' Ideas

V.2 Encouraging Students to Explain Their Ideas


Explore Your Ideas

Teams do an experiment (or participate in class demonstration). They discuss their ideas about questions posed and write/draw ideas on a presentation board.

II.4 Addressing Students' Commonly Held Ideas

III.1 Providing Variety of Phenomena

III.2 Providing Vivid Experiences

Our Class Ideas

Teams present ideas to class. Class members ask clarifying questions. Teacher helps summarize Class Initial Ideas.


V.2 Encouraging Students to Explain Their Ideas
Developing Our Ideas - Constructing Type
Purpose

Review of what has been learned so far and key question of what needs to be learned next.


I.2 Conveying Lesson Purpose
We think . . .

Elicits students ideas about relevant situation(s) or event(s) related to targeted benchmark idea


II.3 Assisting Teacher in Identification of Own Students' Ideas

V.1 Encouraging Students to Explain Their Ideas


Explore Your Ideas

Students explore situation(s) or event(s) through hands-on activity, class demonstration(s), or consideration of known every day event(s).


II.4 Addressing Students' Commonly Held Ideas

III.1 Providing Variety of Phenomena

III.2 Providing Vivid Experiences

IV.2 Representing Ideas Effectively


Make Sense of Your Ideas

Series of questions to help students relate observations to targeted benchmark idea.


V.1 Encouraging Students to Explain Their Ideas

V.2 Guiding Interpretation and Reasoning

Reflect on Your Ideas (not every lesson)

Writing activity for students to reflect on what they have learned.

V.3 Encouraging Students to Think About What They Have Learned
Developing Our Ideas - Presenting Type
Purpose

Review of what has been learned so far and key question of what needs to be learned next.


I.2 Conveying Lesson Purpose
Introduction to Targeted Benchmark Idea

Reading, demonstrations, and class discussion of targeted benchmark idea.


III.1 Providing Variety of Phenomena

V.2 Guiding Interpretation and Reasoning

IV.2 Representing Ideas Effectively
You Try It!

Students explore additional situations and events not used to present the idea.


III.2 Providing Vivid Experiences

IV.1 Encouraging Students to Explain Their Ideas

IV.4 Providing Practice
Reflect on Your Ideas (not every activity)

Writing activity for students to reflect on what they have learned.


V.3 Encouraging Students to Think About What They Have Learned
Putting It All Together (summarize benchmark ideas learned, introduce how to use ideas)
Consensus Ideas

Compare ideas learned with class initial ideas.


V.3 Encouraging Students to Think About What They Have Learned

How Do Scientists Represent These Ideas

Reading/discussion of technical terms for targeted benchmark ideas.

IV.1 Introducing Terms Meaningfully
How Do Scientists Use These Ideas

Reading and/or teacher modeling of how to use benchmark ideas to solve original problem posed in Our Initial Ideas lesson.


IV.3 Demonstrating Use of Knowledge
You Try It!

Guided (scaffolded) practice of using benchmark ideas to solve part of original problem or very similar problem.


IV.4 Providing Practice
Idea Power! (students apply what they have learned to solve at least two problems)
Situation and Problem Statement

Problem statement in form: Use your consensus ideas to describe (or explain, or predict) something about real-world situation or event.


IV.4 Providing Practice

V.3 Encouraging Students to Think About What They Have Learned


Solution (includes evaluating solution)

Sometimes involves experiment. Students follow four-step problem solving strategy to solve problem.


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