Credit: 3 units rgep cluster: Social Sciences and Philosophy (ssp) Offered By

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HISTORY 1

(PHILIPPINE HISTORY)

Course Description:

The political, social, and cultural development of the Philippines


Credit: 3 units
RGEP Cluster: Social Sciences and Philosophy (SSP)
Offered By: Division of Social Sciences/College of Arts and Sciences

U. P. in the Visayas, Miagao, Iloilo


Course Objectives:

  1. To acquire a wider perspective of the history of the Filipinos and to appreciate our rich cultural heritage.

  2. To develop historical consciousness and a strong sense of nationhood; and

  3. To develop a critical mind and the ability to communicate effectively through the practice of historical method.


Required references

Agoncillo, Teodoro. History of the Filipino People. Quezon City: Garcia Publishing Co.,1990.

Constantino, Renato. The Philippines: A Past Revisited. Quezon City: Tala Publishing Corp.,1975.

________________. The Philippines: The Continuing Past. Quezon City. 1978.


Course Outline

I. Clio’s Inspiration: Herstory/History (1.5 hours)


A. What’s in it for us? Its uses and sources

B. Making Sense Out of History: Approaches to the study of Philippine History


Unit Objectives:

The students will be able to:



  1. describe the uses of history;

  2. identify the sources of history;

  3. differentiate the various approaches to the study of Philippine history;

  4. discuss the importance of interpreting Philippine history from Filipino point of view; and

  5. justify the necessity of studying history in understanding one’s national identity.

Readings:

De la Costa, Horacio, S.J. “Three Lectures on History” in Historical Bulletin. September 1960. pp 15-38.

Larkin, John A. (ed.). Perspective on Philippine Historiography: A Symposium. New Haven: Yale University, Southeast Asia Studies. Pp. 1 – 17.

McCoy, Alfred W. “Introduction: The Social History of an Archipelago” in Alfred W. McCoy and Ed C. de Jesus, (eds), Philippine Social History: Global Trade and Local Transformation. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press, 1981. pp 1-8.


II. Where on earth are we? The Setting (3 hours)


A. Dynamics of the Earth: Geological and Geographical Foundations of the Philippines

B. Of Gods, Giants and Grand Plots: Tales from the Past

Unit Objectives

The students will be able to:

1. locate the strategic position of the Philippines in relation to other countries in the region and the world;


  1. explain the different theories regarding the geological and geographical foundations of the Philippines; and

  2. point out the importance of geographic features of the Philippines on the development of Philippine history and culture.


Readings:

Jocano, Landa F. Philippine Prehistory. Quezon City: Philippine Center for Advance Studies, 1975. pp. 1 – 6.

_____________. Questions and Challenges in Philippine Prehistory. Professorial Chair Lecture Series Monograph No. 7. Quezon City: University of the Philippine Press, 1975. pp 1-35.

Scott, William H. Prehispanic Source Materials for the Study of Philippine History. Quezon City: New Day Publisher, 1984. p. 12 – 32.

_____________. Barangay: Sixteenth Century Philippine Culture and Society. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press, 1994.

III. As It Was: The Archipelago Before the White Men Came (6 hours)

A. From Adam and Eve to the Tabon Man: Theories Concerning the Peopling of the Philippines

B. Boats and Barter: Philippine Trade Patterns/Culture Bearers/Transmitters

C. Barangay: The Way We Were

D. The Kris and the Crescent: Islam in the Philippines

Unit Objectives:

The students will be able to:


  1. compare and contrast the historical and cultural implications of the various theories of peopling of the Philippines;

  2. discuss the Philippine trade patterns and their role in the diffusion of culture in to the Philippines prior to the coming of the Spaniards;

  3. trace the entry and spread of Islam in to the Philippines; and

  4. synthesize and interpret Asian legacies on Philippine cultures prior to the Spanish period.


Readings:

Jocano, Landa F. The Philippines at the Spanish Contact. Manila: MCS Enterprise, Inc, 1975. pp 1 – 43.

Hutterer, Karl. “Pre-Historic Trade and Evolution in Philippine Societies: A Reconsideration” in Karl Hutterer’s Economic Exchange and Social Interaction in Southeast Asia. Ann Arbor, 1977.
IV. In Search of Spices, Souls and Sovereign Rule: Philippine Colonial Society (1570-1763) (7.5 hours)

A. Go East: Rationale of Spanish Colonization Overseas

B. The Sword and the Cross: Instruments of Pacification and Exploitation

C. The Spanish Bond: Institutions of Colonial Rule

D. Agraviados y Padrinos: Patterns of Filipino Response

Unit Objectives:

The students will be able to:


  1. explain the diverse factors that led to Spanish colonization overseas;

  2. identify and explain the various instruments of “Pacification” and exploitation used by the Spaniards in the Philippines;

  3. identify, describe and evaluate the social structures of colonial Philippines;

  4. explain the patterns of Filipino response to Spanish colonial rule; and

  5. evaluate the impact of Spanish colonialism on Philippine society and culture.

Readings:

Cushner, Nicholas P. Spain in the Philippines: From Conquest to Revolution. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University, 1973. pp 101 – 152.

De la Costa, Horacio. Readings in Philippine History: Selected Historical Texts Presented with a Commentary. Quezon City: Bookmark, 1965. pp. 44-64; 65-97.

Phelan, John Leddy. The Hispanization of the Philippines: Spanish Aims and Filipino Responses 1565-1700. University of Wisconsin Madison, 1959. pp. 72-89, 93-135, 137-151.


V. Progress and Protests: Formation of a Filipino National Society (1763-1896) (6 hours)

A. Loosening Up: Impact of European Developments on Philippine Society

B. Of Steamboats and Sugar Mills: Global Trade and Modernization

C. Reform, Radicalism, and Revolution: The Propaganda Movement, Signs of a Brewing Revolution


Unit Objectives:

The students will be able to:



  1. appraise the impact of European political, economic, and intellectual developments on Philippine society;

  2. reconstruct the patterns of economic development in the Philippines as they were influenced by new forms of global trade and communications;

  3. identify and explain the causes and significance of the reform movements in the Philippines; and

  4. explain the factors leading to the Philippine Revolution.

Readings:

Cushner, Nicholas P. Spain in the Philippines: From Conquest to Revolution. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press, 1973. pp. 187 - 227.

De la Costa, Horacio. Readings in Philippine History: Selected Historical Texts Presented with a Commentary. Quezon City: Bookmark, 1965. pp. 128-196.

Fast, Jonathan and Richardson, Kim. Roots of Dependency: Political and Economic Revolution in the 19th Century Philippines. Quezon City: Center for Nationalist Studies, 1979. pp 13 – 41.

McCoy, Alfred W. “The Queen Dies Slowly: The Rise and Decline of Iloilo City” in Alfred W. McCoy and Ed C. de Jesus, (eds), Philippine Social History: Global Trade and Local Transformation. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press, 1981. pp 297-358.

Warren, James. “Slavery and the Impact of External Trade: The Sultanate in the 19th Century” in McCoy and de Jesus, op. cit. pp. 415 – 444.

VI. The Revolution and the Republic: The Transitional Society from the Revolution to the Filipino-American War (1896-1907) (4.5 hours)

A. Nipped in the Bud: The Malolos Republic

B. Bloody, Blundering Business: American Imperialism in the Philippines

C. The Burgis and the Masa: Divergent Interests

Unit Objectives:

1. to trace the developments leading to the establishment of the Malolos Republic after the outbreak of the revolution;



  1. to recognize the form of American involvement in the Philippine Revolution;

  2. to compare and contrast the divergent interest of the elite and the masses and their impact on Philippine society; and

  3. to form generalizations on the impact of the Philippine Revolution on Philippine society.

Readings:

Agoncillo, Teodoro A. The Revolt of the Masses: The Story of Bonifacio and the Katipunan. Quezon City: University of the Philippines Press, 1956. pp 276 – 298.

__________________. Malolos: The Crisis of the Republic. Quezon City: University of the Philippines Press, 1960. pp. 621 – 678.

Fast, Jonathan and Richardson, Kim. Roots of Dependency: Political and Economic Revolution in the 19th Century Philippines. Quezon City: Center for Nationalist Studies, 1979. pp. 55 – 84.

Guerrero, Milagros C. “ The Provincial and Municipal Elites of Luzon During the Revolution: 1898 – 1902” in McCoy and de Jesus. Pp. 155 –190.

Ileto, Reynaldo C. Pasyon and Revolution: Popular Movements in the Philippines, 1898 – 1910. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University, 1979.

May, Glenn Anthony. Inventing a Hero: A Posthumous Recreation of Andres Bonifacio. Quezon City: New Day, 1997.

VII. A Tale of Two Races: White-Man’s Manifest Destiny and Little Brown Brother’s Bondage (1898-1945) (6 hours)

A. Dreams and Visions: America Goes Global

B. The Eagle Has Landed: Civilizing with Krags and Chocolates

C. Shades of Free Trade: Economic Prosperity and Dependency

D. The Commonwealth: What It Was Like To Have Uncle Sam Looking Over Our Shoulders
Unit Objectives:

The students will be able to:



  1. identify and explain the reasons for American expansionism;

  2. explain the nature of the relationship between Filipino and American leadership;

  3. distinguish the different forms of Filipino resistance to American colonialism; and

  4. formulate valid interpretation of the nature and results of American colonialism.

Readings:

Abaya, Hernando. Betrayal in the Philippines. Quezon City, 1965.

De la Costa, Horacio. Readings in Philippine History: Selected Historical Texts Presented with a Commentary. Quezon City: Bookmark, 1965. pp. 250 – 271.

Friend, Theodore. Between Two Empires. Quezon City, 1969.

Hicks, George. The Comfort Women: Sex Slaves of the Japanese Imperial Forces. Singapore: Heiremann Asia, 1995.

Ileto, Reynaldo C. Pasyon and Revolution: Popular Movements in the Philippines, 1898 – 1910. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University, 1979. pp. 209-212.

Jenkins, Shirley. American Economic Policy Towards the Philippines. Stanford, 1954. pp. 30 – 31.

Leroy, James. The Americans in the Philippines. Boston: Houghton Miffins Co., 1914.


Reappraising an Empire: New Perspective in Philippine-American History. Edited by Peter Stanley. Cambrdige, Massachusetts, 1983.

Salamanca, Bonifacio S. The Filipino Reaction to American Rule. Quezon City, 1984. pp. 44 – 64.

Sturtevant, David. Popular Uprising in the Philippines: 1898 – 1910. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press, 1979. pp. 256-266.

Thomson, James Jr. C. et al. Sentimental Imperialist. New York, New York, 1981. Chapters 8 and 19.


VIII. Tatlong Taong Walang Dios. The Japanese Invasion and Occupation (1942 – 1945) (4.5 hours)

A. The Rising Sun: Japanese Expansionism in Asia

B. Staying Alive: Collaboration, resistance and atbp.


  1. “I Shall Return”: The “Liberation” and Reoccupation.

Unit Objectives:

The students will be able to:

1. assess the significance and impact of the Japanese occupation on Philippine society;

2. describe and analyze the nature of Philippine “Liberation,” and

3. explain the nature of the “collaboration” issue.


Readings:

Lichauco, Alejandro et al. Imperialism in the Philippines. New York, 1973. pp 129 – 134.

Pomeroy, Stephen. The United States and the Philippines: A Study of Neocolonialism.

Taylor, George E. The Philippines and the United States: Problems of Partnership. New York, 1964.


IX. Dependent Independence: From Post-war Republic to People Power (1946 – present) (6 hours)

A. “It Takes Two to Tango”: Philippine- American Neo-colonial Relations

B. “Games of State: Structure of National Leadership from Roxas to Marcos

C. “Clear and Present Danger”: Martial Law and the Years of Living Dangerously

D. The Continuing Storm: Resistance from the HUKBALAHAP to the NPA and Muslim Secessionist Movement

E. Ousting the Dictator: People Power Revolution

Unit Objectives:

The students will be able to:


  1. discuss the changing features of the Filipino- American neocolonial relations from Roxas to Marcos;

  2. describe the structure of national leadership from Roxas to Marcos ;

  3. identify the bases for the declaration of Martial Law;

  4. reconstruct the events leading to the “bloodless revolution”;

  5. evaluate the causes, growth and effects of the HUKBALAHAP, NPA and Muslim secessionist movements.


Readings:

Bello, Waden et al. “Colonial Without Occupation Force” in Development Debacle. The World Bank in the Philippines. San Francisco, California, 1982. pp 13-23; 29 – 39.

Brillantes, Alex and Amarles-Ilago, Bienvenida. 1898 – 1992: The Philippine Presidency. Quezon City: University of the Philippines College of Business and Administration, 1994.

Constantino, Leticia, R. The Snap Revolution: A Post Mortem. Quezon City: 1986. pp. 1 – 27.


X. Do You Know Where You Are Going To: Globalization and Prospects for the Future (3 hours)

A. World Trade Organization (WTO) and Regional Trade Blocs

B. Issues on Body Politics: SARS and the Outbreak and Re-emergence of Diseases, Women’s Reproductive Health

C. The Politics of Information and Communication Technologies: Control and Access in the Third World

Unit Objectives:

The students will be able to:



  1. re-evaluate the strategic position of the Philippines in relation to other countries in the region and the world;

  2. discuss the contemporary trade patterns and its historical and cultural implications on

Philippine society;
  1. assess the state of Philippine society and its attendant problems;


  2. formulate possible long-term solutions to these problems.


Readings:

Eviota, Elizabeth Uy. The Political Economy of Gender: Women and Sexual Division of Labor in the Philippines. London: Zed, 1992.

Nabudere, Dan. The Political Economy of Imperialism. London: Zed Press Ltd., 1977. pp.212 – 281.

Shalom, Stephen Rosskamn. The United States and the Philippines: A Study of Neocolonialism. Quezon City: New Day Publisher, 1986.

Tanada, Loenzo. Nationalism: A Summon to Greatness

UP School for Economics. An Analysis of the Philippine Economic Crisis: A Workshop Report. Quezon City, 1986. pp 1 – 27.

Villegas, Edberto M. Studies in Philippine Political Economy.
Note: extra 4 sessions are reserved for field trips and film showings
Course Requirements/Grading Scheme

2 Major Long Exams 1st long exam 15%

2nd long exam 15%

Final exam 30%



Project/report 10% Class recitation 15% Homework and Quizzes 15% 100%


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