Course: American Sign Language Interpreter – Year 1 Total Framework Hours up to



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Northshore School District

Course: American Sign Language Interpreter – Year 1

Total Framework Hours up to: 180

CIP Code: 161603

Exploratory Preparatory?

Date Last Modified: 8/1/2012

Career Cluster: Education and Training

Cluster Pathway: Sign Language Interpreting




COMMUNICATION

COMPONENTS AND ASSESSMENTS

Performance Assessments:

Note: Numbers listed before Performance Assessment items refer to the Competencies listed below.


Expressive and Receptive End of Course Assessment: 1.1.1; 1.2.1; 1.2.2; 1.3.1: Students are encouraged to take the SLPI:ASL or the ASLPI to demonstrate ASL proficiency skills. The goal for ASL 1 is to earn a rating of Novice to Survival on the SLPI:ASL, or Level 1 on the ASLPI.

Expressive:

1.1.1; 1.3.1; 1.3.2: Students will sign a personal autobiography including their own language backgrounds, likes and dislikes, living situations (who with, where, what type of housing), and school/work information.

1.1.1; 1.3.1; 1.3.2: Students will bring photographs and/or props of their family to share with the class. Students will present their photos and/or props and give information including names, ages, relationships, locations, events, and other important details. Students will also respond to questions asked by their peers about their photos.
1.3.3: Students will study videos of Deaf storytelling and copy the way the story is signed in their own project. (Stories may include: “Timber”, “The Gum Story”, “The Gallaudet and Clerc Story.”)
1.3.1; 1.3.2; 1.3.3: Students will sign a narrative about their daily routine including times and activities (ex: 7:00am wake up, brush teeth, eat breakfast; 7:45am ride the bus to school . . . ).
1.3.3: Students will sign a childhood story from their own lives (including surrogates (formerly role shifting), eye gaze, referencing, ASL grammar principles, character introductions and descriptions, transitions, numbers, and fingerspelling).
Receptive:

1.2.1; 1.2.2, Students will take tests and quizzes to assess vocabulary, fingerspelling, and comprehension at the ASL 1 level. Tests and quizzes are signed by the ASL teacher or other proficient signers.


1.2.1; 1.2.2: Students will watch videos in ASL and retell or answer comprehension questions.

Leadership Alignment:

After studying ASL Storytelling, students will create their own story in ASL using correct grammatical and cultural components. Students will work in small groups to develop and prepare their stories as well as give feedback (peer evaluation) and support so that each student is able to produce their best work. Final stories are performed for the class and members from the Deaf community. 1.A.1; 1.A.2; 1.A.3; 3.A.1; 3.A.2; 3.A.3; 3.A.5; 3.B.1; 7.B.1; 7.B.2; 7.B.3; 9.A.1; 9.A.2; 10.A.2; 10.B.1.a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h


Standards and Competencies

Standard/Unit: Communication - National ASL Standards (draft)

    1. Students engage in conversations and correspondence in American Sign Language to provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions.

    2. Students understand and interpret recorded and live American Sign Language on a variety of topics.

    3. Students present information, concepts, and ideas in American Sign Language to an audience of viewers on a variety of topics.

Competencies

Total Learning Hours for Unit: 70

    1. Interpersonal skills

1.1.1 Students exchange simple information in the target language, utilizing cultural references where appropriate. Students will:

A. Produce and recognize appropriate attention-getting behaviors (e.g., hand wave, shoulder tap).

B. Use appropriate eye gaze and turn-taking behaviors.

C. Express basic greetings, introduction of basic personal information, address a new acquaintance, and make introductions and farewells

(e.g., name, age, educational background)

D. Give and follow basic commands and requests (e.g., following commands incorporating spatial information; asking for permission or an

item).

E. Ask for and provide basic and personal factual information (e.g., names, schools, background information).


F. Inquire about and express simple preferences and opinions (e.g., favorite people, food, colors).

G. Identify, express, and respond with short answers to questions related to basic emotions and feelings (e.g., happiness, sadness, surprise).

H. Ask for clarification (e.g., what, again, NOT-understand).

I. Demonstrate comprehension of basic questions on a variety of familiar topics (e.g., wh- and yes/no questions).

J. Give simple descriptions (e.g., depicting verbs, adjectives).

K. Follow and give simple directions and make observations about the immediate environment (e.g., use of space, distance, signer’s

perspective, real world orientation).

L. Discuss a variety of topics including family, home, school, daily routines, pets, and recreation (e.g., buoy (formerly ranking / listing &

ordering technique), constructed action, constructed dialogues, depicting verb, surrogate (formerly role-shifting), token; negate

sentences: NOT, NONE, NOT-YET)

M. Demonstrate ability to use and recognize appropriate listener feedback during one-to-one conversation (e.g., head nod (affirm), head shake

(negate).


1.2 Interpretive Skills

1.2.1 Students demonstrate an understanding of ASL presented in person and through a variety of media on familiar topics such as self, family,

school, etc. Students will:

A. Demonstrate fingerspelled word recognition by correctly reading proper names fingerspelled in one-to-one scenarios with teacher-aided

cues (e.g., brands, names, places, words that have no signs).

B. Identify main ideas and some details, while viewing an ASL signed narrative (e.g., retell the main points of a short fairy tale, using buoy

(formerly ranking / listing & ordering technique), constructed action, constructed dialogues, depicting verb, surrogate (formerly role-

shifting), token.

C. Demonstrate comprehension of basic ASL syntax by repeating the sentence (e.g. O-S-V, topic-comment, topicalization).

D. Comprehend the relationship between handshape and meaning in selections of ASL literature, including ABC, handshape, and number

stories (e.g., identify and list key handshapes and their meanings). DVD, “A to Z ABC Stories in ASL” may be used as a resource.

E. Comprehend simple culturally authentic ASL genres (e.g., ABC and number stories and poetry).

F. Understand simple instructions, such as classroom procedures.

G. Demonstrate comprehension of rehearsed material and material on familiar topics, recorded as well as live performance (e.g., retell content

of brief messages).

1.2.2 Students will comprehend signed and non-manual markers to understand simple messages in the target language. Students will:

A. Differentiate among statements, questions, and commands (e.g., yes/no, WH, rhetorical questions, commands).

B. Recognize basic non-manual markers (e.g., facial grammar, mouth phonemes/morphemes).



    1. Presentational Skills

1.3.1 Students present information that contains a variety of vocabulary, phrases, and patterns. Students will:

A. Produce correct sign parameters (handshapes, movements, locations, palm orientations, and non-manuals) including dominant/non-

dominant hand, appropriate signing space and fluency

B. Produce numbers 0 -100 (rocking numbers, cardinal and ordinal numbers, Rule of 9, ages and durations, subtraction problems, ranking).

C. Produce fingerspelling (know appropriate words to fingerspell, correct hand position, fluency, letter formation/configuration, double letters,

how to recover from errors, and tools for successful reading of fingerspelling such as looking for the first and last letter and seeing the

fingerspelled word as a whole instead of individual letters).

1.3.2 Students will use appropriate grammar including use of contrastive structure, spatial agreement and time indicators / ASL timeline.

1.3.3 Students express simple narratives/stories with appropriate prosody on familiar topics (e.g. daily routines, events, work duties, school, hobbies,

family, friends, pets).




Aligned Washington State Standards

Art




Communications

1.1.1 Applies a variety of listening strategies to accommodate the listening situation

2.1.1 Analyzes the needs of the audience, situation, and setting to adjust language and other communication strategies.

2.2.1 Uses communication skills that demonstrate respect.

2.2.2 Applies skills and strategies to contribute responsibly in a group setting.

2.3.2 Creates personal intercultural communication norms to guide one’s self in a diverse social system.

3.1.1 Applies skills to plan and organize effective oral communication and presentation.

4.1.1 Analyzes and evaluates strengths and weaknesses of one’s own communication using own or established criteria.

4.2.1 Applies strategies for setting grade level appropriate goals and evaluates improvement in communication.



Educational Technology

1.1.1 Generate ideas and create original works for personal and group expression using a variety of digital tools.

2.3.1 Select and use common applications.




Health and Fitness

1.1 Develop motor skills

Math




Reading




Science




Social Studies

3.1 Develops ideas and organizes writing.

World Language

    1. Students engage in conversations, provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions.




Writing




CULTURE

COMPONENTS AND ASSESSMENTS

Performance Assessments:

Note: Numbers listed before Performance Assessment items refer to the Competencies listed below.

2.2.1: Students will study Deaf artists and create their own piece, either a replication of a piece by a Deaf artist, or an original piece done in the same style as a Deaf artist. Students submit their piece along with a written explanation of how their work relates to the artist they chose. (Students could also display their work for “Deaf Awareness Week” – see Leadership Alignment under Connections).
2.1.2; 2.1.4; 2.2.2; 2.2.3; 2.2.4: After watching videos, reading sections of literature, researching, and attending to teacher lectures about Deaf history and culture, students will take written exams to show their growing understanding of Deaf culture and history. (Films may include: “Signs of the Times,” “Through Deaf Eyes,” “The Hammer,” ASL Films)


Leadership Alignment:

Students will attend Deaf community events to observe and/or interact with Deaf signers when possible and complete a written reflection about their experience and what they learned about Deaf culture. Students are expected to practice respectful and culturally appropriate behavior. 3.A.1; 3.A.2; 3.A.3; 3.A.5; 7.B.1; 7.B.2; 7.B.3; 8.C.1; 8.C.2; 8.C.3; 8.C.4; 9.A.1; 9.A.2; 11.B.1

Resource: “A Sign of Respect: Strategies for Effective Deaf/Hearing Interactions,” DVD and Workbook by Thomas K. Holcomb and Anna Mindes.


Standards and Competencies

Standard/Unit: Culture - National ASL Standards (draft)

2.1 Students demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the practices and perspectives of American Deaf Culture

2.2 Students demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the products and perspectives of American Deaf Culture


Competencies

Total Learning Hours for Unit: 35

2.1 Students develop an awareness of perspectives and practices of the cultures where the target language is used. Students will:

2.1.1 Explore commonly held viewpoints of the culture (e.g., cultural vs. medical views of deafness, D/d deaf, residential vs. inclusive models of

education).

2.1.2 Describe customs and traditions of the culture, such as greetings, celebrations, and courtesies (e.g., name signs, homecoming,

Deaf/hearing/hard of hearing, Deaf only organizations).

2.1.3 Use appropriate Deaf cultural behaviors in a Deaf environment (signaling, interrupting, walking through signed conversations, respond to touch

to move, leave-taking, relaying information/facilitating communication, turn taking, opening and closing conversations, requesting clarification,

indicating understanding (“oh-I-see”), eye contact, changing topics).

2.1.4 Identify communication strategies used with non-signers such as creative

gesturing, written English, interpreters, and technology.

2.2 Students develop an awareness of products of the cultures where ASL is used. Students will:

2.2.1 Acknowledge themes, ideas, or perspectives of Deaf culture and recognize how they are reflected by the culture (e.g., DeVIA art; theater and

plays; poetry and storytelling).

2.2.2 Identify the locations of local Deaf schools in Washington state and postsecondary programs for Deaf students across the country.

2.2.3 Demonstrate knowledge of tangible products of Deaf culture (e.g., sign language/Deaf literature, media, and games.

2.2.4 Explore common tools and technology used in daily activities of Deaf people (e.g., visual alerts, sufficient lighting for visual communication,

use of technology for communication, video phones, video relay, video chat).


Aligned Washington State Standards

Art

2.1: Applies a creative process in the arts (dance, music, theatre and visual arts.)

2.2: Applies a performance process in the arts (dance, music, theatre and visual arts.)

4.4: Understands how the arts influence and reflect cultures/civilization, place and time.


Communications

1.2.1 Evaluates the effectiveness of and creates a personal response to visual and auditory information.

2.1.1 Analyzes the needs of the audience, situation, and setting, to adjust language and other communication strategies.

2.2.1 Understands how to show respect for other’s input. Responds to the clarification needs of others. Provides feedback in

role-play scenarios to the speaker/signer.



Educational Technology

1.1.1 Generate ideas and create original works for personal and group expression using a variety of visual tools.

1.2.2 Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of many cultures.

2.1.2 Practice ethical and respectful behavior.


Health and Fitness




Math




Reading




Science




Social Studies




World Language

3.2 Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the world language

and its cultures.



Writing





CONNECTIONS

COMPONENTS AND ASSESSMENTS

Performance Assessments:

Note: Numbers listed before Performance Assessment items refer to the Competencies listed below.


3.1.1: Students will quiz each other on math facts to practice expressive and receptive signing of numbers.
3.1.1; 3.1.2: Students will choose one well-known historical or current member of the Deaf community, research their life, and present a PowerPoint to the class. (“Movers and Shakers,” by Cathryn Carroll and Susan M. Mather, and “Deaf Heritage,” by Jack Gannon, may be used as a resource.)

3.1.2: Students will read a novel or non-fiction book written by or about Deaf people, Deaf history, or American Sign Language and respond through writing and discussion to the topics about Deaf culture and the experiences of the characters in the novel. (Possible novels: “Deaf Again,” or “Anything But Silent” by Mark Droslbaugh, “For Hearing People Only,” by Moore and Levitan, “Everyone Here Spoke Sign Language,“ by Nora Ellen Groce, “A Loss for Words,” by Lou Ann Walker, “Laurent Clerc, The Story of His Early Years,” by Cathryn Carroll.)

3.2.1; 3.2.2: Students will take written exams after watching videos, reading sections of literature, researching, and attending to teacher lectures about Deaf history and culture.


Leadership Alignment:

Students will create an informative poster or art piece to show or post publicly as part of an all-school Deaf Awareness exhibit. (See connection to Performance Assessment under Culture.) 1.A.1; 1.A.2; 1.A.3; 1.B.2; 3.A.3; 3.B.2; 3.B.3; 7.B.1; 9.A.2; 10.A.1; 10.A.2; 10.B.1; 11.B.1



Standards and Competencies

Standard/Unit: Connections

3.1 Students reinforce and further their knowledge of other disciplines through American Sign Language

3.2 Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through American Sign Language and Deaf culture.


Competencies

Total Learning Hours for Unit: 20

    1. Students use information acquired in the study of ASL and information acquired in other subject areas to reinforce one another. Students will:

3.1.1 Apply previously learned skills from other subjects, when appropriate, to demonstrate knowledge in the target language (e.g., practice math

fact drills; English/ASL grammar; famous Deaf people; receptive fingerspelling).

3.1.2 Relate content from other subject areas to topics discussed in the language class (e.g., literature by or for Deaf people; appearance of Deaf

characters in TV drama; sports; Deaf people who have contributed to historical events; signs for and from other countries).



    1. Students will identify information unique to American Sign Language and Deaf culture. Students will:

3.2.1 Demonstrate knowledge of the evolution and spread of American Sign Language (e.g., travels of Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet; Martha’s

Vineyard Gallaudet University, NTID, CSUN; Deaf clubs, regional signs).

3.2.2 Demonstrate understanding of the core cultural values of Deaf people (e.g., Deaf pride, Deafness as a positive trait).


Aligned Washington State Standards

Art

2.1 Applies a creative process to the arts.

Communications

1.2.1 Communicate to collaborate and learn with others.

Educational Technology

1.3.2 Locate and organize information from a variety of sources and media.

2.3.1 Select and use common applications.



Health and Fitness




Math




Reading

2.1 Demonstrate evidence of reading comprehension.

3.4 Read for literary experience in a variety of genres.

Science





Social Studies




World Language

    1. Students engage in conversations, provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions.

5.1 Students use the language both within and beyond the school setting.

5.2 Students show evidence of becoming life-long learners by using the language for personal enjoyment and enrichment.



Writing





COMPARISONS

COMPONENTS AND ASSESSMENTS

Performance Assessments:

Note: Numbers listed before Performance Assessment items refer to the Competencies listed below.

4.1.1; 4.1.2; 4.1.3; 4.2.1; 4.2.2: Students create a Venn diagram to show similarities and differences between Deaf culture and their own and/or ASL and their primary language.
4.2.1; 4.2.2: Students participate in a Voice-Off-Day where they do not speak for an entire day, before, during, and after school (ear plugs optional). Students write reflectively before and after VOD about their expectations and experiences and share with the class.

4.1.1; 4.1.2; 4.1.3: Students will translate signed ASL to written English on tests and assignments.


Leadership Alignment:

Voice-Off-Day (VOD): Students will spend a 24-hour period without talking. (ear plugs optional). Before the VOD, students write about their expectations, fears, and assumptions about how the day will go and what obstacles they will encounter. After the VOD, students write their reflection paper about their experience and participate in a classroom discussion about how they adapted to the challenge.

7.A.1; 7.A.2


Standards and Competencies

Standard/Unit: Comparisons - National ASL Standards (draft)

4.1 Students demonstrate understanding of the nature of American Sign Language and their own languages

4.2 Students demonstrate understanding of the nature of American Deaf culture and their own.


Competencies

Total Learning Hours for Unit: 25

4.1 Students compare basic elements of ASL and English. Students will:

4.1.1 Compare the differences of basic parameters in ASL and English (word/sign, auditory/manual, not interchangeable, need to be able to

distinguish between meanings and concepts of ideas, improve conceptually accurate signing).

4.1.2 Compare the similarities and differences of inflections in ASL and the student’s native language and the role of non-manual signals in ASL

(e.g., asking questions using non-manual grammars).

4.1.3 Compare and contrast ASL and English grammar including tense and time, numbers, questions, structure, verb conjugation and inflection,

mental mapping, referents, linguistic variation, buoys, constructed action / dialogue, depicting verbs, surrogates, tokens, and prounouns

(personal, possessive and plural).

4.2 Students demonstrate an understanding of the significance of culture through comparisons between the culture studied and the students’ own

culture. Students will:

4.2.1 Compare patterns of behavior and interaction in the students’ own culture with those of Deaf culture

A. Technology used by Deaf people (visual signalers, captioning, videophones)

B. Interpersonal behaviors (hugging, comfort with proximity; eye contact);

C. Misconceptions by hearing people about Deaf people;

D. When and why Deaf people use interpreters;

E. Communication traits (bluntness; sharing of information)

F. Collectivist cultural values (providing more information in response to questions; providing introductions; discovery of shared experiences;

long goodbyes)

4.2.2 Demonstrate an awareness of elements of the students’ own culture (e.g., communication and social interaction; other languages in the

home, extended family, formalities, slang)



Aligned Washington State Standards

Art



Communications

2.1.1 Analyzes the needs of the audience, situation, and setting, to adjust language and other communication strategies.

Educational Technology




Health and Fitness



Math

M1.5.C Make inferences and draw conclusions based on data.


Reading



Science




Social Studies



World Language

1.3 Students present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience of listeners or readers on a variety of topics.

2.1 Students demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the practices and perspectives of the culture studied

and their own.

2.2 Students demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the products and perspectives of the culture studied

and their own.

4.1 Students demonstrate understanding of the nature of language through comparisons of the language studied and their

own.

4.2 Students demonstrate understanding of the concept of culture through comparisons of the cultures studied and their own.



Writing




.

COMMUNITIES

COMPONENTS AND ASSESSMENTS

Performance Assessments:

Note: Numbers listed before Performance Assessment items refer to the Competencies listed below.


5.2.1; 5.2.2: Students will watch “Through Deaf Eyes,” and complete a report, test, or project demonstrating their understanding and awareness of Deaf history, Deaf education, oppression and discrimination/Audism, Deaf organizations, Gallaudet University, or other related topics
5.1.2; 5.2.1; 5.2.2: Students will choose an organization or event to research and create a PowerPoint presentation to share with the class
5.1.1: Students create a project (PowerPoint, poster, research paper, skit) to show how ASL can be beneficial for recreational, educational, or occupational purpose
5.1.2: Students will report on current events in the Deaf community throughout the year (local, regional, national, international)

Leadership Alignment:

Students will attend Deaf community events and interact with and/or observe Deaf signers when possible and complete a written reflection about their experience and what they learned about Deaf cultural behaviors. 3.A.1; 3.A.2; 3.A.3; 3.A.5; 7.B.1; 7.B.2; 7.B.3; 8.C.1; 8.C.2; 8.C.3; 8.C.4; 9.A.1; 9.A.2; 11.B.1

Students will organize and host an ASL event at school (potential events include: game night, pizza night, ASL movie, performance, panel guests). 1.A.1; 1.A.2; 1.A.3; 1.B.2; 3.A.3; 3.B.2; 3.B.3; 7.B.1; 9.A.2; 10.A.1; 10.A.2; 10.B.1; 11.B.1


Standards and Competencies

Standard/Unit: Communities - National ASL Standards (draft)

5.1 Students use American Sign Language within and beyond the school setting

5.2 Students show evidence of becoming lifelong learners by using American Sign Language for personal enjoyment and enrichment


Competencies

Total Learning Hours for Unit: 30

5.1 Students identify situations and resources in which ASL skills and cultural knowledge may be applied beyond the classroom setting for recreational,

educational, and occupational purposes. Students will:

5.1.1 Identify examples of ASL and Deaf culture in media, entertainment, and technology (vlogs, movies, videos, entertainment, careers requiring

sign language skill).

5.1.2 Identify resources, such as individuals and organizations accessible through the community or the Internet, that provide basic cultural

information about the culture studied. (e.g., National Association of the Deaf, American Sign Language Teachers Association, Registry of

Interpreters for the Deaf, National Black Deaf Advocates, ASL web browser, Deaf Nation, Deaflympics).
5.2 Students demonstrate an awareness of current events in the target culture. Students will:

5.2.1 Give information about and understand the impact of current and historical events, politics, and education in Deaf culture (e.g., Deaf

President Now, oral vs. manual, No Child Left Behind, FCC-Video Phone, Americans with Disabilities Act, Miss Deaf America Ambassador).


Aligned Washington State Standards

Art


Communications





Educational Technology




Health and Fitness




Math




Reading




Science




Social Studies

5.1 Students use the language both within and beyond the school setting.

5.2 Students show evidence of becoming life-long learners by using the language for personal enjoyment and enrichment.



Writing

1.1.1 Analyzes and selects effective strategies for generating ideas and planning writing.

1.3.1 Revises text, including changing words, sentences, paragraphs, and ideas.

1.5.1 Publishes in formats that are appropriate for specific audiences and purposes.

3.1.1 Analyzes ideas, selects a manageable topic, and elaborates using specific, relevant details and/or examples.




21st Century Skills


Check those that students will demonstrate in this course:

LEARNING & INNOVATION

Creativity and Innovation

Think Creatively

Work Creatively with Others

Implement Innovations

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving

Reason Effectively

Use Systems Thinking

Make Judgments and Decisions

Solve Problems

Communication and Collaboration

Communicate Clearly

Collaborate with Others

INFORMATION, MEDIA & TECHNOLOGY SKILLS

Information Literacy

Access and /evaluate Information

Use and Manage Information

Media Literacy

Analyze Media

Create Media Products

Information, Communications and Technology
(ICT Literacy)


Apply Technology Effectively


LIFE & CAREER SKILLS

Flexibility and Adaptability

Adapt to Change

Be Flexible

Initiative and Self-Direction

Manage Goals and Time

Work Independently

Be Self-Directed Learners

Social and Cross-Cultural

Interact Effectively with Others

Work Effectively in Diverse Teams

Productivity and Accountability

Manage Projects

Produce Results

Leadership and Responsibility

Guide and Lead Others

Be Responsible to Others







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