Com 110 overview purpose the overall purpose of the Communication and Critical Inquiry

:)


Download 0.79 Mb.
Page1/14
Date01.05.2018
Size0.79 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   14
COM 110 OVERVIEW

PURPOSE
The overall purpose of the Communication and Critical Inquiry course is to improve students' abilities to express themselves and to listen to others in a variety of communication settings. Effective oral communication is viewed as an essential life skill that every person must possess in order to function in today's society. The course emphasizes participation in a variety of communication processes in order to develop, reinforce, and evaluate communication skills appropriate for public, small group, and interpersonal settings. The course content and experiences will enable students to assume their responsibilities as speaker-listener-critic in a culturally diverse world. In short, the course is designed to make students competent, ethical, critical, confident, and information literate communicators.
Communication Competence

Communication competence consists of four elements: knowledge, skill, motivation, and judgment. The competent communicator is one who has knowledge of the factors that affect message choices (e.g., goals, contexts, culture, power, personality) and their likely outcome (e.g., compliance, persuasion, informing, entertaining, relating). The competent communicator is one who has the skills necessary to construct the most appropriate and efficient messages to achieve desired goals, and the skills to listen for the meaning in others' messages. The competent communicator is one who is motivated to exert the effort necessary to match knowledge and skill in the construction and interpretation of messages. Finally, the competent communicator is one who has developed a keen sense of judgment about how to weigh competing goals, how to meet multiple goals, and how to modify unsuccessful communication efforts both for self and for others. Good judgment is based on the ability to engage in critical thinking, to evaluate arguments, and to recognize biases in one's own and others' communication.

Ethical Communication
To treat other people ethically is to foster their ability to make informed decisions and to respect their rights to express their opinion. Ethical communication is characterized by honesty, clarity, accuracy, open-mindedness, and willingness to listen to others.

Critical Thinking

Students are provided many opportunities to reflect on and evaluate their own, as well as others’, communication behaviors. They will become more critical consumers and producers of the messages they send and receive (this includes the development of a favorable disposition toward critical thinking).



Communication Confidence

Because students are afforded the opportunity to practice their communication skills in a variety of settings, they will begin to increase their communication confidence while decrease their communication apprehension in public speaking, meetings, small group, and interpersonal contexts.


Information Literacy
Students are provided many opportunities to improve their information literacy skills. By researching speeches, students will find, retrieve, analyze, and use information critically.
Course Overview
COMMUNICATION & CRITICAL INQUIRY (COM 110) COURSE GOALS

1) Students will become more competent communicators (using knowledge, skill, motivation, and judgment).

2) Students will become more critical consumers and producers of ideas and information (using analytical reasoning skills in the reception, collection, and presentation of ideas).

3) Students will conduct background research necessary to develop well-informed presentations.

4) Students will evaluate the communication skills of others (identifying effective and ineffective aspects of oral presentations).


  1. Students will become more competent in communicating in small group discussions (articulating and defending their own ideas as well as listening to and considering the ideas of others).

  2. Students will become more effective communicators in a democracy (demonstrating ethical communication, considering multiple perspectives on controversial issues, and managing conflict).


MAJOR ASSIGNMENTS
Although the day-to-day functioning of each class and the specifics of assignments (e.g., point values, due dates, etc.) will vary by instructor, all sections of Communication and Critical Inquiry will have four major assignments. These include a portfolio, an informative speech, a group presentation, and a persuasive speech.
Portfolio
The portfolio is a collection of (1) the student's work in the course (including speech outlines, instructor evaluations, research logs, and videotapes of speeches, etc.), (2) the student's reflections on his or her work (e.g., observations as to what worked well in a speech, how a speech could have been better, etc.), (3) student papers on communication goals and course synthesis, and (4) artifacts that the student collects over the semester that critically evaluate a concept or topic of the class.
Informative Speech

An informative speech provides audience members with new information. This may be done by describing a process, procedure, phenomenon, event, place, person, object, or by explaining how something works or operates. The goal is to create awareness of the subject matter and to increase audience knowledge and understanding. Topics must be original, substantive, and relevant to the audience. Visual aids are required. Additional objectives include learning how to narrow a topic, research and select appropriate supporting materials, cite sources, organize content, and deliver the speech with poise and confidence.


Group Presentation

This project will involve a unique presentational format in which a controversial issue is analyzed from multiple perspectives by a group of speakers (usually 5 to 6). One person typically serves as a moderator and assumes responsibility for introducing the topic, previewing the main issues, providing transitions between speakers, and leading the question-answer session that follows the presentations. Other members serve as "experts" representing each of the relevant perspectives. The group presentation provides an opportunity to explore an issue in much greater depth than is possible in an individual speech.


Persuasive Speech
The goal of a persuasive speech is to encourage audience members to adopt a particular attitude or belief, or to perform an action or change a behavior. A persuasive speech cannot occur unless two or more points of view exist. Relevance and credibility are emphasized. In persuasion, personal conviction is extremely important. Topics must be timely, substantive, controversial, original and relevant to the audience. Additional objectives include learning how to select and organize evidence, structure arguments, refute counterarguments, incorporate persuasive appeals, and deliver the speech with conviction and professionalism.

Course Overview
School of Communication Speech Lab
A resource center is available to all students enrolled in Communication and Critical Inquiry who wish to improve their public speaking skills. The Speech Lab is located in Room 038 of Fell Hall (438-7028). Among the resources available to students are:


  • Videotape and playback facilities for practicing delivery.

  • Advice and techniques for reducing speech anxiety from Com 110 instructors.


Frequently Asked Questions
Q: What is the Speech Lab?

A: A place where you, as a Com 110 student, can practice your presentations, videotape them, and receive feedback from an instructor who teaches the course.
The lab's primary focus is to assist students with the polishing stages of their presentation rather than selecting topics, constructing outlines, preparing for an exam or portfolio assignment, or any other function that would be better served by the students' instructors during office hours.
Q: Why should I attend the lab?

A: The lab attendants are all trained Com 110 instructors, who use and provide feedback that follows the same criteria as your Com 110 instructor. Also, research conducted at ISU's Speech Lab has shown that students who utilize the lab receive better grades on their speeches than students who do not.
Q: What does it look like?

A: There are three rooms. Fell 38 is where students make appointments, as well as check-in and wait for appointments. Fell 34 and 36 are the two practice rooms; you will be assigned to one where you will practice your presentation with a lab attendant.
Q: How do I make an appointment?

A: You can call 438-7028 or come to Fell 38 and schedule an appointment in person. If you wish to videotape your presentation, please tell the attendant when booking your appointment. Remember to book your appointment early, as there are a great number of students trying to make appointments.
Q: What should I bring to my appointment?

A: You should bring your speaking notes or outline, visual/audio aids, and a videotape if you wish to videotape your presentation. You should also bring the Speech Lab Feedback Form on page 69 (for informative), page 70 (for group), or page 71 (for persuasive) in your spiral book as well as your I.S.U. student I.D.

Q: What if I need to cancel my appointment?

A: You should call the Speech Lab or stop by in person 24 hours prior to your appointment. Failure to do so will result in NOT being able to make an appointment or participate at the Speech Lab for the rest of the semester.
Course Overview
LEARNING RESOURCES AVAILABLE OUTSIDE OF THE CLASSROOM
University Center for Learning Assistance
The Center for Learning Assistance offers help to students in many academic areas. Staffed by undergraduate and graduate students, it provides flexible forms of instruction adaptable to student needs. Special areas of assistance include employing good study skills, planning and writing papers, reading texts critically, writing with a computer, taking objective exams, writing essay exams, and preparing for the University Writing Exam. The Center also maintains a resource library of handbooks, style manuals, dictionaries, and sample papers. The Center is located in 133 Stevenson Hall. Appointments may be scheduled by calling 438-7100.
Student Counseling Services

The mission of the Student Counseling Services (SCS) is to assist students in acquiring those values, attitudes, skills, and experiences which will enable them to maximize their opportunity for life-long academic, career, and personal development. The SCS provides comprehensive mental health services, life planning, and career development services related to the exploration, identification, and career preparation. The SCS also provides training opportunities for students at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The SCS staff works collaboratively with students, faculty, staff, and alumni/ae to provide these services to students. Staff of the SCS model respect for others, appreciation of individual differences, civility, and compassion toward others. The office is located in 320 Student Services Building. Appointments may be scheduled by calling 438-3655 or 438-5489 (TDD).

Office of Intercultural Programs and Services (OIPS)
The Office of Intercultural Programs and Services (OIPS) compliments the missions of the University and the Division of Student Affairs by fostering civility and raising cultural awareness in students, faculty and staff. OIPS facilitates a supportive campus environment in which underrepresented students can flourish academically and socially by participating in programs and taking advantage of services designed to better recruit, educate, and retain them. Building bridges between groups and the development of understanding, appreciation, and respect as well as celebration of the diversity of the members of the University community is of paramount importance. OIPS is responsible for initiating and encouraging programs that contribute to a broader understanding of diversity at Illinois State University. OIPS facilitates and promotes cultural and educational programs that celebrate, embrace and enhance student, faculty, and staff knowledge and understanding of individuals and groups that makeup the mosaic of American society and other nations. OIPS is located at 305 North School Street. Telephone number is 438-8968.
Minority Student Academic Center (MSAC)

The Minority Student Academic Center (MSAC), a component of University College, functions primarily to enhance the academic success and retention of minority undergraduates at Illinois State University by offering academic reinforcement in a designated location. The Center works collaboratively with various campus units to provide an array of inter-connected, coordinated academic support programs and services in a supportive, comfortable environment that is welcoming to all students enrolled at the University. The MSAC is located in the Campus Religious Center Building (210 W. Mulberry, across the street from Manchester Residence Hall). Telephone number is 438-3159.

Student Service and Referral Center (SSRC)
The Student Service and Referral Center (SSRC), the primary public service area of the Office of the University Registrar, is located in room 107 Moulton Hall.  The SSRC provides a variety of Registrar services to students, and refers students to other areas when appropriate. The SSRC is located in Moulton Hall. Telephone number is 438-2188

COURSE STRUCTURE
UNIT 1: IMMERSION
Purpose: The purpose of the first unit of the Communication and Critical Inquiry course is to expose students to a range of communication situations that will provide a foundation for communication skills development throughout the semester. Students are encouraged to reflect on their communication experiences as both speakers and listeners, as well as the importance of oral communication skills in all aspects of life. The first unit allows students to begin to identify critical elements present in most communication situations and to establish criteria for recognizing communication competence. Students complete a Communication Improvement Profile (including the Critical Thinking Self Assessment) in order to develop self-awareness and formulate self-improvement goals for the semester. Because performance classes may create anxiety for students, the unit also explores the common experience of communication anxiety and identifies strategies for managing anxiety.
Duration: 2 weeks
Unit Goals:
1) To acquaint students with critical elements present in most communication situations as well as elements particular to interpersonal, small group, and public speaking contexts.

2) To establish criteria for recognizing and enacting communication competence.

3) To introduce students to basic critical thinking skills and to illustrate the importance of these skills in a variety of communication situations.

4) To acquaint students with the concept of communication anxiety and identify strategies for managing anxiety.
5) To provide students with the information necessary to assess their communication strengths and weaknesses.
6) To aid students in the construction of their individualized Communication Improvement Profile and help them identify preliminary steps to reach their improvement goals over the semester.
7) To introduce students to the Portfolio assignment and provide them with examples from the several activities in this unit.
UNIT 2: MESSAGE CLARITY

Purpose: Although the goals that guide individuals during various types of interactions will vary with features of the participants, constraints of the context, and definitions of the episode, the most fundamental requirement for goal attainment in every situation is message clarity. For verbal and nonverbal messages, as well as for factual and emotional information, clarity is essential for communicative success. In this unit, students will practice creating messages directed toward the functions of informing, describing, explaining, and problem solving. They will develop skills in producing concise, well-formed, and listener-adapted messages. They will also practice skills in listening for the main points of messages, in separating the content of the message from biases of the speaker, and in producing questions that clarify the messages of others. In addition, students will become acquainted with basic information literacy skills. Although these skills will be practiced in relatively uncomplicated interactions during this unit (e.g., giving a brief informative speech), they are fundamental to all forms of interaction. Instances include receiving or giving feedback in the workplace, managing conflict in social and personal relationships, decision-making during group meetings, and resisting inappropriate compliance-gaining attempts of others.


Course Structure

UNIT 2: MESSAGE CLARITY, Continued
Duration: 5 weeks
Unit Goals:
1) To provide students with opportunities to enact, practice, and evaluate the success of messages directed to the functions of informing, describing, explaining, and problem solving.
2) To enhance students' skills in producing concise, accurate, well-formed, and goal-relevant messages.
3) To increase students' awareness of the importance of language in message clarity and accuracy.
4) To provide students with the opportunity to practice message precision in asking specific, critical, and informative questions.
5) To provide students with practice in translating difficult concepts from one presentational form to another (e.g., from graphs to verbal descriptions and vice versa).


  1. To introduce students to the basic structures of an argument and relate this to organizing clear messages.




  1. To introduce students to the basic information literacy skills and relate this to organizing clear messages.

8) To provide students with opportunities to practice skills in listening for the main points of messages, and in separating the content of message from biases of the speaker.


9) To provide students with the opportunity to practice message clarity in content and delivery in the public speaking domain by presenting several short informative speeches.

10) To provide students with the opportunity to practice message clarity in the process of problem-solving in the small group domain, specifically the skills of identifying the problem, stating the problem precisely, translating the problem into new terms (other perspectives, etc.), identifying possible solutions, and specifying evaluation procedures.

UNIT 3: MESSAGE RESPONSIVENESS
Purpose: Unit 2 emphasized speaking with clarity and listening for comprehension. These two processes are necessary for all interactions to move toward shared meaning, but they are not sufficient. When speakers' public identities, private self-concepts, or emotions are tied to the issues being discussed or presented to a group, both the speaking and listening processes become more complicated. In such cases, messages need to be carefully directed to the relevant issues and yet remain responsive to the concerns of others. Similarly, when acting as a listener, personal agendas (of the moment or long term) must be set aside long enough to "hear" the needs and concerns of the other person(s).

Unit 3 emphasizes the related functions of perspective-taking, empathy, seeking and providing comfort and social support, managing conflict, and moving competently through the various group roles that facilitate the decision-making process. In a very real sense, the ability to function effectively as a group member while making difficult decisions (e.g., to be task leader, socio-emotional leader, tension reliever, etc.) requires students to have mastery over the component functions of perspective-taking, empathy, support provision, and conflict management. In addition, because context variables such as cultural and gender differences in communication experiences, expectations, and practices may complicate interactions, students practice communicating with persons who are members of American co-cultures.


Course Structure
UNIT 3: MESSAGE RESPONSIVENESS, Continued
Duration: 4 weeks
Unit Goals:

1) To encourage students to practice the skills of producing messages that are responsive to the concerns of others, respectful of the rights of others to complete and accurate information, and sensitive to individual and cultural differences (i.e., ethical communication).

2) Similarly, when acting as listeners, students will learn that personal agendas must be set aside long enough to "hear" the needs and concerns of the other person(s).
4) To provide students the opportunity to practice the various mechanisms through which the perspective of others may be taken (e.g., techniques for audience analysis, how to role shift during conflict, how to seek and provide social support, and how to manage the multiple voice and perspectives that arise during small group decision-making processes).
5) To introduce students to features of intercultural and intergender communication that may affect interactions.
6) To help students identify and control perceptual barriers that hinder their ability to adapt their messages to others.
7) To practice the skills of constructive criticism and providing feedback.
8) To practice conflict management strategies.
UNIT 4: PERSUASIVE COMMUNICATION

Purpose: This unit is designed to help students understand the persuasive process, both as speakers who wish to influence others and as listeners who wish to resist persuasive attempts when necessary. It builds upon the previous unit, Message Responsiveness, in that effective persuasion requires sensitivity to the needs and perspective of others. Students construct and deliver persuasive messages in both formal and informal settings. Emphasis is also placed on understanding and evaluating the positions and messages of others. The foundation of this unit is based on traditional rhetorical theories, as well as modern views and research in persuasion. The student will gain an understanding of persuasion/attitude change processes, which will be reinforced through the use of short in-class presentations, activities, demonstrations, practice, and actual delivery of major presentations. In sum, this unit trains the students to set persuasive goals, to analyze their audience, and to use that information to construct or resist persuasive messages that meet their goals in the interpersonal, small group, and public communication contexts.

Duration: 4 weeks
Course Structure

UNIT 4: PERSUASIVE COMMUNICATION, Continued
Unit Goals:
1) To enhance students' understanding of the persuasive process, both as speakers who wish to influence others in an ethical manner, and as listeners who wish to resist illegitimate persuasive attempts.
2) To give students practice in constructing and delivering persuasive messages in both formal and informal settings.
3) To give students experience in setting ethical persuasion goals, analyzing their audience, and using that information to meet their goals in the interpersonal, small group, and public communication contexts.
4) To acquaint students with logical patterns of organization of varying degrees of complexity in persuasive messages.
5) To illustrate the role of speaker credibility in designing and delivering persuasive messages.
6) To provide students with the opportunity to practice delivery techniques/nonverbal behaviors that enhance or maintain a speaker's credibility.
7) To give students practice in the use of argument analysis and evaluation techniques to identify and analyze audience factors when preparing for a persuasive presentation.
8) To give students the opportunity to practice skills involved in anticipating audience questions/objections and producing effective responses (i.e., preemptive argumentation).
UNIT 5: COURSE SYNTHESIS

Purpose: This unit provides students with the opportunity to synthesize and critically reflect upon what they have learned and experienced throughout the semester/year. Early in the semester each student developed a personal Communication Improvement Profile. This profile provided them with a personal agenda to pursue throughout the semester. Students re-visit their initial profile and reflect on their progress toward their improvement goals. They set new goals to pursue based on their progress and develop an action plan for practicing these skills in the future. This unit also clearly demonstrates for students the intricate relationships between their experiences in ENG and COM.

Duration: 1 week
Unit Goals:
1) To provide students with the opportunity to critically reflect on their growth over the semester and to evaluate progress toward meeting their improvement goals.
2) To provide students with the opportunity to project areas of continued growth in the future.
3) To reinforce the importance of the year long ENG/COM sequence.

OUTLINE FORMAT
The organizational structure below illustrates the typical format that a speech outline follows. However, students should recognize that the actual number of main points and the organizational pattern of the body of a speech will vary with topic, content, and general purpose (i.e., to inform or to persuade).
Topic
Purpose:
Thesis:
Organizational Pattern:
I. Introduction
A. Attention Getter

B. Relevance of topic to audience

C. Credibility

D. Thesis/Central Idea

E. Preview
Transition
II. Body
A. First Main Point (e.g., the first topic in a topical organizational pattern or statement of the problem in a problem-cause-solution organizational pattern)
1. Development/Support (e.g., illustration, evidence, statistics, narrative)

Citation


Visual Aid if appropriate
2. Development/Support (e.g., illustration, evidence, statistics, narrative)

Citation


Visual Aid if appropriate
3. If necessary
Transition
B. Second Main Point (e.g., the second topic in a topical organizational pattern or description of the cause in a problem-cause-solution organizational pattern)
1. Development/Support (e.g., illustration, evidence, statistics, narrative)

Citation


Visual Aid if appropriate

2. Development/Support (e.g., illustration, evidence, statistics, narrative)

Citation


Visual Aid if appropriate
3. If necessary

Outline Format for Informative and Persuasive Speeches

Transition
C. Third Main Point (e.g., the third topic in a topical organizational pattern or description of the solution in a problem-cause-solution organizational pattern)
1. Development/Support (e.g., illustration, evidence, statistics, narrative)

Citation


Visual Aid if appropriate
2. Development/Support (e.g., illustration, evidence, statistics, narrative)

Citation


Visual Aid if appropriate
3. If necessary

Transition

D. Call to Action (Action Step), for persuasive speech



III. Conclusion

A. Thesis/Summary



B. Memorable Close
References (on separate page)

Outline Format for Informative and Persuasive Speeches
OUTLINE FOR INFORMATIVE SPEECH “A”

Roman Coliseum
Specific Purpose: To inform the audience about the Roman Coliseum.
Thesis/Central Idea: To truly understand the historical impact the Coliseum has had on civilization, it is important to learn of the architectural wonders of the Coliseum, the terror of the Roman Games, and the present plans for its restoration.
Organizational Pattern: Topical
I. Introduction
A. Attention Getter: Imagine yourself being ushered up a dark hallway and into a huge, outdoor theatre. Here you are greeted by 50,000 screaming spectators and one man—crazy for your death, hungry for the thought of ripping you apart limb from limb. You and Blood Thirsty are the only ones inside an arena encompassed by a 15-foot wall, and the 50,000 people are waiting for you to die.

B. Relevance: From professional football and basketball games to the sporting events at ISU’s Redbird Arena, much of our culture is influenced by the success of one great sports arena built nearly 2000 years ago. The author Alan Baker, in his book, The Gladiator, published in 2001, makes the connection between the ancient Roman games and our culture today. Our own athletes, he states, “…are merely the pale echoes of the ancient fighters… [they] display their skill and aggression before thousands of screaming spectators, with millions more watching on television. This is exactly what happened in the ancient world.”


C. Credibility: As a history major focused on Roman studies, I have always been enamored with the stories surrounding the Coliseum. Further, a tour of Ancient Rome this past summer intensified my horror and fascination with this great monument.

D. Thesis: To truly understand the historical impact the Coliseum has had on civilization, it is important to learn of the architectural wonders of the Coliseum, the terror of the Roman Games, and the present plans for its restoration.

E. Preview: Therefore, [show transparency] we will first, lay the foundation by describing its design and construction, next, live through a day at the games, and finally, learn of the present plans to restore and renovate this ancient monument to its original glory.
Transition: To begin, we will lay the foundation by describing its design and construction.



Share with your friends:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   14
:)


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2019
send message

    Main page

:)