Contents 2 Introduction 3 Unit B589: Perspectives on World Religions (Hinduism) 6 Unit B589: Perspectives on World Religions (Hinduism) 11 Unit B589: Perspectives on World Religions (Hinduism) 18 Unit B589

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Contents



Contents 2

Introduction 3

Unit B589: Perspectives on World Religions (Hinduism) 6

Unit B589: Perspectives on World Religions (Hinduism) 11

Unit B589: Perspectives on World Religions (Hinduism) 18

Unit B589: Perspectives on World Religions (Hinduism) 21

Introduction

Background

Following a review of 14 – 19 education and the Secondary Curriculum Review, the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) has revised the subject criteria for GCSEs, for first teaching in September 2009. This applies to all awarding bodies.

The new GCSEs have more up-to-date content and encourage the development of personal, learning and thinking skills in your students.

We’ve taken this opportunity to redevelop all our GCSEs, to ensure they meet your requirements. These changes will give you greater control of assessment activities and make the assessment process more manageable for you and your students. Controlled assessment will be introduced for most subjects.

From September 2012 assessment tasks may be undertaken at any point between release of the task and the examination series for which the task must be submitted. Centres must ensure that candidates undertake a task that is valid for submission in the year in which the candidate intends to submit it.

OCR has produced a summary brochure, which summarises the changes to Religious Studies. This can be found at www.ocr.org.uk, along with the new specification.

In order to help you plan effectively for the implementation of the new specification we have produced these Schemes of Work and Sample Lesson Plans for Religious Studies. These Support Materials are designed for guidance only and play a secondary role to the Specification.

Our Ethos

OCR involves teachers in the development of new support materials to capture current teaching practices tailored to our new specifications. These support materials are designed to inspire teachers and facilitate different ideas and teaching practices.

Each Scheme of Work and set of sample Lesson Plans is provided in Word format – so that you can use it as a foundation to build upon and amend the content to suit your teaching style and students’ needs.

The Scheme of Work and sample Lesson plans provide examples of how to teach this unit and the teaching hours are suggestions only. Some or all of it may be applicable to your teaching.

The Specification is the document on which assessment is based and specifies what content and skills need to be covered in delivering the course. At all times, therefore, this Support Material booklet should be read in conjunction with the Specification. If clarification on a particular point is sought then that clarification should be found in the Specification itself.

A Guided Tour through the Scheme of Work


= Innovative Teaching Idea

This icon is used to highlight exceptionally innovative ideas.



= ICT Opportunity

This icon is used to illustrate when an activity could be taught using ICT facilities.






Unit B589: Perspectives on World Religions (Hinduism)

Suggested teaching time

10

Topic

Responsibility for the planet

Topic outline

Suggested teaching and homework activities

Suggested resources

Points to note

Hindu teachings about the origins of the world and humanity
  • In Hinduism there is a core belief that the origins of the world are mysterious (in combination with the other beliefs and ideas explored below); introduce the topic by considering what the students consider to be mysterious by creating a questionnaire that poses a variety of statement about ‘ultimate’ questions or issues (eg: ‘There is such a thing as ghosts’ or ‘The world was not created by God’) to which the students have to respond with the degree of certainty they have about that issue (think of a scale from ‘Proved – probable – possible - unlikely – impossible – disproved – I believe); they can compare their views to those of others in the group and discuss what it means to describe something as ‘mysterious’


  • Look at the Nasadiya Sukta and relate this to the preceding discussion; students could use this and the Purusha Shukta to contribute to both sides of a debate on whether the origins of the universe (or indeed anything at all) are beyond human explanation.

  • Discovery

    Jon Mayled and Libby Ahluwalia

    Nelson Thornes



  • One World, Many Issues

    Bernard Williams, Susan Amanda Kennick and Graham Langtree



    Nelson Thornes



  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/



  • Resources suggested here will give an overview of relevant beliefs and teachings, which can be used and adapted for the resources described in the ‘Suggested Activities’ section

The cyclical universe

  • Select a range of images that represent different stages of cyclical theories of creation; mix these up into a pack for students. Read the students an account of cyclical ideas of creation, as they listen they should sort the pictures into an order that fits with the ‘story’ they are being read. After you have finished they should write a caption for each picture. They can compare the summary of the cyclical universe theory that results with other students in the group, or you could create a True/False quiz that students can use their summary to answer.





Religious and scientific understanding of the origins of the world
  • Give groups of students three different accounts of origins of the world (e.g. Hindu, Christian and Humanist). Students should create a diagram to show features unique to each account, features shared by all accounts and features shared by any 2 of the accounts. Depending on the accounts they are given students should be able to explore similarities and differences in some depth. This table can then be used to draft a response to the statement ‘Religious and Scientific accounts of the creation of the world are in direct opposition to one another’






The Purusha Shukta and creation stories

  • Give students a copy of the text of the Purusha Sukta (this may need to be simplified, or commentary added) and read it as a group; discuss what it has to say about creation. Students should then draw an outline of purusha and label the different parts of the body with the things that they are said to have been changed into/given birth to – e.g. his head created the Brahmin caste, his arms the kshatriya etc





People and animals

  • 1) Create a set of cards with characteristics of humans/and or animals on each one (eg: has a soul; is a ‘higher’ form of life; can be eaten etc). Students work in pairs or small groups to sort these cards into ‘Human’ , ‘Animal’, ‘Both’ or ‘Neither’ from their personal perspective. They should use this to write a short summary response to the statement ‘People are different to animals’

    2) Give out some key Hindu teachings in this area, such as Ahimsa, the cycle of samsara, karma, dharma and atman (ideally they should already be familiar with at least some of these, but more details can be given if necessary). The task can then be repeated but from a Hindu perspective, using the supplied teachings to categorise the cards









Responses to environmental issues
  • Give students a blank map of the world/picture of the globe; they should then research and find images to represent different environmental problems around the world and build a collage of these on their map using pictures of, for example, deforestation in Brazil, melting glaciers in the arctic, radioactive waste, endangered animals etc.

    To this collage students can then add information about different responses to each issue; target this by giving them ‘flags’ with the name and logo of a relevant group on them, the students should make a note on the back of this flag about which issue this group is concerned with and what they are doing about it and stick the flag onto the relevant issue on their map.

    Finally students need to consider Hindu responses to environmental issues; give them a short article summarising Hindu views, and 3 stickers with ‘aum’ on, these represent the 3 most important issues for Hindus. Students should work in pairs to decide which issue they think is likely to be the most, second and third most important for Hindus and should use the stickers to mark these. They should make notes of their reasons, using the information you have given them and then present their choices to the rest of the class.




  • This could be differentiated further by giving different information to different groups of students, so that each presentation covers a different aspect of Hindu teaching







Unit B589: Perspectives on World Religions (Hinduism)

Suggested teaching time

10

Topic

War, peace and human rights

Topic outline

Suggested teaching and homework activities

Suggested resources

Points to note

Attitudes to war and violence

Ahimsa and pacifism



  • Create an ‘ahimsa’ target, with 4 concentric rings and a definition of ‘Ahimsa’ in the middle. Each student in the group should summarise their own attitude to war on an arrow of paper. Take these arrows in and mix them up, give them back out so each student has another students arrow. They should then take it in turns to ‘fire’ the arrow at the target, sticking it as close or as far from Ahimsa as they think the attitude expressed goes. Give an opportunity for another student to challenge their placement

  • Use the target after all the arrows have been stuck as a plan for writing a response to the statement ‘Ahimsa is an impossible goal in the modern world’


  • This task could also be adapted for ‘absolute pacifism’, which could be at the centre of the target, the next ring out would be conditional pacifism, the third would be ‘Just War’ and the outermost would be ‘warmonger’. Students could either write their own arrows as above,, or you could provide them with arrows ready written with a range of views, including Hindu views and teachings, and some from other religions, so that students can then use the target to identify whether Hindus are pacifists or not

  • Discovery

    Jon Mayled and Libby Ahluwalia

    Nelson Thornes



  • One World, Many Issues

    Bernard Williams, Susan Amanda Kennick and Graham Langtree

    Nelson Thornes



  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/



  • Resources suggested here will give an overview of relevant beliefs and teachings, which can be used and adapted for the resources described in the ‘Suggested Activities’ section

M K Gandhi

  • Gandhi was never awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, although many people today feel he should have been. Give students an account of his life and work and ask them to write an article for a newspaper arguing for him to be posthumously given the award
  • Students could create an iconic picture of Gandhi, symbolising the work he did and the ideas he expressed about peace and violence. This could form part of a set of pictures, as similar pieces could be done representing Gandhi’s work and teaching in other areas, such as equality






Varna

  • Give out the names of the varnas with a brief definition of each (e.g. Brahmin = priests, includes teachers and other professions; Kshatriya = soldier, includes government of others; Vaishya = business people, includes finance; Sudra = Servant,, includes customer service and Dalit/Harijan/’Untouchable’ = outside the system, jobs no one else wants ). Students should use these as the centred of 5 spidergrams and sort jobs/social roles from a list into these 5 categories

  • Recap with students the meaning of ‘dharma’ in general terms; students should draft a ‘dharma contract’ outlining the duties for each varna. Using this contract they can then discuss which varna would be allowed to engage in war and what the duties of the other varnas would be in wartime

  • These contracts can be extended as other teachings are explored with, for example, clauses about what constitutes a justifiable war, or the implications of ahimsa





The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

(UDoHR)


  • Students could make their own list of the ten most important rights that every person should have; they then compare these lists to those of others in the class and discuss the differences. Finally they compare them to the rights given in the declaration, consider which of these they did not include in their own lists and why they might not have thought of them or considered them important
  • Students could be given case studies of things happening around the world – e.g. people working in sweat shops, child soldiers, activists imprisoned without charge, people forced to marry someone they did not choose, someone sentenced to death or people whose religion is banned by law – they could use the UDoHR to identify which rights these people are being denied


  • This activity could be extended into a discussion about which rights are most important or which situation is the least/most justifiable





Hindu attitudes to Human Rights

  • 1) Give each student a sheet with one of a range of key concepts on it –they should be concepts relating to how people are treated such as karma, ahimsa, the laws of manu and varnashramadharma. In the centre of the sheet is a brief definition of the concept, around it the sheet should be split into two halves labelled ‘In conflict’ or ‘In agreement’. Give the students a selection of rights, maybe taken from the UDoHR, for example the right to life, to education, to freedom of speech, freedom of religious worship etc. Students should sort these cards into those rights that would come into conflict with the religious teaching they have, and those rights that would be supported by the teaching (eg: a right to choose a career would conflict with varna while the right to life is supported by ahimsa). Depending on the range of rights given there may need to be an ‘Irrelevant’ or ‘No Connection’ option as well

    2) students should then get into groups so that all of the different religious teachings are represented within a group; they can compare their ‘rights’ sheets and come up with a group summary of how Hindus would react to a variety of given Human Rights situations








Unit B589: Perspectives on World Religions (Hinduism)


Suggested teaching time

10

Topic

Prejudice and equality

Topic outline

Suggested teaching and homework activities

Suggested resources

Points to note

Varnashramadharma, caste and discrimination

  • Students could create an iconic picture of Gandhi, symbolising the work he did with the ‘Untouchables’ and the ideas he expressed about the caste system. This could form part of a set of pictures, as similar pieces could be done representing Gandhi’s work and teaching in other areas, such as pacifism



  • Discovery

    Jon Mayled and Libby Ahluwalia

    Nelson Thornes



  • One World, Many Issues

    Bernard Williams, Susan Amanda Kennick and Graham Langtree

    Nelson Thornes



  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/



  • Resources suggested here will give an overview of relevant beliefs and teachings, which can be used and adapted for the resources described in the ‘Suggested Activities’ section

Racism
  • Give students a collection of facts about life in India and traditional Hindu society. Include things like the wide variety of racial types in India, traditional preferences for lighter skin as being more attractive and facts about the caste system. Students should sort these onto a ‘racism scale’ where one side represents teachings, views, ideas or customs that could be seen as negatively prejudiced and the other side represents inclusive, or not prejudiced teachings, views, ideas or customs


  • Students could use this scale to write an exam style response to the statement ‘All human beings are equal’





Gender and the role of women

  • Ask students to identify, from a range of activities, which they would traditionally associate with women and which they would associate with men. Compare their lists with an account of traditional Hindu society. Use this information to create a ‘dharma contract’ between an unborn baby and Brahman; some students should write a contract for a boy and others for a girl (able students could explore the idea of the Third gender here) so that they can compare them

  • Read the story of Rama and Sita and identify the qualities of the ideal wife displayed by Sita; students could recreate the story in a modern context, presenting Sita as the 21st century ideal wife, to compare traditional values in a relationship with modern ones





Unit B589: Perspectives on World Religions (Hinduism)

An Introduction to Human Rights

OCR recognises that the teaching of this qualification above will vary greatly from school to school and from teacher to teacher. With that in mind this lesson plan is offered as a possible approach but will be subject to modifications by the individual teacher.

Lesson length is assumed to be one hour.

Learning Objectives for the Lesson

Objective 1

To introduce the idea that human beings have rights


Objective 2

To consider the ways in which these rights can be denied or taken away

Objective 3

To understand the content and intention of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Objective 4

To begin to consider the relative importance of rights

Recap of Previous Experience and Prior Knowledge


  • This lesson could come at any stage in the ‘War, peace and Human Rights’ topic; it is intended as an introduction to the concept of human rights and could be used as an introduction to the whole topic. No prior knowledge is assumed.

    Content


Time

Content

5 minutes

Working individually students brainstorm the rights they believe they have as British citizens

5 minutes

Students compare their list with a partner and select the most important right they think the law gives them.

5-10 minutes

Give out a list of the rights listed under the Universal Declaration of Human Rights; this should be read through and briefly discussed – are there any rights that the students do not think matter very much? Is there anything missing that they would expect to see? Which rights do they consider the most important?


15 minutes

In small groups (3 or 4) students examine a number of brief ‘case studies’ of human rights abuses around the world. There should be a range of issues, including ones where it could be argued what is happening is justifiable in some way for example the death penalty could be justified with the argument that the person chose to commit their crime and forfeit their right to life; or child labour could be justified by saying that if a family is in extreme poverty money is more important than education. Students should work as a group to identify which right or rights the people in each case are being denied.

10 minutes

Students should ‘rank’ their case studies, from the most serious to the least serious breach of human rights. Each group needs a spokesperson to explain the reasons for their placement.

Consolidation

Time

Content

15 minutes

Each group chooses one of the cases and explains how high they ranked it and why; the spokesperson who makes the explanation then chooses another group to respond to their placement. The response should say whether the second group agreed or disagreed with the placement of that case, and why.

The second group then chooses a case of their own and the task is repeated until each group has explained at least one of their placements.






© OCR 2009




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