Collection of Legends, Myths, Fairy Tales Comenius, 2014 Comenius project

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Collection of Legends, Myths,

Fairy Tales

Comenius, 2014

Comenius project

Celebrating EUROPE: Culture and Traditions

(2013-2015)

This book summarizes the myths, legends and tales of the participating countries. Translations into English and drawings are made ​​by students.

Content:


  1. Pikavere Lasteaed-Algkool – Estonia ……………………………………………… 3

  2. Grundschule Gießelhorst and Grundschule Sustrum – Germany…. 8

  3. 6/ΘΕΣΙΟ ΟΛΟΗΜΕΡΟ ΔΗΜΟΤΙΚΟ ΣΧΟΛΕΙΟ ΧΙΛΙΟΔΕΝΔΡΟΥ – Greece ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 17

  4. Knock National School – Ireland ……………………………………………………. 20

  5. Agenzia Nazionale LLP Italia Via Magliabecchi, 1 50122-FIRENZE – Italy …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 25

  6. Ventspils 5.vidusskola – Latvia ………………………………………………………. 27

  7. Dysjaland skule – Norway ………………………………………………………………… 31

  8. Základná škola s materskou školou v Babíne – Slovakia …………….. 35

  9. CEIP JARAMA – Spain ……………………………………………………………………


Kalev’s son (Kalevipoeg)

Linda and Kalev lived in Taara’s oak forest in Kalev’ s farm. They had three sons. Before the last son was born, Kalev died. Linda buried Kalev She brought a lot of rocks on the grave. The grave is now know as Toompea hill. Linda mourned Kalev for 7 days and 7 nights. She sat on a rock and cried. Her tears created lake Ülemiste. Before Kalev died, he said that one of his sons will become a new king.

The sons lived calmly until one day Finnish sorcerer kidnapped Linda. The sons looked for their mother, but couldn’t find her. Two older brothers went to sleep because they thought maybe in their dreams they could see where their mother was. The youngest son, Kalevipoeg, went to search for Linda. He wandered for a long time but couldn’t find her. Then he swam to Finland. In Finland he sat on a rock to rest and then fell asleep. When he woke up he rushed to the Finnish sorcerer’s farm. He fought with sorcerer’s warriors and won the battle. The sorcerer pegged for forgiveness and told Kalevipoeg about Linda. After that Kalevipoeg killed the Finnish sorcerer. He searched for his mother everywhere. Only in the morning he understood, that his mother Linda had died and is in hell. For two days he mourned. Then he wandered towards the sea.

While on his way, he met a blacksmith from whom he got a sword that Kalev had ordered earlier. Kalevipoeg invited the blacksmith back to Estonia to get his money. But while being there, Kalevipoeg drank too much and killed the blacksmith’s son. As a revenge the blacksmith put a spell on the sword. Kalevipoeg rowed a boat over the sea. When he arrived home, he and his brothers sat down and talked about their journeys. The eldest son then said that one of them has to become a king. They decided to compete with each other. The one who could throw a rock farther, would become a king. Kalevipoeg became a king. Older brothers went abroad to search for their own luck.

The next day Kaevipoeg and his cousin Alevipoeg had to help to solve a conflict between a pair of demons arguing over a bog. Kalevipoeg and Alevipoeg said that the bog had to be divided into two parts. One of the demons was not happy with their idea. Alevipoeg made an offer to the demon. If the demon would fill his hat with money, they would leave. Alevipoeg and Kalevipoeg dug a hole under the hat so the demon couldn’t fill the hat with money. They tricked the demon out of his riches.

Kalevipoeg was reminded about the Finnish blackwmith and his money owing. He asked Alevipoeg to take care of it. He wanted to go to lake Peipus to bring some laths and beams to build cities. Before that he fell asleep. While he slept, the air-maid lost her ring into a well. She weeped. Kalevipoeg then jumped in to the well to search the ring. But Finnish sorcerer’s helpers had followed Kalevipoeg and they threw a big rock in to the well to drown Kaelvipoeg. But a bit later Kalevipoeg came out of the well with a ring in his hands.

Then Kalevipoeg started his journey to the other side of lake Peipus. He didn’t have a boat and had to cross the lake on foot. While in water the sorcerer’s helpers tried to stop him once more but with no success. On the other side of the lake he fell asleep again. One of the sorcerer’s helpers took Kalevipoeg’s sword. When he tried to run away, the sword fell in to Kääpa river. Kalevipoeg started to look for his sword. He found it but couldn’t get it out from the ground. He told the sword: „ If somebody who has carried you before goes trough the water, cut his legs off.“ After that Kalevipoeg went back home with his laths and beams. He had to fight sorcerer’s helpers once more but he was still stronger. But still he had to go back behind lake Peipus for new beams, because he had split all of them in a fight.

Kalevipoeg saw some smoke. Three demons boiled some broth in a cave. He saw a door in a cave and heard some girls singing. The girls recognized Kalevipoeg from old stories. Kalevipoeg and the maidens talked. He found out that the girls were prisioners and they were kept in a cave by the horned devil called Sarviktaat. The girls had to serve the horned devil. Kalevipoeg promised to free them from the devil and find them husbands. The girls showed Kalevipoeg around. Room made of iron belonged to the demon. That was where he worked. Room made of copper belonged to the girls. The silver room was the demon’s livingroom and the golden room was for special events.

When the horned devil arrived home, Kalevipoed fought him and won the battle. He took the girls, some gold, a sword, and a magic hat with him. Horded devil’s cousin tried to follow them but one of the girls enchanted a sea behind them. Finally Kalevipoeg made it back home. There he met Olevipoeg, Sulevipoeg and Alevipoeg, who helped him build. Olevipoeg, Sulevipoeg and Alevipoeg married the girls Kalevipoeg had saved.

Kalevipoeg wanted to travel to the edge of the world. He built a silver boat for himself. He called it „Lennuk“ (Aeroplane). Early in the morning he started his journey and after a week he reached land again. He later found out he had reached Lapu. As he wandered around he found the house of wiseman of Lapu. He told Kalevipoeg not to go to islands of Sparks, but Kalevipoeg didn’t like this idea.

Kalevipoeg went on the island. Later when he left, some of his friends decided to stay on the island. Kalevipoeg sent some of his helpers to find out why everybody wanted to stay there. All the others on the silver ship fell asleep. They were awaken by a giant lady. She put them in to her apron and took them home. At home, giant lady’s father told her to take the men back. When they were back on the ship they sailed to the north. They saw some animals that looked like dogs. They were mean and Kalevipoeg had to fight them. After that Kalevipoeg sailed back home.

The next day Kalevipoeg found himself from the entrance of hell. He wanted to go to a real hell to search for the horned devil and Linda. On his way he had to go trough many obstacles. But Kalevipoeg got pass them by ringing the golden bell. Then the horned devil sent his army to face Kalevipoeg. They had a fight but Kalevipoeg was still stronger than them. Finally Kalevipoeg made it behind the gates of hell. Once again Kalevipoeg had to fight the horned devil’s army. Then he broke in to the demons house where he saw Lindas ghost. Linda told him to handcuff the devil on a cliff. This meant he had finally won the devil. As a reward Kalevipoeg got bags full of gold.

After a long period of calm days back on earth, war broke loose. Kalevipoeg called his men to fight with the enemy. They fought until the enemies fled. After that Kalevipoeg wanted to cross Võhandu river. He built a bridge over it. But the war followed him. A new war started on the other side. It lasted for seven days. Many men from Kalevipoeg’s army died. Kalevipoeg was tired and broken but still managed to win the war. Later Kalevipoeg, Alevipoeg and Olevipoeg went to search for water. They found a lake but Alevipoeg fell into the lake and drowned. Kalevipoeg was very sad. He decided to name Olevipoeg as a new king and then he left.

He settled down by the Koiva river. He was disturbed by many people but he managed to make them leave. But still he decided to leave. Then he found himself by the Kääpa river. He was reminded by his sword and the words he said back when he brought laths from Lake Peipus. It was just before the sword cut off his legs and Kalevipoeg died.

Kalevipoeg went to heaven where he saw his grandfather. He wanted Kalevipoeg to go and guard the gates of hell. Kalevipoeg had to make sure the horned devil wouldn’t get out. He accidentally got his hand stucked in the cliff and now when our land is shaking and the sea is raging we know that it is because Kalevipoeg is trying to get his hand out from the cliff.


De Bremer Stadtmuskanten

eenKortjan na eenVörlaag van ‚n Klett-Verlag, München 1994



  1. Up’nBuernhoff

Esel: Ikbün de EselLangohr, i-a, i-a.

Buer: Gah weg! Du bust mi tooolt.

Esel: Ikgah na Bremen. Ikmaak Musik.
Hund: Ikbün de Hund Packan, wau, wau.

Buer: Gah weg! Du büst mi tooolt.

Esel: Kaam mit!

Esel un Hund: Wigaht na Bremen. Wimaakt Musik.


Katt: Ikbün de KattBartputzer, miau, miau.

Buer: Gah weg! Du büst mi tooolt.

Esel un Hund: Kaam mit!

Esel, Hund unKatt: Wigaht na Bremen. Wimaakt Musik.


Hahn: Ikbün de Hahn Rotkopp, kikeriki, kikeriki.

Buer: Gah weg! Du büst mi tooolt.

Esel, Hund unKatt: Kaam mit!

Esel, Hund, Kattun Hahn: Wigaht na Bremen. Wimaakt Musik.




  1. In’t Holt

Esel: Ikbünmööd, i-a, i-a.

Hund: Ikhebbsmacht, wau, wau.

Katt: Ikhebb Dost, miau, miau.

Hahn: Ik sehe en Licht, kikeriki.




  1. In’tHuus van de Rövers

  1. Röver: Hm, datsmecktgoot.

  2. Röver: Prost! Oh, wathebbikför’n Dost.

  3. Röver: GodenAptiet! Dat isgoot.

  4. Röver: Dat is lecker.



  1. VördatHuus van de Rövers

Esel: Ikhebb ne Idee. Packan, stieg upmienRügg!

Hund: Bartputzer, stieg upmienRügg!

Katt: Rotkopp, fleegupmienRügg!

Esel: Un nu: een, twee, dree, fardig, los!

Allmit’nanner: Ia, wau, miau, kikeriki!

(De Deerters stört dör’t Finster in’tRöverhuus.

Die Rövers verjagt sikdüchtig und flüchtin’t Holt)


  1. In’tHuus van de Rövers

Esel: Hm, datsmecktgoot.

Hund: Prost! Oh, wathebbikför’n Dost.

Katt: GodenAptiet! Dat isgoot.

Hahn: Dat is lecker.

Alltohoop: Wisünd so mööd. Wigahtslapen.



  1. In’t Holt unin’tRöverhuus

Röverhauptmann: Du geihsttrüggin’tHuus!

(wiest up eenRöver)

(Heslicktin’tHuus)

All Deerters: I-a, wau-wau, miau, kikeriki!

(Se biet, kratzt unpett den Röver. De haut af.)

Die Bremer Stadtmusikanten

Kurzfassung nach der Plattdeutschen Version



  1. Auf dem Bauernhof

Esel: Ich bin der Esel Langohr, i-a, i-a.

Bauer: Geh weg! Du bist mirzu alt!

Esel: Ich geh nach Bremen. Ich mache Musik.
Hund: Ich bin der Hund Packan, wau, wau.

Bauer: Geh weg! Du bist mirzu alt!

Esel: Komm mit!

Esel und Hund: Wir gehen nach Bremen. Wir machen Musik.


Katze: Ich bin die KatzeBartputzer, miau, miau.

Bauer: Geh weg! Du bist mirzu alt!

Esel und Hund: Komm mit!

Esel, Hund und Katze: Wir gehen nach Bremen. Wir machen Musik.



Hahn: Ich bin der Hahn Rotkopf, kikeriki, kikeriki.

Bauer: Geh weg! Du bist mirzu alt!

Esel, Hund und Katze: Komm mit!

Esel, Hund, Katze und Hahn: Wir gehen nach Bremen. Wir machen Musik.




  1. Im Wald

Esel: Ich bin müde, i-a, i-a.

Hund: Ich habe Hunger, wau, wau.

Katze: Ich habe Durst, miau, miau.

Hahn: Ich sehe ein Licht, kikeriki.




  1. Im Haus der Räuber

  1. Räuber: Hm, das schmeckt gut.

  2. Räuber: Prost! Oh, was hab ich für einen Durst.

  3. Räuber: Guten Appetit. Das ist gut.

  4. Räuber: Das ist lecker.


  1. Vor dem Haus der Räuber

Esel: Ich habe eine Idee. Packan, steig auf meinen Rücken!

Hund: Bartputzer, steig auf meinen Rücken!

Katze: Rotkopf, flieg auf meinen Rücken!

Esel: Und nun: eins, zwei, drei, fertig, los!

Alle miteinander: I-a, wau, miau, kikeriki!

(Die Tiere stürzen im Dunkeln ins Räuberhaus.

Die Räuber erschrecken sich tüchtig und flüchten in den Wald)




  1. Im Räuberhaus

Esel: Hm, das schmeckt gut.

Hund: Prost! Oh, was hab ich für einen Durst.

Katze: Guten Appetit! Das ist gut.

Hahn: Das ist lecker.

Alle zusammen: Wir sind so müde. Wir gehen schlafen.



  1. Im Wald und im Räuberhaus

Räuberhauptmann: Du gehst zurück ins Haus!

(zeigt auf einen Räuber)

(Er schleicht ins Haus)

Alle Tiere: I-a, wau-wau, miau, kikeriki!

(Sie beißen, kratzen und treten den Räuber. Der haut ab.)



The Town Musicians of Bremen

Short Version according to the Play in Plattdeutsch Language



  1. On thefarm

Donkey: I’m the donkey Longear, i-a, i-a.

Farmer: Go away! You are too old for me.

Donkey: I’ll go to Bremen. I’ll make music.

Dog: I’m the dog Packan, wau, wau.

Farmer: Go away! You are too old for me.

Donkey: Come with me!

Donkey and Dog: We‘ll go to Bremen. We’ll make music.

Cat: I’m the cat Beardcleaner, miau, miau.

Farmer: Go away! You are too old for me.

Donkey and dog: Come with us!

Donkey, dog and cat: We‘ll go to Bremen. We’ll make music.


Rooster: I’m the rooster Redhead, kikeriki, kikeriki.

Farmer: Go away! You are too old for me.

Donkey, dog and cat: Come with us!

Donkey, dog, cat and rooster: We‘ll go to Bremen. We’ll make music.




  1. In the Woods

Donkey: I’m tired, i-a, i-a.

Dog: I’m hungry, wau, wau.

Cat: I’m thirsty, miau, miau.

Rooster: I can see a light, kikeriki.




  1. In thehouseofrobbers

  1. Robber: Hm, this tastes nice.

  2. Robber: Cheers! Oh, how thirsty I am.

  3. Robber: Enjoy your meal! This is good.

  4. Robber: This istasty.




  1. In front of the robber’s house

Donkey: I got an idea. Packan, climb on my back!

Dog: Beardcleaner, climb on my back!

Cat: Redhead, fly on to my back!

Donkey: And now – one, two, three, ready – go!

Esel: Und nun: eins, zwei, drei, fertig, los!

All together: I-a, wau, miau, kikeriki!

(The animals burst into the robbers house in darkness.

The robbers were frightened very much and fled to the woods.)



  1. In the Robbers House

Donkey: Hm, this is tasty.

Dog: Cheers! Oh, how I’m thirsty.

Cat: Enjoy your meal. This is good.

Rooster: This is very tasty.

All together: We are so tired. We’llgotosleep.


  1. In the woods and in the robbers house

Chief of the robbers: You go back to the house!

(pointing to a robber)

(He crept softly into the house)

All animals: I-a, wau-wau, miau, kikeriki!

(They bite, scratch and hit the robber. The robber runs away.)


The Cave of the Dragon

Many centuries ago the great cave which is located before the monastery of Mavriotissa was a goldmine and was guarded by a dragon who was breathing and expiring flames and poisonous steam from his mouth.



After the building of Kastoria ( 7th or 8th century), Kastor, the first king,wanting to amuse his guest brother Polidefkis and his father - in- law Keli, a priest of the god, he disclosed this huge cave. But the presence of the dragon stopped them from approaching the cave. Then the king promised great gifts to the one who would kill the dragon. A strong young man appeared. A fierce battle with the dragon followed. He was beating the dragon with his sword and the rocks around were shaking and the waters of the lake were moving. The monster was hit and was floating dead on the waters of the lake. They celebrated this fact and thanked God Panas. Then, with their torches they walked into the cave, bending their heads so as not to hit on the stalactites. It was kilometers deep and the atmosphere was getting hectic because of the lack of oxygen. In the spot where the tunnel gets narrow, the torches were out and there was deep darkness. Then, they heard a voice telling them “…he who will get a handful of the mud he is stepping on, will be sorry!!!” The braver ones took mud but the others were to scared, so they didn’t take any. When they went out, in the sunlight, those who had taken the mud saw, to their surprise, that they were holding liquid stardust.

ΜΥΘΟΣ ΣΠΗΛΑΙΟΥ ΔΡΑΚΟΥ ΚΑΣΤΟΡΙΑΣ

"Πριν από πολλούς αιώνες η μεγάλη σπηλιά που βρίσκεται πριν από το μοναστήρι της Μαυριώτισσας ήταν χρυσορυχείο και το φύλαγε ένας δράκος που ανέπνεε και έβγαζε από το στόμα του φλόγες και δηλητηριασμένους ατμούς.


Ύστερα από το κτίσιμο της Καστοριάς (Ή’ ή Ι’ αιώνας) ο πρώτος βασιλιάς ο Κάστωρ, θέλοντας να διασκεδάσει τον φιλοξενούμενο αδελφό του Πολυδεύκη και τον πεθερό του Κέλι ιερέα του θεού, απεκάλυψε το τεράστιο αυτό σπήλαιο. Η παρουσία όμως του δράκου τους εμπόδιζε την προσέγγιση στη σπηλιά.. Τότε ο βασιλιάς υπεσχέθη μεγάλα δώρα σ’αυτόν που θα σκότωνε τον δράκο. Ένας νέος δυνατός παρουσιάστηκε. Επηκολούθησε άγρια πάλη με τον δράκο. Χτυπώντας τον με το κοντάρι του έτρεμαν οι γύρω βράχοι και αναταράζονταν τα νερά της λίμνης. Το τέρας κτυπήθηκε και έπλεε νεκρό επάνω στα νερά της λίμνης. Πανηγύρισαν το γεγονός και ευχαριστίαι ανεπέμφθησαν στον Πάνα. Και κατόπιν με αναμμένους δαυλούς προχώρησαν στη σπηλιά με σκυφτά τα κεφάλια τους για να μην κτυπήσουν τους σταλακτίτες. Το βάθος εκτεινόταν σε χιλιόμετρα και η ατμόσφαιρα γινόταν πνιγηρή από έλειψιν οξυγόνου. Σε ένα μέρος που η σήραγγα στενεύει έσβησαν οι δαυλοί και πηχτό σκοτάδι τους σφιχταγκάλιασε όλους. Τότε άκουσαν μια απόκοσμη φωνή να λέει : ΄΄ εκείνος που θα σκύψει να πάρει μια χούφτα της λάσπης που πατάει θα μετανοιώσει ΄΄. Οι πιο θαρετοί έσκυψαν και επήραν λάσπη και εγέμισαν τους κόρφους τους. Οι άλλοι φοβήθηκαν και δεν τόλμησαν να πάρουν. Όταν βγήκαν στο φως του ηλίου εκείνοι που κρατούσαν τη λάσπη είδαν με έκπληξη πως κρατούσαν υγρή χρυσόσκονη…"

Έτσι περιγράφει ο λαογράφος Δ. Γιαννούσης ( Ακρόπολη, 11-7-54) την παράδοση σχετικά με το Σπήλαιο του Δράκου.



Fionn Mac Cumhaill
Once upon a time there was a great Irish Giant called Fionn Mac Cumhaill. His most frightening enemies were the Scottish Giants. Fionn was enraged and determined to reach them that he constructed an enormous causeway from Ulster to Scotland. He assembled the causeway from unique six sided cobblestones so they would fit tidily together.

One day Fionn yelled a challenge to the Scottish Giant Benandonner to cross the causeway and battle him. But as soon as he saw Benandonner getting closer. He realized that Benandonner was much bigger than himself. Fionn sprinted back home to Fort of Allen in County Kildare and told his wife that he had asked for a fight with a Scottish Giant but had thought better of it now.

Fionn heard the stamping feet of Benandonner. Benandonner carried a spear which was as tall and as thick as a tower. He picked up the spear and knocked on the door of Fionn Mac Cumhaill’s house. Fionn decided to ignore but Finn’s wife Oonagh opened the door and said “Are you here to see Fionn?” Benandonner replied “Yes...Yes I am” “Well i am afraid he’s not here he’s out hunting deer in County Kerry” said Oonagh “ But you can wait for him if you want?” Benandonner entered the house and laid his spear next to Fionn’s.
Oonagh made Benandonner a cake. It wasn’t any ordinary cake, she slyly put a handful of stones into it. She served the cake to Benandonner. He took a bite and wailed. He had broken his three front teeth. Oonagh asked the wailing giant if he would like to see her baby. She show Benandonner the baby. (The baby was actually Fionn Mac Cumhaill wrapped in sheets in the bath). Before showing Benandonner the baby Oonagh gave him honey beer which made him woozy and asked if he could go outside to clear his head. Oonagh showed him to the door. When they reached the door Benandonner thanked Oonagh for the cake and decided he wouldn’t wait no longer for Fionn as he wanted to get home to Scotland before the tide comes in . Fionn lept out of the cradle bath and also thanked Oonagh for her help. He then chased Benandonner out of Ireland. He scooped an enormous piece of land out of the ground and flung it at the Scottish Giant. He missed and it landed in the Irish Sea that piece of land became the Isle of Man and the hole left behind became Lough Neagh the biggest lake in Ireland. Fionn Mac Cumhaill and Benandonner tore up the causeway and the only bit that is left is the ragged end in Antrim remains there this day.

                   





Fionn Mac Cumhaill

Once upon a time there was a great Irish Giant called Fionn Mac Cumhaill. His most frightening enemies were the Scottish Giants. Fionn was enraged and determined to reach them that he constructed an enormous causeway from Ulster to Scotland. He assembled the causeway from unique six sided cobblestones so they would fit tidily together.
One day Fionn yelled a challenge to the Scottish Giant Benandonner to cross the causeway and battle him. But as soon as he saw Benandonner getting closer. He realized that Benandonner was much bigger than himself. Fionn sprinted back home to Fort of Allen in County Kildare and told his wife that he had asked for a fight with a Scottish Giant but had thought better of it now.

Fionn heard the stamping feet of Benandonner. Benandonner carried a spear which was as tall and as thick as a tower. He picked up the spear and knocked on the door of Fionn Mac Cumhaill’s house. Fionn decided to ignore but Finn’s wife Oonagh opened the door and said “Are you here to see Fionn?” Benandonner replied “Yes...Yes I am” “Well i am afraid he’s not here he’s out hunting deer in County Kerry” said Oonagh “ But you can wait for him if you want?” Benandonner entered the house and laid his spear next to Fionn’s.

Oonagh made Benandonner a cake. It wasn’t any ordinary cake, she slyly put a handful of stones into it. She served the cake to Benandonner. He took a bite and wailed. He had broken his three front teeth. Oonagh asked the wailing giant if he would like to see her baby. She show Benandonner the baby. (The baby was actually Fionn Mac Cumhaill wrapped in sheets in the bath). Before showing Benandonner the baby Oonagh gave him honey beer which made him woozy and asked if he could go outside to clear his head. Oonagh showed him to the door. When they reached the door Benandonner thanked Oonagh for the cake and decided he wouldn’t wait no longer for Fionn as he wanted to get home to Scotland before the tide comes in . Fionn lept out of the cradle bath and also thanked Oonagh for her help. He then chased Benandonner out of Ireland. He scooped an enormous piece of land out of the ground and flung it at the Scottish Giant. He missed and it landed in the Irish Sea that piece of land became the Isle of Man and the hole left behind became Lough Neagh the biggest lake in Ireland. Fionn Mac Cumhaill and Benandonner tore up the causeway and the only bit that is left is the ragged end in Antrim remains there this day.

                   


The Dragon’s Myth

The myth tells that an enormous dragon flew over the island called Ischia.

When the dragon landed on the island, it destroyed everything: trees, people , food….

One day the dragon raised up in the sky but it fell on the island.

The dragon broke out in many pieces…..

The eyes with the eyebrows fell in a place called Ciglio.



The abdomen (pancia) fell in “Panza”.

The dragon’s head fell in a place , now called “Testaccio”.

So in Ischia there is a place called Bocca (mouth), another one called Piedimonte (mountain feet), … thanks to this myth.

Il mito del Drago

Questo mito racconta che un enorme drago volava sull’isola di Ischia.

Quando il drago volava a bassa quota sull’isola, esso distruggeva qualsiasi cosa: alberi, cibo, persone, eccetera.

Un giorno il drago volò molto in alto nel cielo ma subito dopo cadde rovinosamente al suolo, smembrandosi in tanti pezzi: gli occhi con le sopracciglia caddero in un posto chiamato CIGLIO, la pancia cadde a PANZA, la testa cadde a TESTACCIO, le zampe a PIEDIMONTE e così via. In questo modo, il drago ha dato il nome a tanti luoghi dell’isola di Ischia.



Thyphon’s Myth: This myth explains the birth of our island.

Every year the Titans offered gifts to the God Jupiter who lived on Mount Olympus. One day one of the Titans, named Typhon, decided to rebel to Jupiter. The god Jupiter became furious and decided to punish the Titans. The Titans decided to chase away the God Jupiter and climbed Mount Olympus. The god Jupiter threw a huge boulder against the Titans. The giant Typhon remained imprisoned under that rock. 

In this way the island of Ischia was born: Typhon still lies beneath our island!


Il Mito di Tifeo: questo mito spiega come è nata la nostra isola.

Ogni anno i Titani offrivano doni al Dio Giove che viveva sul Monte Olimpo. Un giorno uno dei Titani, chiamato Tifeo, decise di ribellarsi al Dio Giove. Giove divenne furioso e decise di punire i Titani. I titani decisero di cacciare via Giove e, quindi, si arrampicarono sul Monte Olimpo. Giove, dall’alto del monte, scagliò un enorme masso contro i Titani. Il gigante Tifeo restò imprigionato sotto quell’enorme masso. Cominciò a piangere per la disperazione, le sue lacrime riempirono il mare. In questo modo è nata l’isola di Ischia: Tifeo ancora giace sotto Ischia e il suo movimento causa i terremoti su Ischia!



The Old Man's Mitten

Once upon a time there lived an old man. In a cold winter he went to the forest for wood. The old man wanted to light his pipe. While he was looking for the pipe and the light, he lost one of his mittens.

   A fly trying to escape the cold, notices the mitten, runs into it and starts to dance of joy.

  A mouse, trying to escape the cold, runs up to the mitten and asks,

"Who's dancing in the mitten?"

  "It's me, the Queen of flies. But who are you?"

   "It's me, the mouse Squeaky. Let me in to get warm!"

   "All right, come in and warm."

The mouse crawls in the mitten and both start to dance.

   A hare trying to escape the cold, noticed the mitten, runs towards it and asks,

   "Who's dancing in the mitten?"

  And both dancers reply, "It's me, the Queen of flies and me, the mouse Squeaky. But who are you?"

   "It's me, the hare Short-tail. Let me in to get warm!"

   "All right, come in and warm."

  The hare crawls into the mitten, and all three start to dance.

   A wolf trying to escape the cold, noticed the mitten, runs up and asks,

"Who's dancing in the mitten?"

  "It's me, the Queen of flies, the mouse Squeaky and the hare Short-tail. But who are you?"

   "It's me, the wolf Stumpy-ears. Let me in to get warm!"

   "All right, come in and warm."

  The wolf crawls into the mitten, and all four start to dance.



   A bear trying to escape the cold, finds the mitten and asks,

"Who's dancing in the mitten?"

  "It's me, the Queen of flies, the mouse Squeaky and the hare Short-tail and me, the wolf Stumpy-ears. But who are you?"

   "It's me, the BIG Shaggy. Let me in to get warm!"

   "All right, come in and warm."

  The bear crawls into the mitten, and all five start to dance.

  Wherein been where no, a cock appears near the mitten and crows "cock-a-doodle-doo!"

   All the dancers get frightened and start to break out of the mitten. The fly goes to the palace, the mouse to the potato cellar, the hare in oats ,the wolf in the bushes, the bear in the forest.

   Running away they tear up the mitten. And so the old man to this day lives without one mitten.


Translated by students of Ventspils Secondary School Nr 5, Form 6a; pictures Form 4a.

Vecīša cimdiņš

Dzīvoja sirms vecītis. Reiz aukstā ziemā viņš brauca uz mežu pēc malkas. Vecītim iegribējās aizdegt pīpīti. Kamēr viņš azotē meklēja pīpi, tabaku un šķiltavas, tikām pazaudēja vienu cimdiņu.

   Muša, bēgdama no aukstuma, ierauga cimdiņu, ieskrien iekšā un sāk no prieka dancot.

  Pelīte, bēgdama no aukstuma, pieskrien pie cimdiņa un jautā: «Kas te cimdiņā danco?»

   «Es, pati mušu ķēniņiene. Bet kas tu esi?»

   «Es esmu pelīte pīkstīte. Laid mani pasildīties!»

   «Nu lien un sildies!»

   Pelīte ielien cimdā, un abas ar mušu sāk dancot.

   Zaķītis, bēgdams no aukstuma, ierauga cimdiņu, skrien klāt un jautā:

   «Kas tai cimdiņā danco?»

   Un abas dancotājas atsaka: «Es, muša ķēniņiene, pelīte pīkstīte. Bet kas tu tāds?»

   «Es esmu zaķītis baltļipītis. Ielaidiet mani pasildīties!»

 «Labi, lien un sildies!»

   Zaķītis ielien cimdā, un nu sāk visi trīs dancot.

   Vilks, bēgdams no aukstuma, ierauga cimdiņu un jautā: «Kas tai cimdiņā danco?»

   «Es, muša ķēniņiene, pelīte pīkstīte, zaķītis baltļipītis. Bet kas tu tāds esi?»


   «Es esmu vilks strupausis. Ielaidiet mani pasildīties!»

   «Labi, lien un sildies!»

   Vilks ielien cimdiņā, un nu sāk visi četratā dancot.

   Lācis, bēgdams no aukstuma, atrod cimdiņu un jautā: «Kas tur tai cimdiņā danco?»

   «Es, muša ķēniņiene, pelīte pīkstīte, zaķītis baltļipītis, vilciņš strupausītis. Bet kas tu tāds esi?»

   «Es —pats lielais pinka. Laidiet mani pasildīties!»

   «Labi, lien un sildies.»

   Lācis ielien cimdiņā, un nu visi piecatā sāk pa cimdiņu dancot.

   Kur bijis, kur ne, atskrien gailis un aizdziedas: «Kikerigū!»

   Dancotāji nobīstas un visi sāk ar spēku lauzties no cimdiņa ārā. Muša dodas uz ķēniņa pili, pelīte uz kartupeļu pagrabu, zaķītis auzās, vilks krūmos, lācis mežā.

   Skriedami saplēš vecīša cimdiņu. Un tā vecītis līdz šai dienai staigā ar vienu cimdiņu.

The Ash Lad who had an eating competition with a troll

Once upon a time, there was a father, a mother and three sons. They were very poor and lived in the woods, and made their living by chopping wood. However, the father had become old and weak and couldn’t chop wood anymore. Therefore he asked the oldest of his three sons to chop wood for him. The son agreed and ventured into the woods with his axe and backpack. While he was chopping wood he heard a loud voice that made even the tree’s shiver with fear “Who dares to chop in my wood?” “ It’s only me, Per”. “ If you don’t stop chopping in my wood immediately, I’ll kill you!” Per threw everything he held in his hands and ran as fast as he could, leaving the axe and backpack behind.

When he came home, he was accused of being a coward and a liar. When his oldest brother heard this, he decided it was his turn to show his father how strong he was and volunteered instead of Per. Proudly he said: “I can chop wood for you father, I’m not afraid of any Troll”.

He left the next morning with his axe and backpack. But when he came, and started chopping wood, he also heard what his brother had heard the previous day. “Who dares to chop in my wood?” “It’s only me, Paal”. “If you don’t stop chopping in my wood immediately, I’ll kill you!” Paal threw everything he held in his hands and ran as fast as he could, leaving the axe and backpack behind.

When he came home, he told the same story as his brother. His father shook his head and said; “In all my years as a wood chopper I’ve never encountered any troll.” When the youngest brother heard this he volunteered just as the second brother had. But was instantly rejected. "You, chop wood? Don't make me laugh. If neither Paal nor I could do it, what makes you think you can?" Just believe in me…” before he could finish, Per and Paal and his father broke into laughter. The Ash Lad thought to himself; "One day, one day I'll prove them wrong!" Little did the Ash Lad know that that day would soon appear. After persuading and trying to convince his father, the father finally gave in. The mother however wasn’t too happy about it.

The next day the Ash Lad traveled into the wood with his axe and backpack, and of course the lunch his mother had prepared for him containing some fresh cheese and bread. After chopping for a while, he heard what his brother had run away from. "Who dares to chop in my wood?!!". The Ash Lad didn't answer but ran over to his backpack and pulled out the cheese and replied determinedly; " If you don't shut up I'll squeeze you like I'm squeezing the water out of this rock. “The troll trembled with fear and responded: "Please don't, I'll even help you chop, but please spare me." The Ash Lad was pleased with himself, and the troll helped him chop wood.


When night fell, the troll offered to go his place as it was shorter to his home than the Ash Lad's. The troll would like to make porridge for supper and asked the Ash Lad to fetch water while he was making the fire. To the Ash Lad’s surprise there were two iron buckets so heavy that the Ash Lad couldn't budge them an inch. "These buckets are too small for me, I'd rather go and fetch the well instead," said the Ash Lad arrogantly. "No please, I want to keep my well, why don't you light the fire while I go and fetch the water?

When the troll came back with the water, the porridge was cooking in a big saucepan. “Would you like to have an eating competition and see who can eat the most?” the Ash Lad asked the troll. The troll answered happily; "Yes", because he knew no one could beat him at that. While the troll was busy lifting the pot with porridge on to the table, the Ash Lad quickly put his backpack in front of his stomach under his sweater.

While they were eating The Ash Lad discreetly stuffed porridge in his backpack. After a while he cut a hole in his "stomach" and let the porridge pour out. The troll just looked at him, but continued eating. Shortly afterwards the troll said, "I can't eat anymore, I’m so full." "Just do like I did and cut a hole in your stomach," the Ash Lad said grinning. "Doesn't that hurt?" "Not really," the Ash Lad answered. Then the troll cut a whole in his stomach and died instantly of course. The Ash Lad took all the gold and silver he found in the troll’s house and ran happily home, and they all lived happily ever after .

Askeladden som kappåt med trollet

Det var engang en bonde som hadde tre sønner; han var i små kår og gammel og skrøpelig, og sønnene ville ikke ta seg noe til. Til gården hørte en stor, god skog, og den ville faren at guttene skulle hugge i, og se å få betalt unna noe på gjelden.

Langt om lenge fikk han dem også på det travet, og den eldste skulle ut og hugge først. Da han var kommet bort i skogen og hadde tatt til å hugge på en skjegget gran, kom det et stort, digert troll til ham. "Dersom du hugger i min skog, skal jeg drepe deg!" sa trollet. Da gutten hørte det, kastet han øksen og la hjem igjen det beste han kunne. Han kom rent andpusten hjem og fortalte det som hadde hendt ham; men faren sa han var et harehjerte; trollene hadde aldri skremt ham fra å hugge da han var ung, mente han.

Dagen etter skulle den andre sønnen avsted, og da gikk det nettopp like ens. Da han vel hadde hugget noen hugg i granen, kom trollet til ham med og sa: "Dersom du hugger i min skog, skal jeg drepe deg!" Gutten torde snaut se på ham, han kastet øksen og tok til sprangs likesom broren og vel så fort. Da han kom hjem igjen, ble faren sint, og sa at aldri hadde trollene skremt ham, da han var ung.
Tredje dagen ville Askeladden i vei.

"Ja, du!" sa de to eldste, "du skal vel klare det, du som aldri har vært utom stuedøra!" Han svarte ikke større på det, Askeladden, men ba bare om å få dugelig niste med seg. Moren hadde ikke så mye, og gav han litt gammelt brød og en ost; det la han i skreppen, og la av gårde.

Da han hadde hugget en liten stund, kom trollet til ham og sa: "Dersom du hugger i min skog, skal jeg drepe deg!" Men gutten var ikke sen; han sprang bort i skogen etter osten og krystet den så mysa skvatt. "Tier du ikke still," skrek han til trollet, skal jeg klemme deg, som jeg klemmer vannet av denne hvite steinen!"

"Nei, kjære spar meg," sa trollet, "jeg skal hjelpe deg å hugge."

Ja, på det vilkår sparte gutten ham, og trollet var dyktig til å hugge, så de fikk felt og avhugget mange trær den dagen.

Da det led mot kvelden, sa trollet: "Nå kan du følge med hjem, det er nærmere til meg enn til deg." Ja, gutten ble med, og da de kom hjem til trollet, skulle han gjøre opp varme på peisen, mens gutten skulle gå etter vann til grautgryta; men det sto to jernbøtter der, så store og tunge at han ikke orket å lee på dem engang.

Så sa gutten: "Det er ikke verdt å ta med disse fingerbølene; jeg går etter hele brønnen jeg."

"Nei, kjære vene," sa trollet, "jeg kan ikke miste brønnen min; gjør du opp varme, skal jeg gå etter vann."

Da han kom tilbake med vannet, kokte de opp en dugelig stor grautgryte.

"Det er det samme," sa gutten, "vil du som jeg, skal vi kappete."

"Å ja!" svarte trollet; for det tenkte han alltid han skulle stå seg i.

Ja, de satte seg til bords; men gutten stjal seg til å ta skinnskreppen og knyte foran seg, og så øste han mer i skreppen enn han åt selv. Da skreppen var full, tok han opp tollekniven sin og rispet en flenge i skreppen. Trollet så på ham, men sa ikke noe.

Da de hadde ett en god stund til, la trollet bort skjeen. "Nei, nå orker jeg ikke mer," sa han. "Du skal ete!" svarte gutten; "jeg er snaut halvmett enda, jeg. Gjør du som jeg gjorde, og skjær hull på magen, så eter du så mye du vil."

"Men det gjør vel gruelig vondt?" spurte trollet.

"Å, ikke noe å tale om," svarte gutten.

Så gjorde trollet som gutten sa, og så kan en vel vite han satte livet til. Men gutten tok alt det sølv og gull som i berget fans, og gikk hjem med. Med det kunne han alltid få betalt unna noe på gjelden. 


Jánošík’ s revenge

One day there was a market in Liptovský Ján. A poor villager wanted to sell his two oxen. He was standing in the middle of the crowd of people and shouting competitively. „ Buy my oxen, buy my oxen for a great value “. A rich man, who was by the way the most famous butcher in the region, stopped by him and said: „They look very good and healthy. I will give you 300 talers (a coin used in those days) for each one. “



All right, let’s go and drink the purchase down,” said the villager and they went to have a drink. Than the butcher went home and the villager wanted to pay for the drinks. But, what happened? The bartender said that the coins were false and he couldn’t pay anything with them. The villager was very unhappy. He didn’t notice that someone was standing beside him. It was Juro Jánošík but disguised.

Juro asked the villager what had happened. The villager told him about the butcher and his fake. Juro wanted to see the money the villager had got from the butcher and before the villager could say thanks, Juro had gone. This night Juro sent a letter to the butcher. It said this: „You mean butcher! You tricked the poor villager. You should give him his oxen back or I will be forced to see you tomorrow personally and take the oxen myself. This is the one and only warning! “



When the mean butcher read the letter, he laughed. Who could rob him when he had so many guards? He burnt the letter and went to sleep. The next day he went to the reeve and requested for more guards from the army. The day passed and nobody came. „Jánošík definitely got scared and ran away, “ he thought.

But, in the evening a carriage stood in front of the butcher´s house and a gentleman got out of it. He said: „ I´m the speaker of the local landlord Mr. Turčányi and I came here because my lord has wedding this week and we heard that you have the most beautiful oxen in the wide surroundings and we want to buy them.” „Oh, I´m very pleased to see you “, said the butcher and invited the gentleman in. When they were alone in one of the rooms, the gentleman locked the door and pulled out a pair of guns from inside of his belt. It was Juro.


The butcher couldn´t reply a single word. Juro said: „ You’d rather order your servants to bring 2 oxen to the villager from Terchová and give me all the money you have in your safe- the fakes and also the real ones.“ The butcher had no chance. He had to do all Juro said. Juro finally told the landlord: „I´ll get to know if you do it or not. So don´t trick him again. “ And he disappeared. The butcher never tricked anybody ever after.

Translated by : Lenka Červeňová, Pavol Lipničan

Illustrated by: Lucka Juričáková

Jánošíkova pomsta

Jedného dňa bol v Liptovskom Jáne trh. Chudobný dedinčan chcel predať svoje dva býky takže stál uprostred davu ľudí a kričali : " Kúpte moje býky, kúpte moje býky za veľmi dobrú cenu". Bohatý muž , ktorý bol mimochodom najslávnejší mäsiar v regióne, zastavil a povedal : " Vyzerajú veľmi dobre a zdravé sú. Dám vám 300 toliarov ( mince používané v tých časoch ) za každého z nich . "

" Tak dobre . Poďme zapiť nákup ! " povedal dedinčan a šli na pohárik . Ako mäsiar išiel domov a dedinčan chcel zaplatiť, čo sa nestalo ? Krčmár povedal , že mince sú falošné a s takými nemôže nič zaplatiť. Dedinčan bol veľmi nešťastný . Nevšimol si , že niekto stál vedľa neho. Bolo to Juro Jánošík , ale bol prestrojený.

Spýtal sa dedinčana , čo sa stalo . Dedinčan mu povedal o mäsiarovi a jeho falošnej platbe. Juro si vypýtal peniaze, ktoré dedinčan dostal od mäsiara a prv než dedinčan mohol poďakovať, Juro odišiel. Tú noc Juro poslal list mäsiarovi. V loite stálo: Ty zlý lakomý mäsiar ! Podviedol si dedinčana . AK mu býky nevrátiš späť, budem nútený ťa zajtra navštíviť osobne a vziať býky sám . Toto je jediné varovanie!"

Ako mäsiar prečítal list, zasmial sa . Kto by ho mohol okradnúť, keď mal toľko stráží? Spálil list a išiel spať . Na druhý deň išiel k richtárovi a požiadal o ďalšie stráže z armády . Keď deň uplynul a nikto neprišiel, mäsiar si pomyslel: " Jánošík určite dostal strach a utiekol . "

Ale vo večerných hodinách pred domom mäsiara zastavil kočiar. Muž z kočiara povedal strážnikovi: " Ja som hovorca miestneho zemepána a prišiel som sem , pretože môj pán má svadbu a počuli sme , že máte najkrajšie býčky v širokom okolí. Chceme ich kúpiť. "

" Ó, som veľmi rád, že Vás vidím," povedal mäsiar a vyzval pána dovnútra. Keď boli sami v jednej z miestností, pán zamkol dvere a vytiahol pár zbraní z vnútornej strany opasku . Bol to Juro v prezlečení.

Mäsiar nemohol povedať ani slovo . Juro mu povedal : " Byť Tebou, radšej si objednám služobníkov , aby dva býky dedinčanovi z Terchovej doniesli a mne všetky peniaze, aj pravé zo sejfu aj tie falošné dal.“ Mäsiar nemal šancu. Urobil všetko čo Juro povedal. Juro ešte ubezpečil mäsiara, že ak ešte bude počuť, že niekoho okradol alebo oklamal, príde zas a zmizol.


The legend of Juro Jánošík

According to folk legends, Jánošík was an ordinary man that fought for rights of ordinary people. There are lots of stories, legends, poems, and TV films about him. He was a real person that lived in the 17- th century. He lived in Fatra mountains near Terchová village. He was an outlaw and he lived there with his band of outlaws.

Jánošík became a popular hero, because he and his band of outlaws helped ordinary people. When they saw rich people travelling through the forest or along mountain path, they used to grab their money, jewels and other possessions and give them to the poor.

Juraj´s great enemy were the corrupted and cruel landlords of the region. Jánošík was very brave and clever. Before he become an outlaw he was a student and he studied to be a priest. So, he often wore disguises to trich his enemies.

Jánošík was caught when he was in a local pub and an old woman threw the peas under the Jánošík´s feet and he skidded. The “knights” could arrest him easily and they hanged him. On the mortal platform he could not let the landlords to hang him so Jánošík´s last words were : “ When you caught me cheeky like that, you can eat me up!” And he jumped up on the hook and hang himself on a rib.

3 fairies’ gifts

One of the legends said that 3 fairies gave Jánošík 3 magic things - a magic shirt, a magic belt and a magic forest plant as gifts for dancing with them all night long.


These gave him an exceptional power. Unfortunately, he didn´t have these 3 magic things with him when he was in the local pub where the knights arrested him. The daughter of the old woman was very sly and she stole the fairies’ magic gifts. Jánošík lost his power and was caught easily.


Translated by: Lenka Líšková, Erika Babinská, Tatiana Jaššová

Legenda o Jurovi Jánošíkovi

Podľa ľudových povestí Jánošík bol obyčajný človek, ktorý bojoval za práva obyčajných ľudí . Existuje o ňom veľa príbehov , legiend , básní i televíznych filmov. Žil začiatkom 17. storočia. Žil v horách a lesoch v okolí Terchovej pri Žiline so skupinou hôrnych chlapcov, ktorých volali zbojníci. Jánošík sa stal populárnym hrdinom, pretože so svojou bandou zbojníkov okrádali bohatých zemepánov a s poddanými sa delili o lup - zbojstvo – šperky, látky, toliare a iné. Jánošíka chytili v krčme drábi, keď mu úlisná starena hodila pod nohy hrach, na ktorom sa pošmykol a tak ho ľahko zlapali. Popravili ho zavesením na hák o ľavé rebrá. Jeho osledné slová zneli. „ keď ste si ma upiekli, tak si ma aj zjedzte.“



Dary 3 víl

Jedna z legiend hovorí , že 3 víly dali Jánošíkovi 3 veci – kúzelnú košeľu, čarovný opasok, čarovnú lesnú rastlinku - ako darček za to, že s nimi pretancoval celú noc. Tie mu dali čarovnú moc, ktorá mu pomáhala bojovať za práva poddaných. Bohužiaľ, práve v noci, keď ho mali zlapať, nemal tieto tri magické veci so sebou , aj preto ho drábi ľahko chytili.. Dcéra stareny, ktorá pomohla drábom, bola veľmi prefíkaná a ukradla čarovné dary od víl . Jánošík stratil svoju moc a ľahko ho chytili.



Illustrated by : Lucka Bohucká, Jessica Páterková

The 3 twigs of King Svatopluk

Back in around 896 AD Great Moravian king Svatopluk had three sons: Mojmír, Svätopluk a Predslav. They quarrelled who will take over their father as the king of Great Moravia. According to the traditions, the eldest son was the heir of the throne. However, all Svatopluk’s sons wanted to rule the country.

Svatopluk asked his sons to see him before his death. The sons were surprised because their father- their father- the king Svatopluk asked them to bring three hazel twigs with them.

He gave a twig to each of the son and asked them to break it. The young noblemen could easily break them. Then he asked them to tie together three twigs and asked them to break them again. This time the sons could not do that.

Then the king Svatopluk told his sons: “My sons, if you are united and help each other, you will be strong and no enemy will defeat you, just as you could not break the three twigs. However, if you quarrel, you will be defeated and your kingdom will be taken by your enemies.”

Svatopluk’ s sons stopped quarrelling and the king appointed his eldest sons to be the heir to the throne.

In spite of their father's warning Great Moravia was divided among the three brothers in 897.

The country, weakened by wars, was destroyed in 907 by a Hungarian attack.



3 prúty kráľa Svätopluka

V roku 896 n.l. v nádhernej dvorane nitrianskeho hradu ležal na posteli staručký kráľ Svätopluk. Oči mu zhasínali ako lúče slnca pred západom. Svätopluk cítil, že ho rýchlo opúšťajú sily. Pozrel na svojho najvernejšieho dvorana a prikázal mu, aby priviedol k posteli jeho troch synov: Mojmíra, Svätopluka a Predslava.

„ Deti moje“, hovoril Svätopluk slávnostným hlasom, keď si synovia stali pred ním pyšne ako tri jedle. „Svieca môjho života dohára. Zanedlho sa rozlúčim s vami. Poputujem pred trón Najvyššieho zodpovedať sa zo svojho pozemského života. Ale prv, než by som vás opustil, čujte moje otcovské ponaučenie a vštepte si ho do sŕdc.“ Nahol sa z postele, vzal do trasúcich rúk zväzok prútov, podal ich najprv Mojmírovi, potom Svätoplukovi a Predslavovi, aby ich na kolenách polámali. Ani jeden zo synov zväzok prútov polámať nevládal. Synovia pozerali na otcovo počínanie nechápavo, udivení.

„ Nedivte sa“, povedal otec. Rozviazal prúty a dal každému synovi jeden z nich.

„ Polámte ich teraz!“ Synovia bez veľkej námahy prúty polámali. Po otcovej tvári preletel víťazoslávny úsmev. Vystrel sa na posteli a povedal:

Učte sa na tomto príklade, deti moje. Lebo tak, ako ste nevládali polámať prúty vo zväzku ani vtedy, keď ste napäli všetky svoje mladé sily, nepremôže vás nepriateľ, keď budete spolu držať, a ako ľahko ste polámali každý prúd osobitne, tak ľahko vás premôžu vaši nepriatelia, keď sa budete medzi sebou hašteriť a biť a keď nebudete svorne spolu bojovať. Toto vám odkazuje váš otec! Buďte svorní, milujte sa vospolok a potom nebude moci, ktorá by vás premohla.“

Týmto spôsobom kráľ svojim potomkom demonštroval potrebu svornosti, pretože len tá im mohla zaručiť neporaziteľnosť a krajine blahobyt.

Kráľovi synovia sa však nechceli vzdať moci, vznikli medzi nimi silné rozpory, ktoré ríšu oslabovali a nakoniec v roku 907 ríšu dobili Maďari.


Illustrated by: Dávid Babinský, Lenka Papáková, Ľubka Juričáková









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