Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: Learning, teaching, assessment Structured overview of all cefr scales



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Common European Framework of Reference for Languages:

Learning, teaching, assessment

Structured overview of all CEFR scales

 The copyright of the descriptive scales and the illustrative scales (in all languages) reproduced in this document belongs to the Council of Europe.

Publishers should ask permission prior to using these instruments, and they must mention the copyright.


Table of contents

1 Common Reference Levels

1.1 Global scale 5

1.2 Self-assessment grid 6

1.3 Qualitative aspects of spoken language use 7

2 Illustrative scales

2.1 Communicative Activities:

Reception Spoken Overall Listening Comprehension 8

Understanding Interaction between Native Speakers. 8

Listening as a Member of a Live Audience 9

Listening to Announcements & Instructions 9

Listening to Radio & Audio Recordings 9

Audio/Visual Watching TV & Film 10

Written Overall Reading Comprehension 10

Reading Correspondence 11

Reading for Orientation 11

Reading for Information and Argument 11

Reading Instructions 12

Interaction Spoken Overall Spoken Interaction 12

Understanding a Native Speaker Interlocutor 13

Conversation 13

Informal Discussion 14

Formal Discussion (Meetings) 15

Goal-oriented Co-operation 16

Obtaining Goods and Services 17

Information Exchange 18

Interviewing & Being Interviewed 19

Written Overall Written Interaction 19

Correspondence 19

Notes, Messages & Forms 20
Production Spoken Overall Spoken Production 20

Sustained Monologue: Describing Experience 21

Sustained Monologue: Putting a Case (e.g. Debate) 21

Public Announcements 22

Addressing Audiences 22

Written Overall Written Production 23

Creative Writing 23

Writing Reports and Essays 24

2.2 Communication Strategies

Reception Identifying Cues and Inferring 24

Interaction Taking the Floor (Turntaking) 25

Co-operating 25

Asking for Clarification 25

Production Planning 25

Compensating 26

Monitoring and Repair 26

2.3 Working with Text

Text Notetaking in Seminars and Lectures 26

Processing Text 26
2.4 Communicative Language Competence

Linguistic Range

General Range 27

Vocabulary Range 27

Control

Grammatical Accuracy 28

Vocabulary Control 28

Phonological Control 28

Orthographic Control 29

Sociolinguistic

Sociolinguistic 29



Pragmatic

Flexibility 30

Taking the Floor (Turntaking) – repeated 30

Thematic Development 30

Coherence 31

Propositional Precision 31



Spoken Fluency 31
Appendix: The hierarchy of scales 32
1 Common Reference Levels

1.1 Global scale

Proficient User

C2

Can understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. Can summarise information from different spoken and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. Can express him/herself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in more complex situations.


C1

Can understand a wide range of demanding, longer texts, and recognise implicit meaning. Can express him/herself fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. Can use language flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes. Can produce clear, well-structured, detailed text on complex subjects, showing controlled use of organisational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices.

Independent User

B2

Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics, including technical discussions in his/her field of specialisation. Can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible without strain for either party. Can produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options.

B1

Can understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. Can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where the language is spoken. Can produce simple connected text on topics, which are familiar, or of personal interest. Can describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes & ambitions and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.

Basic User


A2

Can understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment). Can communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters. Can describe in simple terms aspects of his/her background, immediate environment and matters in areas of immediate need.

A1

Can understand and use familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases aimed at the satisfaction of needs of a concrete type. Can introduce him/herself and others and can ask and answer questions about personal details such as where he/she lives, people he/she knows and things he/she has. Can interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly and is prepared to help.

1.2 Self-assessment grid




Reception

Interaction

Production




Listening

Reading

Spoken Interaction


Written Interaction

Spoken Production


Written Production

C2

I have no difficulty in understanding any kind of spoken language, whether live or broadcast, even when delivered at fast native speed, provided I have some time to get familiar with the accent.

I can read with ease virtually all forms of the written language, including abstract, structurally or linguistically complex texts such as manuals, specialised articles and literary works.

I can take part effortlessly in any conversation or discussion and have a good familiarity with idiomatic expressions and colloquialisms. I can express myself fluently and convey finer shades of meaning precisely. If I do have a problem I can backtrack and restructure around the difficulty so smoothly that other people are hardly aware of it.

I can express myself with clarity and precision, relating to the addressee flexibly and effectively in an assured, personal, style.

I can present a clear, smoothly-flowing description or argument in a style appropriate to the context and with an effective logical structure which helps the recipient to notice and remember significant points.

I can write clear, smoothly flowing text in an appropriate style. I can write complex letters, reports or articles, which present a case with an effective logical structure, which helps the recipient to notice and remember significant points. I can write summaries and reviews of professional or literary works.


C1

I can understand extended speech even when it is not clearly structured and when relationships are only implied and not signalled explicitly. I can understand television programmes and films without too much effort.

I can understand long and complex factual and literary texts, appreciating distinctions of style. I can understand specialised articles and longer technical instructions, even when they do not relate to my field.

I can express myself fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. I can use language flexibly and effectively for social and professional purposes. I can formulate ideas and opinions with precision and relate my contribution skilfully to those of other speakers

I can present clear, detailed descriptions of complex subjects integrating sub-themes, developing particular points and rounding off with an appropriate conclusion

I can express myself in clear, well-structured text, expressing points of view at some length. I can write detailed expositions of complex subjects in an essay or a report, underlining what I consider to be the salient issues. I can write different kinds of texts in a style appropriate to the reader in mind.

B2

I can understand extended speech and lectures and follow even complex lines of argument provided the topic is reasonably familiar. I can understand most TV news and current affairs programmes. I can understand the majority of films in standard dialect.

I can read articles and reports concerned with contemporary problems in which the writers adopt particular stances or viewpoints. I can understand contemporary literary prose.


I can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible. I can take an active part in discussion in familiar contexts, accounting for and sustaining my views.

I can write letters highlighting the personal significance of events and experiences.

I can present clear, detailed descriptions on a wide range of subjects related to my field of interest. I can explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options.

I can write clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects related to my interests. I can write an essay or report, passing on information or giving reasons in support of or against a particular point of view.

B1

I can understand the main points of clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. I can understand the main point of many radio or TV programmes on current affairs or topics of personal or professional interest when the delivery is relatively slow and clear.

I can understand texts that consist mainly of high frequency everyday or job-related language. I can understand the description of events, feelings and wishes in personal letters

I can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where the language is spoken. I can enter unprepared into conversation on topics that are familiar, of personal interest or pertinent to everyday life (e.g. family, hobbies, work, travel and current events).

I can write personal letters describing experiences and impressions.

I can connect phrases in a simple way in order to describe experiences and events, my dreams, hopes & ambitions. I can briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans. I can narrate a story or relate the plot of a book or film and describe my reactions.


I can write straightforward connected text on topics, which are familiar, or of personal interest.

A2

I can understand phrases and the highest frequency vocabulary related to areas of most immediate personal relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment). I can catch the main point in short, clear, simple messages and announcements

I can read very short, simple texts. I can find specific, predictable information in simple everyday material such as advertisements, prospectuses, menus and timetables and I can understand short simple personal letters

I can communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar topics and activities. I can handle very short social exchanges, even though I can't usually understand enough to keep the conversation going myself.

I can write short, simple notes and messages relating to matters in areas of immediate need. I can write a very simple personal letter, for example thanking someone for something.

I can use a series of phrases and sentences to describe in simple terms my family and other people, living conditions, my educational background and my present or most recent job

I can write a series of simple phrases and sentences linked with simple connectors like „and", „but“ and „because“.

A1

I can recognise familiar words and very basic phrases concerning myself, my family and immediate concrete surroundings when people speak slowly and clearly.

I can understand familiar names, words and very simple sentences, for example on notices and posters or in catalogues.


I can interact in a simple way provided the other person is prepared to repeat or rephrase things at a slower rate of speech and help me formulate what I'm trying to say. I can ask and answer simple questions in areas of immediate need or on very familiar topics.

I can write a short, simple postcard, for examples sending holiday greetings. I can fill in forms with personal details, for example entering my name, nationality and address on a hotel registration form.

I can use simple phrases and sentences to describe where I live and people I know.

I can write simple isolated phrases and sentences.

1.3 Qualitative aspects of spoken language use




RANGE

ACCURACY

FLUENCY

INTERACTION

COHERENCE

C2

Shows great flexibility reformulating ideas in differing linguistic forms to convey finer shades of meaning precisely, to give emphasis, to differentiate and to eliminate ambiguity. Also has a good command of idiomatic expressions and colloquialisms.

Maintains consistent grammatical control of complex language, even while attention is otherwise engaged (e.g. in forward planning, in monitoring others' reactions).

Can express him/herself spontaneously at length with a natural colloquial flow, avoiding or backtracking around any difficulty so smoothly that the interlocutor is hardly aware of it.


Can interact with ease and skill, picking up and using non-verbal and intonational cues apparently effortlessly. Can interweave his/her contribution into the joint discourse with fully natural turntaking, referencing, allusion making etc.

Can create coherent and cohesive discourse making full and appropriate use of a variety of organisational patterns and a wide range of connectors and other cohesive devices.

C1

Has a good command of a broad range of language allowing him/her to select a formulation to express him/ herself clearly in an appropriate style on a wide range of general, academic, professional or leisure topics without having to restrict what he/she wants to say.

Consistently maintains a high degree of grammatical accuracy; errors are rare, difficult to spot and generally corrected when they do occur.

Can express him/herself fluently and spontaneously, almost effortlessly. Only a conceptually difficult subject can hinder a natural, smooth flow of language.

Can select a suitable phrase from a readily available range of discourse functions to preface his remarks in order to get or to keep the floor and to relate his/her own contributions skilfully to those of other speakers.

Can produce clear, smoothly flowing, well-structured speech, showing controlled use of organisational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices.

B2

Has a sufficient range of language to be able to give clear descriptions, express viewpoints on most general topics, without much con­spicuous searching for words, using some complex sentence forms to do so.


Shows a relatively high degree of grammatical control. Does not make errors which cause misunderstanding, and can correct most of his/her mistakes.

Can produce stretches of language with a fairly even tempo; although he/she can be hesitant as he or she searches for patterns and expressions, there are few noticeably long pauses.

Can initiate discourse, take his/her turn when appropriate and end conversation when he / she needs to, though he /she may not always do this elegantly. Can help the discussion along on familiar ground confirming comprehen­sion, inviting others in, etc.

Can use a limited number of cohesive devices to link his/her utterances into clear, coherent discourse, though there may be some "jumpiness" in a long con­tribution.

B1

Has enough language to get by, with sufficient vocabulary to express him/herself with some hesitation and circum-locutions on topics such as family, hobbies and interests, work, travel, and current events.

Uses reasonably accurately a repertoire of frequently used "routines" and patterns asso­ciated with more predictable situations.

Can keep going comprehensibly, even though pausing for grammatical and lexical planning and repair is very evident, especially in longer stretches of free production.

Can initiate, maintain and close simple face-to-face conversa­tion on topics that are familiar or of personal interest. Can repeat back part of what someone has said to confirm mutual understanding.

Can link a series of shorter, discrete simple elements into a connected, linear sequence of points.

A2


Uses basic sentence patterns with memorised phrases, groups of a few words and formulae in order to commu­nicate limited information in simple everyday situations.

Uses some simple structures correctly, but still systematically makes basic mistakes.

Can make him/herself understood in very short utterances, even though pauses, false starts and reformulation are very evident.

Can answer questions and respond to simple statements. Can indicate when he/she is following but is rarely able to understand enough to keep conversation going of his/her own accord.

Can link groups of words with simple connectors like "and, "but" and "because".

A1

Has a very basic repertoire of words and simple phrases related to personal details and particular concrete situations.

Shows only limited control of a few simple grammatical structures and sentence patterns in a memorised repertoire.

Can manage very short, isolated, mainly pre-packaged utterances, with much pausing to search for expressions, to articulate less familiar words, and to repair communication.

Can ask and answer questions about personal details. Can interact in a simple way but communication is totally dependent on repetition, rephrasing and repair.

Can link words or groups of words with very basic linear connectors like "and" or "then".



2 Illustrative scales

2.1 Communicative Activities:


Reception Spoken


OVERALL LISTENING COMPREHENSION




C2

Has no difficulty in understanding any kind of spoken language, whether live or broadcast, delivered at fast native speed

C1

Can understand enough to follow extended speech on abstract and complex topics beyond his/her own field, though he/she may need to confirm occasional details, especially if the accent is unfamiliar.

Can recognise a wide range of idiomatic expressions and colloquialisms, appreciating register shifts.

Can follow extended speech even when it is not clearly structured and when relationships are only implied and not signalled explicitly.

B2

Can understand standard spoken language, live or broadcast, on both familiar and unfamiliar topics normally encountered in personal, social, academic or vocational life. Only extreme background noise, inadequate discourse structure and/or idiomatic usage influence the ability to understand.

Can understand the main ideas of propositionally and linguistically complex speech on both concrete and abstract topics delivered in a standard dialect, including technical discussions in his/her field of specialisation.


Can follow extended speech and complex lines of argument provided the topic is reasonably familiar, and the direction of the talk is sign-posted by explicit markers.


B1

Can understand straightforward factual information about common everyday or job related topics, identifying both general messages and specific details, provided speech is clearly articulated in a generally familiar accent.

Can understand the main points of clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure etc., including short narratives.

A2

Can understand enough to be able to meet needs of a concrete type provided speech is clearly and slowly articulated.

Can understand phrases and expressions related to areas of most immediate priority (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment) provided speech is clearly and slowly articulated.

A1

Can follow speech that is very slow and carefully articulated, with long pauses for him/her to assimilate meaning.


UNDERSTANDING INTERACTION BETWEEN NATIVE SPEAKERS

C2

No descriptor available


C1

Can easily follow complex interactions between third parties in group discussion and debate, even on abstract, complex unfamiliar topics

B2

Can keep up with an animated conversation between native speakers.

Can with some effort catch much of what is said around him/her, but may find it difficult to participate effectively in discussion with several native speakers who do not modify their language in any way.

B1

Can generally follow the main points of extended discussion around him/her, provided speech is clearly articulated in standard dialect.

A2

Can generally identify the topic of discussion around her that is conducted slowly and clearly.

A1

No descriptor available




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