Communications studies courses



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DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH

FALL 2016 COURSE OFFERINGS

COMMUNICATIONS STUDIES COURSES:


CMST 2000 Critical Approaches to Popular Culture considers critical issues and approaches in the study of popular culture. It will explore the ways in which everyone is both a user of and is used by popular culture. A variety of critical approaches to studying popular culture will be examined: Production, Texts, Audience, and History.


CMST 2001 Introduction to Communication Theory provides an introduction to theoretical approaches to organization, use and manipulation of language, including semiotics, performativity, mass and group communications, sociolinguistics and interpersonal communication. We will examine notions of influence, rhetoric, social judgment, deception, subject formation, globalization and cultural hybridity within the field of communications.

PR: CMST 2000


CMST 4000 Advanced Communications Theory engages communication theories, such as interpersonal, organizational, intercultural, or international communication, seeking to understand how and why mediated communication works have found their explanatory power to be useful. The course will aim to analyze various communication theories, apply communication theories to everyday life, write a theoretical literature review, and form sound hypotheses or focused research questions to advance theory.

PR: CMST 2000 and 2001 and 9 additional credit hours chosen from Program and Regulations, Elective Courses, List A or B


CMST 4001 Seminar in Mass Communication and Visual Culture examines the ways visual culture shapes and is shaped by communication forms and processes.
ENGLISH COURSES:
1000-level Courses
English 1080 - Critical Reading and Writing in English is an introduction to such literary forms as poetry, short fiction, drama, and the essay. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analyzing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, quoting and documenting, revising and editing. All sections of this course follow CRW guidelines available at www.mun.ca/arts/crw.

CR: ENGL 1000 Except for the purposes of fulfilling a CRW requirement, students may not receive credit for more than 6 credit hours in first-year courses in English (this includes unspecified first-year transfer credits).

English 1101 - Critical Reading and Writing II in Fiction is a study of such forms as the novel, the novella, and the short story sequence. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analyzing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing. All sections of this course follow CRW guidelines available at www.mun.ca/arts/crw and build on foundational CRW content delivered in ENGL 1080.

CR: Except for the purposes of fulfilling a CRW requirement, students may not receive credit for more than 6 credit hours in first-year courses in English (this includes unspecified first-year transfer credits).

PR: ENGL 1000 or 1020 or 1030 or 1080

UL: Bachelor of Arts students should normally choose their 2nd CRW course from a discipline listed in the Breadth of Knowledge Requirement, unless they pursue a Major or Minor in English.

English 1110 - Critical Reading and Writing in Rhetoric is an examination of prose texts such as essays, articles and reviews. Students write for different purposes and audiences. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analyzing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing. All sections of this course follow CRW guidelines available at www.mun.ca/arts/crw and build on foundational CRW content delivered in ENGL 1080.

CR: ENGL 1020, ENGL 1030. Except for the purposes of fulfilling a CRW requirement, students may not receive credit for more than 6 credit hours in first-year courses in English (this includes unspecified first-year transfer credits).

PR: ENGL 1000 or 1080

UL: Bachelor of Arts students should normally choose their 2nd CRW course from a discipline listed in the Breadth of Knowledge Requirement, unless they pursue a Major or Minor in English.





2000 Level Courses

English 2000 - Major Writers to 1800 is an introduction to the work of major authors by detailed study of selected texts. There is an emphasis on the various skills of essay writing.



English 2001 - Major Writers from 1800 is an introduction to the work of major authors by detailed study of selected texts. There is an emphasis on the various skills of essay writing.

English 2003 - Poetry is a study of poetry which aims to increase the student=s critical understanding and appreciation of poetry, conducted through an examination of a wide variety of kinds and techniques.


English 2004 - Short Fiction is a study of short fiction which aims to give the student an appreciation of the short story as a literary form. The course will deal with the nature, history and development of short fiction by considering a variety of authors and stories.

English 2151 – New Canadian Fiction is a study of fiction of Canadian writers since the 1970s.


English 2213 - Twentieth Century American Novel is a study of representative American novels of the twentieth century, including such authors as James, Dreiser, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Hurston, Morrison, Pynchon, DeLillo and Silko.

English 2600 - Introduction to Middle English is a study of the language and literature of the later medieval period, excluding Chaucer.
English 2813 - Reading Images introduces students to the field of visual culture and familiarizes them with both the vocabulary and the methodologies to examine images critically.
English 2850 - What is Film is designed to introduce students to the medium of film. It is aimed at marking a shift from the natural enjoyment of movies to a critical understanding and to modes of film practice. Focus will be on the elements of film as components of cinematic style and meaning and on various approaches to the study of film.
3000 Level Courses

English 3002 - Medieval Books is an examination of the development and role of the manuscript book during the Middle Ages. Topics covered will include book production and dissemination; authors, scribes and audiences; and various kinds of books (e.g. glossed Bibles, anthologies, books of hours, etc.) and their uses.

CR: History 3000, Medieval Studies 3000, Religious Studies 3000


English 3152 - Canadian Literature to 1918 is a study of the development of Canadian Literature from its beginnings to the end of World War I.
English 3155 - Newfoundland Literature is a study of Newfoundland literature with emphasis on representative writers since 1900.

CR: ENGL 2155

PR: successful completion of two second-year English courses
English 3201 - Shakespeare is a study of six comedies and histories such as Love’s Labour’s Lost, The Taming of the Shrew, A Mid-Summer Night’s Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado About Nothing, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, 1 Henry IV, 2 Henry IV, Henry V.


English 3260 - American Drama
is a study of works by dramatists from a range of periods.

CR: ENGL 4308

PR: successful completion of two second-year English courses


English 3350 - Theatre offers an introduction to principles of directing and acting through lectures, discussion and stage production.

English 3351 - The Physical Stage and Video Technique is an introduction to the fundamentals and vocabulary of design, lighting and stagecraft and film/video craft, including sound, properties etc.

English 3500 - Old English Language and Poetry introduces students to basic elements of Old English grammar and vocabulary through the practice of translating one or more poems of Old English into modern English and the study of Old English poetic corpus in modern translations.


English 3713 - Contemporary British Drama (Harlow) is a study of contemporary productions. The course will be conducted as a seminar. It involves attendance at performance of contemporary British theatrical productions, and includes aspects of stagecraft.
English 3816 - Television (Harlow) is an introduction to the principles of acting for the camera through lecture, discussion and studio work.

PR: ENGL 3350 and 3351; admission priority will be given to students in Diploma in Performance and Communications Media.


English 3817 - Writing and Gender II draws on a variety of writing to examine questions related to the study of gender. Possible topics may include the changing constructions of gender and the intersections of gender with race, class, nationality and sexuality.

PR: successful completion of two second-year English courses


English 3843 – Introduction to Comics will familiarize students with the study of comics. This course will examine a large selection of comics and current theoretical debates surrounding the relation between word and image, in general, and the workings of graphic narrative, in particular.

CR: ENGL 2244

English 3900 – Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction is conducted as a seminar using models of contemporary writing and the students' own work. Each student will be required to submit work regularly.

CR: credit may be obtained for only two of ENGL 3900, 3901, and 3905

PR: Normally, admission to this course will be based on the instructor's evaluation of the student's writing. Class size will be limited.


English 3901 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry is conducted as a seminar using the models of contemporary writing and the students’ own work. Each student will be required to submit work regularly.
Note: 1. Students can receive credit for only two of ENGL 3900, 3901, and 3905.
2. Normally, admission to this course will be based on the instructor’s evaluation of the student’s writing and portfolio submission. Class size will be limited.


4000 Level Courses
English 4030 - Seventeenth-Century English Literature focuses on the prose and poetry of representative authors of the period and provides a critical overview of the literary, historical, social, political, and religious context.

PR: successful completion of two third-year English courses



English 4041 - Later Eighteenth-Century British Literature is a study of selected works by such authors as Boswell, Burney, Johnson, Smollett, and Sterne.

English 4080 - British Postmodern Literature & Beyond is a study of representative texts from World War II to the present in their social, historical, and cultural contexts.

PR: successful completion of two third-year English courses




English 4100 - Critical Theory II
is a survey of critical approaches to literature in the twentieth century.

English 4270 - American Literature Since 1945 is a study of representative writers of the period, such as Stevens, Lowell, Wilbur, Plath, McCullers, Bellow, Malamud.

Note: Students can receive credit for only ENGL 3215, 4260, 4261, and 4270

English 4300 - Modern Drama I examines drama from Ibsen to the present day, principally of the realistic tradition, studied through representative plays.

CR: ENGL 3275

PR: ENGL 2002 or permission of the Head of Department
English 4401 - Producing the Play is a full semester working with a selected play, to culminate in public performance. Students will be required to participate fully in all aspects of the production, except direction, which will be the responsibility of the instructor.

English 4819 – Imagining Islands. Islands have long proved a rich and malleable imaginative terrain for creative writers.This course will examine recurring themes in literary figurations of island space.

English 4822 - Canadian Literature: Making it New is a study of some of the main concepts in Canadian culture since World War II as they affect the history and development of Canadian Literature.

PR: completion of 3 credit hours chosen from courses at the 2000 or 3000 level in Canadian Literature, or permission of the instructor


English 4851 - Canadian Exploration Literature will examine Canada’s early exploration and travel literature and show how it has shaped our contemporary fiction. Early texts may be studied from an anthology of exploration writings, such as Germaine Warkentin's Canadian Exploration Literature: An Anthology. Several contemporary novels will also be studied and may include Wayne Johnston's The Navigator of New York and John Steffler's The Afterlife of George Cartwright.

PR: successful completion of two third-year English courses


English 4900 - Book History and Print Culture I is an introduction to bibliographical and textual studies for the advanced study of English. Areas covered may include the book as a material object; the history of the book; manuscripts; the spread of printing; the hand-press period; editing of texts; the evolution of the library; origins of intellectual property; freedom of the press; aspects of literary detection, forgery and plagiarism.
Prerequisites/Co-requisites: six credit hours at the 3000-level.


English 4999 - Essay for Honours Candidates. This course is not available on the electronic registration system. Registration for this course requires the signature of the essay advisor and the Manager of the Academic Programs or the Head.

English 5000 - Instructional Field Placement is a 6 credit hour course which occurs upon completion of course work. The curriculum emphasis is on the application of acquired skills. Continuing the project-oriented structure built into the practical courses, students will be placed with existing projects in the professional communities of film, television, theatre or video.

Prerequisites: English 3350, 3351, 3816, 4400, 4401 and 4402, with an overall average of at least 65% in these courses.

Note: Restricted to students in Diploma in Performance and Communications Media. Admission is by application to the Program Coordinator, normally at least three months before the beginning of the placement, and is limited to students who at the time of admission have completed the six courses listed above with an overall average of at least 65% and who already hold a first degree or are in their final year of a degree program as confirmed by the Office of the Registrar. Credit for this course can be used only towards the Diploma in Performance and Communications Media.

1ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE COURSES:

English 102F - Foundation English is a non-credit course designed for students whose language is other than English and whose knowledge and use of English do not meet the standards for entry into regular first-year English courses.

English 1020 - Writing for Second Language Students I is an introduction to the use of English with emphasis on composition for non-native English speaking students.



English 1021 - Writing for Second Language students II develops skills in critical reading and writing of academic English, with emphasis on research and writing syntheses from sources, for non-native English-speaking students.


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