Co-ordinator: Dr Stephen Bygrave cp value: 30 ects value



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English Discipline Courses

Year 2 – Semester 1



English Discipline Courses

Year 2
SEMESTER 1
Double Units
ENGL2005 ROMANTICISM 
Semester 1
2 Units 
Co-ordinator: Dr Stephen Bygrave
CP value: 30
ECTS value: 15
Available as an Alternative Subject: yes (subject to availability of spaces)
Aims and Objectives: This course is an introduction to Romanticism and to Romantic writing in Britain. It introduces you to a range of fictional, poetic, and other texts from a period - roughly 1780-1830 - often described as 'Romantic', developing your ability to interpret these texts in the light of their specific contexts. The course examines how revolution can be written about, the effects of the making of a reading public, the extension of authorship to women and working-class writers, a separation of cultural from political power, the fetishisation of poetry and the figure of the poet in Romantic aesthetics. We will examine Romanticism as a cultural phenomenon, asking whether 'Romanticism' in other fields and in other countries can be said to be the 'same' phenomenon as within British writing, whether this is an adequate description of those writings, and whether 'Romantic ideology' persists into the present.

Content: We will study canonical Romantic poems by Coleridge, Wordsworth and Byron, as well as poems by women and by working-class writers, De Quincey's visionary prose, and two novels: Jane Austen's Persuasion, and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.

Learning and Teaching Methods: Texts are taught in roughly chronological order, broadly alternating sessions on poetry and prose. Lectures provide a critical and historical context for the detailed discussion of individual texts to take place in seminars. You will have one double-length lecture and one double-length seminar per week, except for Weeks 6 and 12, which are set aside for individual consultations and feedback on essays.
Method of Assessment: The course is assessed by an essay of 3000 words, a 3000-word course journal edited from entries you have made in preparation for each class and concentrating on how your response to particular texts developed as the course progressed (37.5% each), and a final two-hour exam (25%).
Set texts
Duncan Wu (ed.), Romanticism: An Anthology, third edition (Oxford: Blackwell, 2005), ISBN: 1405120851£19.99
Jane Austen, Persuasion (Penguin or World's Classics)
Thomas De Quincey, Confessions of an English Opium Eater and Other Writings, ed. Grevel Lindop (Oxford University Press, Oxford 1996)
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, 1818 text, ed. Marilyn Butler (World's Classics 0-19-282283-7)
ENGL2008 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Semester 1
2 Units 
Co-ordinator: To be confirmed
CP Value: 30
ECTS value: 15

Available as an Alternative Subject if spaces are available. 

This unit will introduce the practice of 'creative' writing through a study of the compositional requirements of the contemporary short story. This is very much a practice-based unit that requires lots of writing, although you will also be expected to read as widely as possible in contemporary short fiction. Seminars will be run as workshops: you will be expected to bring along your own writing and discuss it with the group. It is not necessary to have written fiction before. We will refer to The Creative Writing Coursebook, ed. Julia Bell and Paul Magrs, and an anthology of short fiction.


ENGL2010 POSTCOLONIAL TEXTS AND CONTEXTS
Semester 1
2 units
Co-ordinator:
Dr. Sujala Singh
CP Value:
30
ECTS Value
15
Available as an Alternative Subject:
yes, if space available
Pre-requisite:
none
Aims and Objectives:
This course introduces you to postcolonial literatures from Africa, the Caribbean and the Indian sub-continent. It provides an introduction to literatures categorised as "other" or "marginal," while encouraging you to think of the problematic ways in which norms and centres get defined and instituted. Through an interdisciplinary approach, the course will encourage you to think of the politics of reading and writing and your own investment in interpreting literatures of "difference." 

Content:
The course will set up key debates within postcolonial studies through the works of theorists such as Frantz Fanon, Gayatri Spivak, Edward Said, Mary Louise Pratt and Edward Kamau Braithwaite among others. These discussions will provide a framework for reading fiction by writers such as Sam Selvon, J.M. Coetzee, Maryse Conde, Amitav Ghosh and Erna Brodber.

Learning and Teaching Methods: The course consists of a double lecture and a double seminar each week. The lectures will set up the historical and theoretical frameworks crucial for an understanding of the literary text prescribed for the week. Seminar discussions will then focus on detailed readings of postcolonial literatures in relation to literary criteria such as genre and style, but also the importance of where one reads from and how this influences the "value" of what one reads.
Method of Assessment:
two 3000-word essays, equally weighted at 37.5%, and one exam (25%) .


ENGL2051 MODERNISM
Semester 1
2 units
Co-ordinator:
To be confirmed
CP Value:
30
ECTS Value
15
Available as an Alternative Subject:
yes, if space available
Pre-requisite:
none

This course will provide an introduction to modernism in literature, examining the racial and sexual politics of the modernist cultural project. It is a paradox of literary modernism that the radical innovation and iconoclasm of many modernist writers was accompanied by a reactionary masculinist (and in some cases explicitly fascist) politics. Writers referred to in this context (although not necessarily as part of the set reading) include T.S. Eliot, D.H. Lawrence, Wyndham Lewis, Ezra Pound and W.B. Yeats. Those writers that countered this fascist potential within modernism include Franz Kafka, James Joyce, Dorothy Richardson, Djuna Barnes and Virginia Woolf and these will also be explored in terms of an alternative libertarian potential within modernism which countered the fascism of many of its exponents.

Primary texts may include
Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness (1899)

W.B. Yeats, Selected Poetry

Franz Kafka, The Trial (1925)

T.S. Eliot, Selected Poems

Djuna Barnes, Nightwood (1936)

Virginia Woolf, Three Guineas and A Room of One's Own (1938 and 1929)

James Joyce, Ulysses (1922)

Aldous Huxley, Brave New World (1932)



Battleship Potemkin (dir. Sergei Eisenstein, 1925)
Suggested background reading

Zygmunt Bauman, Modernity and Ambivalence (1990)

Robert Casillo, The Genealogy of Demons: Anti-Semitism, Fascism, and the Myths of Ezra Pound (1988)

Peter Childs, Modernism (2000)

Maud Ellmann, The Poetics of Impersonality: T.S. Eliot and Ezra Pound (1987)

Michael Levenson, A Genealogy of Modernism (1984)

Eugene Lunn, Marxism and Modernism (1985)

Bonnie Kime Scott, ed., The Gender of Modernism (1990)

Marilyn Reizbaum, James Joyce's Judaic Other (1999)

Christopher Ricks, T.S. Eliot and Prejudice (1988)

Ronald Taylor (ed.), Aesthetics and Politics (1977)


Year 2
SEMESTER 1
Single Units
ENGL2011 WOMEN, WRITING AND MODERNITY IN BRITAIN 1790-1865
1 Unit | Semester 1 
Co-ordinator: Professor Emma Clery
CP value: 15
ECTS value: 7.5
Available as an Alternative Subject: yes (subject to availability of spaces)
Aims and Objectives: The course will ask students to consider the articulation of modernity across and within literary genres as they address the changing definitions of gender and sexuality, of sensibility and sentiment, of social hierarchy and race, of marriage, family, nation, public and private, consumption and production. The course will show how these issues are related to wider aesthetic shifts, and it will suggest that debates about subjectivity in women's writing offered not only progressive but also conservative versions of modernity. 
Content: The course provides an opportunity to learn about a particularly vital and tumultuous period in the history of women's writing and of women's engagement in the shaping of the modern world. It encompasses the agitation against slavery, the response to the French Revolution, and to the prolonged period of war that followed. Throughout, women took a prominent role and it was in part their assumption of a public voice during these critical debates that generated the ideas leading to modern feminism, most famously put forward by Mary Wollstonecraft.

Learning and Teaching methods: One lecture and one seminar per week. Knowledge and understanding will be developed through your attendance at lectures, your independent study, and your involvement in seminars. Informal presentations will allow you to enhance your oral communication skills, to work as part of a team, and to obtain feedback from the group and the tutor. Seminar and small group discussions will promote intellectual skills, such as detailed critical analysis of texts and more wide-ranging consideration of literary genres, political issues, and theoretical concepts. Assessment in the form of two essays is designed to encourage you to focus on improving writing skills, close reading, and the construction of arguments, with opportunities for discussing essay plans and obtaining feedback. A visit to the Chawton Library and Study Centre will lead to an understanding of the broad context of research in women's writing and the use of scholarly archives. 

Method of Assessment: 2x2000-word essays, equally weighted.
Reading list
Primary Texts include: Women in the Eighteenth Century: Constructions of Femininity, ed. Vivien Jones (London: Routledge, 1990); Romantic Women Poets: An Anthology, ed. Duncan Wu (Oxford: Blackwell, 1997) OR Romanticism: An Anthology, ed. Duncan Wu, 3rd edn (Oxford: Blackwell, 2005); Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792) ed. Carol H. Poston (New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 1988); Amelia Opie, Adeline Mowbray, ed. Shelley King and John B. Pierce (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999); Jane Austen, Mansfield Park, ed. Claudia L. Johnson, Norton Critical Edition (New York: W.W. Norton, 1998). 

ENGL2018 IMAGES OF KNIGHTHOOD
1 Unit | Semester 1
Convenor: Dr Bella Millett
CP value: 15
ECTS value: 7.5
Available as an Alternative Subject: yes, if spare places available
Pre-requisite: none
Aims and Objectives: to introduce you to a wide variety of representations (both medieval and later) of the knightly ideal; to give you an understanding of its historical development; and to increase your awareness of the complex interaction between genre and historical context in the representation of this ideal.

Content: The course examines a variety of literary (in the broadest sense) and cinematic representations of chivalry, from the Norman Conquest to the 21st century; its main focus, however, is on the medieval period, with particular emphasis on C14-C15 Middle English literature. It examines the ways in which representations of knighthood are modified by the specific social and cultural context of the works which contain them; and also looks at some later re-readings, and re-writings, of medieval representations of knighthood, and the way in which these too are determined by their cultural and historical context.

Learning and teaching methods: 1 lecture and one seminar per week, with additional material on video / DVD. These will be backed up by the course website, http://www.knighthood.soton.ac.uk/, which is linked to a Blackboard site used mainly for announcements and course documentation; email (via Blackboard) will be used to answer student queries, for feedback, and for circulating regular seminar agendas. The lectures will concentrate on the broader historical and cultural background of the works discussed; the seminars will analyse them in detail. One lecture will be replaced by extended individual feedback sessions on your first essay.
Method of assessment: 2 x 2,000-word essays.
Basic reading: The Song of Roland, tr. Glyn Burgess (Penguin Classics); Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, ed. and trans. W. R. J. Barron (Manchester: Manchester UP, 1974); Sir Thomas Malory: Le Morte d'Arthur, ed. Helen Cooper (Oxford UP). For the genuinely poverty-stricken, there are multiple copies of the first two in the Library (though you may have to share them). The standard account of the knightly ideal, which you are strongly recommended -- though not required -- to buy, is Maurice Keen's Chivalry (Yale University Press). Other texts will be available as photocopies or through the course website.
ENGL2029 Drama since WWII



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