Com 110 overview purpose the overall purpose of the Communication and Critical Inquiry

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References (separate page)

Davies-Jones, R. (1995). Tornadoes: The storms that spawn twisters are now largely understood, but mysteries still remain about how these violent vortices form. Scientific American, 273(2), 48-58.

Grazulis, T. (1995). Chasing tornado oddities. In L. Sessions (Ed.), 1996 Weather Guide Calendar with Phenomenal Weather Events. Denver, CO: Accord Publishing.

Ludlum, D. M. (1997). National Audubon Society field guide to North American weather. New York: Chanticleer Press.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (1995). Tornadoes: Nature's most violent storms [Brochure]. Washington, DC: National Weather Service.

Tornado Project Online. (2000, June 19). The top ten U.S. killer tornadoes. Retrieved August 5, 2000, from http://www.tornadoproject.com/

USA Today Tornado Information. (2000, June 20). Understanding tornadoes. [On-Line]. Retrieved August 7, 2000, from http://www.usatoday.com/weather/tornado/wtwist0.htm

AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION (APA) STYLE GUIDE
Students should become familiar with the American Psychological Association (APA) style guide for citations. It is the format used when citing sources in speeches and papers in the Communication and Critical Inquiry. The sample reference list provided below should be used as a guide. It contains examples of the most common sources used in speeches. Notations are provided in the right hand margin to point out features in each entry. Students who wish additional background may purchase a copy of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, Fifth Edition, at the bookstore.

References

Baxter, L. A. (1987). Cognition and communication in the relationship process. In R. Burnett, P. McGhee, & D. Clarke (Eds.), Accounting for relationships: Explanation, representation, and knowledge (pp. 192-212). London: Methuen.

Conville, R. L. (1991). Relational transitions: The evolution of personal relationships. New York: Praeger.


Brown, P., & Levinson, S. (1987). Politeness: Some universals in language usage. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Fidelity Investments. (1993). Fidelity Brokerage Services handbook (5th ed.). Boston: Author.
Cappella, J. N. (1994). The management of conversational interaction in adults and infants. (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
Bekerian, D. A. (1993). In search of the typical eyewitness. American Psychologist, 50, 574-576.

Klimoski, R., & Palmer, S. (1993). The ADA and the hiring process in organizations. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 45(2), 10-36.

Fox, R. W., & Lears, T. J. J. (Eds.). (1993). The power of culture: Critical

essays in American history. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Chapter in edited book


  • Last name of author, then initials

  • Initials of editors, then last names

  • No quotation marks

  • Only first word in chapter is in caps

  • First word and following a colon are capitalized for book title


Book by one author


Book by two or more authors

  • Ampersand between names

  • Place of publication before publisher


Corporate author

Book edition other than the first


Journal article, one author

  • No quotation marks around title

  • No pp. for pages



Journal article, two or more authors

Editor or Compiler

Bergmann, P. G. (1993). Relativity. In The new encyclopedia Britannica (Vol. 26, pp. 501-508). Chicago: Encyclopedia Britannica.


Heimlich, R., & Anderson, W. (2001, August). Development at and beyond the urban fringe: Impacts on agriculture. [Electronic version]. Agricultural Outlook, 5, 15-18.
Haskins, R. (2001). Giving is not enough: Work and work supports are reducing poverty. Brookings Review, 19, 13-15. Retrieved August 10, 2001, from http://www.brook.edu/PUB/REVIEW/REVDES.HTM

Fine, K. (2001, June). The question of realism. Philosopher's Imprint, 1, Article 0001a. Retrieved August 10, 2001, from http://www.umich.edu/~philos/Imprint/browse.html

Brown, S. G., & David, S. (2000). Putting on a new face on self-sufficiency programs. American Journal of Public Health, 90, 1383-1384. Retrieved August 10, 2001, from PsycINFO database.
New drug appears to sharply cut risk of death from heart failure. (1993, July 15). The Washington Post, p. A12.
Schwartz, J. (1993, September 30). Obesity affects economic, social status. The Washington Post, pp. A1, A4.
Berkowitz, A. D. (2001, November 24). How to tackle the problem of

student drinking [Letter to the editor]. The Chronicle of Higher Education, p. B20.


Posner, M. I. (1993, October 29). Seeing the mind. Science, 262, 673-674.
APA Style Guide for References
Encyclopedia entry

On-line journal

(When electronic and print versions are identical)



On-line journal

(When electronic and print versions differ)



On-line journal

(Not otherwise available in print)


Articles or abstracts from Electronic databases

  • Used to cite full-text articles or abstracts from fee-based Article databases such as Academic Universe (Lexis-Nexis), JSTOR, and PsycINFO



Daily newspaper, no author


Daily newspaper, discontinuous pages


Weekly newspaper article,

Letter to the editor
Magazine article

Crystal, L. (Executive Producer). (1993, October 11). The MacNeil/Lehrer news hour [Television broadcast]. New York and Washington, DC: Public Broadcasting Service.

Scorsese, M. (Producer), & Longergan, K. (Writer/Director). (2000).

You can count on me [Motion picture]. United States:

Paramount Pictures.


Costa, P. T., Jr. (Speaker). (1988). Personality, continuity, and changes of adult life (Cassette Recording No. 207-433-88A-B). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
Felmlee, D. H., & Greenberg, S. F. (1996, August). The couple as a dynamic system: A formal model. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, New York, NY.
Research and Training Center on Independent Living. (1993).Guidelines for reporting and writing about people with disabilities (4th ed.).

[Brochure]. Lawrence, KS: Author.


B. Nelson. (personal communication, May 6, 1996).
Vogler, E. (1999). Using technology in the classroom. Retrieved October 1, 2001, from www.tech.com/swiz/htm
APA Style Guide for References

Television broadcast
Motion Picture

Audio Recording

Unpublished paper

Brochure

Interview

Internet source

  • Use n.d. (no date) when a publication date is not available

ONLINE RESOURCES

For citing online sources, please consult the Milner Library website at www.mlb.ilstu.edu.

*Note: The one exception to standard APA format is the placement of citations for interviews. The APA style manual

suggests that interviews be cited only in the text of the speech. However, for Communication and Critical Inquiry courses,

interviews should be included in the reference list as well. You may also access the APA Citation Wizard on the Internet

at the following address: http://www.stylewizard.com.

* Note: When orally citing a website, cite the title, who maintains the website, and when the site was last updated and/or when you accessed the website.




Information Literacy: Oral Citation Guide

When preparing your speeches, you must use at least four sources for the Informative Speech, six sources for the Persuasive Speech, and ten sources for the Group Speech. No more than half of the sources you use should be taken from the Internet. Attach a separate page entitled "References" to the outline and be sure that all references conform to the APA style guidelines in the packet. All of the sources that appear in the reference page must be incorporated into the speech and cited orally. The oral citation in a speech should contain the following elements:


1. Author

2. Credibility Statement for the Author

3. Date of Publication

4. Source Information


Each of these elements will be evaluated carefully. In order to earn an "A" in this category, all four must be present. Your instructor will provide several examples of how this should be completed (look in the spiral packet--the "A" outlines for the tornado and Roman speeches, oral citation is also covered in the description of the informative speech assignment, and you will watch several video examples of how to cite sources in class).
Sample Oral Citations
Internet Source with No Author
In fact, according to Tornado Project Online! (Source), a website hosted by a company that gathers tornado information for tornado researchers (Credibility), accessed earlier this month (Date), the deadliest tornado in U.S. recorded history occurred in Murphysboro, Illinois. In 1925 a violent tornado killed 234 people in this Southern Illinois town.
Book

According to renowned weather historian (Credibility) Dr. David Ludlum (Author), author of the 1997 (Date) edition of the National Audubon Societies Field Guide to North American Weather (Source), tornado researchers use a scale, known as the Fujita-Pearson Tornado Intensity Scale (named after its creators) to rate the intensity of tornadoes.

Journal Article
In addition, astrogeophysicist (Credibility) Dr. Robert Davies-Jones (Author) notes in a 1995 (Date) edition of Scientific American (Source) that most tornadoes have damage paths 150 feet wide, move at about 30 miles per hour and last only a few minutes.

Informative Speech Assignment
INFORMATIVE SPEECH ASSIGNMENT

Purpose
To communicate information about an object, a process, an event or a concept accurately, clearly, and interestingly.
Time Limits
Time limits will vary according to number of students in a class. In general, however, most speeches will be approximately 5-7 minutes. Some instructors also require a brief (1-2 minute) question and answer period following the speech; this time may be considered part of the total time limit or may be an addition to the speaking time allowed. Points will be deducted for not meeting the minimum time or exceeding the maximum time allowed.
Point Value
The informative speech is worth 100 total points. Please review the Informative Speech Evaluation form in this packet to see how points are distributed. You will need to attach this form to your outline and references and hand them to the instructor just prior to your presentation.
Outline
You will provide a typed outline which conforms to the format provided in this packet. If you choose to use the outline while presenting, make an additional copy.
References

You must use at least four sources when preparing your speech. No more than half of the sources you use should be taken from the internet. Attach a separate page entitled "References" to the outline and be sure that all references conform to the APA style guidelines in the packet. All of the sources that appear in the reference page must be incorporated into the speech and identified. For example, a speaker might say, "According to Dr. Vincent Rainey in his book, Keeping Fit published in 1996, it only takes 30 minutes of exercise three times a week to maintain good cardiovascular health." Or a speaker might say, "In May of 1998, Time magazine published an article written by staff correspondent Mildred Blair in which she describes four hints for living well at college on a student budget."

Research
Obtain Com 110 research assistance by accessing Milner Library’s General Education web page: http://www.library.ilstu.edu/gened/
Videotape
You must provide a videotape which is labeled and cued for your presentation. Indicate on the label if there is a practice session from the speech lab already on the tape.
Attire
This is a formal presentation that will be videotaped. Dress appropriately for the situation and your topic.

Informative Speech Assignment
Audio/Visual Aids
You may be required to incorporate at least one audio/visual aid into your presentation. A visual aid might be a transparency, a slide, an object, a clip from a movie, a clip from a television program or special broadcast, or an audio recording of a song, conversation, radio personality, etc. Be sure to practice your speech using the visual aid to make sure the equipment works and the audio/visual aid can be incorporated during the speech unobtrusively.

Instructional Technology Passport: As part of a new Performance-Based Assessment System, students at Illinois State University are expected to demonstrate the ability to use instructional technology appropriately. For complete information about the expectations, please visit the Instructional Technology Passport System web site at http://www.itps.ilstu.edu

In Com 110, you will be required to demonstrate proficiency in using Presentation Authoring tools (competency #3). You will use Microsoft PowerPoint to create a visual aid for your Informative Speech. If you do not meet the requirements in this speech, you may try again in your Persuasive Speech. If you do not meet the requirements a second time, a deficiency will be reported to the ITPS. If you are a teacher education major, you will need to make provisions for demonstrating this competency before you are admitted into the Professional Studies program.

Peer Evaluations
Each presentation will not only be graded by the instructor, but will also be critiqued by two peers. In turn, each student will be responsible for evaluating two presentations. The Peer Evaluation forms for the Informative Speech are provided in this packet. Please take these out of your packet and have them ready to complete on speech days.
Ethical Communication
Ethical communication will be demonstrated at all times during a speech. No one will enter or leave the room during a presentation, and the audience will be attentive and respectful.
Assignment Dates
A make-up policy for speeches is detailed in the syllabus. Make-up presentations will be allowed only if prior arrangements have been made and documentation provided. All students must present every speech (in front of an audience) in order to pass the class.
Notes from the Instructor and Special Requirements:
The time limits for your speech will be ______ to ______ minutes.
Question/answer period required? If yes, how long? _______ minutes
Audio/visual aids required? If yes, how many? _______
Other requirements:


Informative Speech Assignment
INSTRUCTOR EVALUATION FORM: INFORMATIVE SPEECH

Name: Topic:


OUTLINE AND REFERENCES (10 pts.)

Follows Outline Format

References correct/sufficient

pts.



INTRODUCTION (20 pts.)

Gained attention

Showed relevance of topic to audience

Established credibility

Introduced topic/thesis statement clearly

Previewed body of speech



pts.


BODY (30 pts.)

Main points clear

Strong evidence & supporting material

Organization effective

Language precise, clear, powerful

Transitions effective

Sources are well integrated,

credible, & cited fully

pts.



CONCLUSION (10 pts.)

Audience prepared for conclusion

Purpose & main points reviewed

Closed speech by reference to

intro./other devices

pts.



DELIVERY (15 pts.)

Maintained eye contact

Used voice, diction, & rate for maximum effect

Used space, movement,

& gestures for emphasis
pts.



OVERALL IMPRESSION (15 pts.)

Topic challenging

Adapted to audience

Maintained time limits

Evidence of preparation & practice

Quality & relevance of visual aids

Was informative

ITPS met/not met _______ pts.




TOTAL POINTS __________

Informative Speech Assignment
INSTRUCTOR EVALUATION FORM: INFORMATIVE SPEECH

Name: Topic:


OUTLINE AND REFERENCES (10 pts.)

Follows Outline Format

References correct/sufficient

pts.



INTRODUCTION (20 pts.)

Gained attention

Showed relevance of topic to audience

Established credibility

Introduced topic/thesis statement clearly

Previewed body of speech



pts.



BODY (30 pts.)

Main points clear

Strong evidence & supporting material

Organization effective

Language precise, clear, powerful

Transitions effective

Sources are well integrated,

credible, & cited fully

pts.




CONCLUSION (10 pts.)

Audience prepared for conclusion

Purpose & main points reviewed

Closed speech by reference to

intro./other devices

pts.



DELIVERY (15 pts.)

Maintained eye contact

Used voice, diction, & rate for maximum effect

Used space, movement,

& gestures for emphasis
pts.



OVERALL IMPRESSION (15 pts.)

Topic challenging

Adapted to audience

Maintained time limits

Evidence of preparation & practice

Quality & relevance of visual aids

Was informative

ITPS met/not met



pts.

TOTAL POINTS

Informative Speech Assignment

PEER EVALUATION FORM
Informative Speech

You are asked to respond to the speaker's presentation. Use the back of this sheet if necessary. Please be as honest as possible, providing both positive comments and tactful, constructive suggestions for improvement. Since specific comments are more useful to the speaker, please avoid generalities.


Speaker: ______________________ Topic: ______________________ Evaluator: __________________________

1. How was the speech made relevant to this audience? Was it adequately audience-oriented? Explain.


2. Comment on the speaker's organization. Was a preview included? What about transitions? Were you able to follow the speech? Were there gaps in any of the arguments presented? Did the speaker commit any logical fallacies? Explain.

3. How was the topic developed, clarified, and illustrated? Was this development sufficient? Did the speaker’s evidence pass the three tests of evidence (bias, timeliness, and credibility)? Did the speaker follow the guide for citing sources orally in the speech? Explain.

4. Comment on the speaker's delivery (eye contact, gesturing, tone, rate, fluency, facial expression, stance, confidence, enthusiasm) and overall preparedness.
5. Comment on at least 3 strengths of this presentation.

a.

b.


c.
6. Make 3 suggestions for improvement.
a.
b.
c.

Informative Speech Assignment


PEER EVALUATION FORM
Informative Speech

You are asked to respond to the speaker's presentation. Use the back of this sheet if necessary. Please be as honest as possible, providing both positive comments and tactful, constructive suggestions for improvement. Since specific comments are more useful to the speaker, please avoid generalities.


Speaker: ______________________ Topic: ______________________ Evaluator: __________________________

1. How was the speech made relevant to this audience? Was it adequately audience-oriented? Explain.


2. Comment on the speaker's organization. Was a preview included? What about transitions? Were you able to follow the speech? Were there gaps in any of the arguments presented? Did the speaker commit any logical fallacies? Explain.
3. How was the topic developed, clarified, and illustrated? Was this development sufficient? Did the speaker’s evidence pass the three tests of evidence (bias, timeliness, and credibility)? Did the speaker follow the guide for citing sources orally in the speech? Explain.
4. Comment on the speaker's delivery (eye contact, gesturing, tone, rate, fluency, facial expression, stance, confidence, enthusiasm) and overall preparedness.
5. Comment on at least 3 strengths of this presentation.

a.

b.


c.
6. Make 3 suggestions for improvement.
a.
b.

c.
Informative Speech Assignment

SELF EVALUATION: INFORMATIVE SPEECH
Option 1

Name: ____________________ Topic: _________________________________




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