Com 110 overview purpose the overall purpose of the Communication and Critical Inquiry


INTERVIEW AS A BIOGRAPHY PRESENTATION

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INTERVIEW AS A BIOGRAPHY PRESENTATION


Purpose:
To begin the process of audience analysis as well as to “break the ice” of completing the first “speech.” Also, to provide students the opportunity to see what it is like to stand in front of an audience.
Assignment:
Students will meet with another student and “interview” him or her. Once the students have learned some interesting facts about each other, they introduce the other to the class in a creative way.
Evaluation:
The assignment is for points. Students must stand in front of the class for at least one minute (no longer than 2 minutes). If students finish their presentation before the time limit, then the class can ask them questions to finish the allotted time. Basically, if students have “interviewed” the other student, introduced him or her to the class within the time limit, they get the full amount of points.
Hints to Students:
Practice. Make sure you know exactly what you want to say, when you want to say it, and (most importantly) how you want to finish it. Make sure your presentation is at least one minute long. Silence can be very uncomfortable. Some former students say this is the most difficult assignment of the semester, so from here on out is smooth sailing. Good luck!
Optional Handouts
Critical Thinking: Asking the Right Questions About How You Think
1. Name three things you have seen in movies that tend to give people a distorted view of the world. Discuss how they are misleading. Give an example of each. Now, name three things you have seen in the movies that have been seriously misleading for you. Explain briefly how they were misleading.

2. Give an example of a situation where your emotions led you in the wrong direction. Then give an example of a situation where your emotions led you in the right direction. In terms of critical thinking, how do you explain the difference?

3. Thinking versus reflective thinking. Write down three questions you think about often (at least one should focus on the means to a certain end). Next, formulate the questions reflectively, using the concepts of consequences (What are the potential implications of answering the question one way versus another?), assumptions (What assumptions are you making in answering these questions a particular way?), or alternatives (Are there reasonable alternative answers to these questions?).
Optional Handouts
Critical Thinking: Questioning Assumptions
Objective:
To have students discuss common social assumptions, assess the reasoning behind such assumptions, and suggest alternative explanations.
Summary:
Students discuss social assumptions as a class and in groups. They evaluate possible reasons each assumption is generally accepted and suggest other possible explanations, causes, or relationships.
Directions:
1. A social assumption is a statement which most people accept as true. A social assumption may or may not be based on the conclusions of tests and may or may not have a strong factual basis. Indeed, a social assumption may be based on fact, but it is often the case that many people accept the statement for incorrect reasons.
2. Consider the following assumption: “Most scientists are men because men are better scientists.” Your task is to provide alternative explanations. If there are multiple factors, do they work independently or do they interact?
3. Divide the class into groups and have each group discuss the three assumptions on the list. Have them suggest two or three alternative explanations for each.
4. After each group has finished their discussions, discuss the alternative explanations as a group. Do the suggestions actually explain the social assumptions?

Sample Social Assumptions

1. Children who grow up in the center of a city do not do as well as in school as children in the suburbs.
2. Most traffic accidents happen within two miles of the driver’s home.
3. The suicide rate is higher in larger cities than in small towns or rural areas.
4. Since the 1960s, the average global temperature has dropped approximately two to seven degrees.
Optional Handouts
COMMUNICATION APPREHENSION (CA)
Definition: an individual’s level of fear or anxiety associated with either real or anticipated communication with another person or persons.

Causes of CA





  1. Heredity

  2. Modeling

  3. Childhood Reinforcement

  4. Skills Deficit

Effects of CA

  1. Internal

  1. Psychological

  2. Physiological

  1. External

  1. Avoidance

  2. Withdrawal

  3. Disruption

Treatments for CA

  1. Systematic Desensitization

  2. Cognitive Restructuring

  3. Skills Training


Optional Handouts

COMMUNICATION APPREHENSION

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS


  1. Why are people afraid to speak in public?




  1. What happens to people who are anxious?




  1. What, in your experiences, has helped you to overcome anxiety?

Optional Handouts

Evaluation Challenge

An Exercise in Critical Thinking



Procedures



  1. Submit a written appeal




  • Identify the issue in question (e.g. outline, delivery, test item)

  • Develop a well written argument for why you feel the grade should be changed (please reference any class materials, i.e. assignment sheets, textual information to support your argument.)


Written appeals must be clear, concise, and meet the requirements of all other paper submissions as detailed as your syllabus. Appeals will not be considered without meeting these requirements.


  1. Schedule an appointment with me




  • Written appeals must be submitted before or at the time of the meeting

  • If you fail to make your scheduled appointment, without prior notice, your appeal will not be considered.

  • You must make an appointment no later than one full class week after the grade in questions has been returned.




  1. Make your case




  • You must bring in your graded copy of the item in question (e.g. quiz, speech evaluation form).

  • You must bring in any evidence to support your claim and be ready to present them.

  • You will be notified of my decision to change or uphold the grade before or after the next class session.


This procedure is designed to allow students to become an active agent in their own learning process. It is important that every student understands they are not given a grade, but rather, earn one.

If you disagree with a grade you receive in this course, it is your responsibility, your right, to explain why, as long as this is done in an appropriate and constructive way.

Please use this tool to your advantage.

Optional Handouts
Alcohol, Drug, and Violence Prevention Curriculum Infusion Project

Possible Topics for Student Presentations

Project Information:
The Alcohol, Tobacco and other Drug Curriculum Infusion Project was established at Illinois State University in 1994 through a federal grant in response to growing concern over ISU student abuse of alcohol and other drugs. Curriculum infusion project participants are faculty who voluntarily integrate substance abuse prevention content where there is a natural fit into regularly offered courses. Today, the project purpose has been expanded to not only reduce excessive drinking and drug use by our students but also to reduce campus violence, especially sexual abuse and assault. Critical to this project is ongoing faculty documentation of infusion efforts and number of students in courses/sections where substance abuse and sexual assault/abuse prevention information is infused.
Directions:
Below is a list of a variety of alcohol, drug and violence prevention topics/issues for students who are seeking individual and group presentation topics. Students, faculty and staff may obtain resource materials at the Health Stop Resource Center located in Room 228, Student Services Building (438-5613); the website is www.shs.ilstu.edu/hpo.
If someone chooses one of these topics, go to the Health Stop Resource Center. Once there, students should report that they are conducting research for speeches in Com 110. This information will later be used to assess the project.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Kerri Calvert, Coordinator of the Health Promotion Office, Student Health Service, Campus Box 2450 (phone number 438-7273; email kecalve@ilstu.edu). In advance, thank you for your participation in this project.

Curriculum Infusion Project Topics:
1. To inform others about something not currently familiar or known by them

Addictive personality

Alcoholism: a genetic disease

Children of alcoholics (COAs)

Risk reduction philosophy for alcohol prevention

Server training in licensed alcohol establishments (responsible beverage service)

“Shoulder tap” campaigns

Social host liability laws

The Core Alcohol and Drug Survey (for higher education populations)

ISU's policy on Sexual Misconduct (Assault)

Relationship between alcohol and sexual assault

Sexual assault prevention and risk-reduction strategies

High tolerance as a risk factor for alcohol related problems

Optional Handouts

2. To inform as a group about a controversial, multifaceted issue (topic has various perspectives, such as economic, social, legal, cultural, etc.) Small group effort
Alcohol advertising in college newspapers/alcohol marketing in general

Alcohol-free residence halls

Alcohol-free tailgating parties

Offering core college courses on Fridays and Saturdays

Legalization of abused drugs

Required registration of keg sales

Intoxication and sexual consent

Impact of sexual victimization

Traditional social roles and their contribution to sexual assault

Impact of social norms on a campus drinking culture

Environmental management as a tool to combat the campus drinking culture

3. To persuade by advocating for a position on, solution or approach to a recent, controversial, multifaceted issue

Alcohol poisoning and death

Alcohol drinking and memory loss

Alcohol advertising in college newspapers/alcohol marketing in general

Alcohol-free residence halls

Alcohol-free tailgating parties

Offering core college courses on Fridays and Saturdays

Legalization of abused drugs

Required registration of keg sales

Intoxication and sexual consent

Impact of sexual victimization

Traditional social roles and their contribution to sexual assault

Impact of social norms on a campus drinking culture

Environmental management as a tool to combat the campus drinking culture



Optional Handouts

Name:
Topic Selection Worksheet



Informative Speech


  1. Topic Description




  • Identify and briefly describe your topic:

­­­­__________________________________________________________________


  • Provide a brief rationale for selecting this topic:



  1. Research Strategy




  • What information do you need to find?


  • Is this information on the Internet? If so, is this a credible source? If not, where else might you look for information?


Optional Handouts



  1. Audience Analysis




  • Why is this an important topic for this audience? How is this topic relevant to this audience?




  • What do they (the audience) already know about the topic?



  • What is the audience’s needs and interests?



  • How will you adapt your claims/sources to the audience (remember, this needs to be done throughout the speech?)


Optional Handouts



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