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Document of

The World Bank

Report No: 46825-ID

PROJECT APPRAISAL DOCUMENT
ON A
PROPOSED GRANT
IN THE AMOUNT OF US $50 MILLION
TO THE
Republic Of Indonesia
FOR The
VN-Hanoi Urban Transport Project PROJECT
December 5, 2008

CURRENCY EQUIVALENTS



(Exchange Rate EffectiVE DECEMBER 1, 2008)

Currency Unit

=

Indonesian Rupiah (IDR or Rp.)

IDR 1,000

=

US$ 0.102

US$ 1

=

IDR 12,837


FISCAL YEAR

January 1



December 31


ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS

ADB


Asian Development Bank




AMDAL

Analisa Mengenai Dampak Lingkungan or Environmental Impact Assessment




BAPPEDA

Badan Perencanaan Pembangunan Daerah (of Government of Aceh)




BAPPENAS

State Ministry for Development and Planning (of GOI)




BPKP

Financial and Development Supervisory Board (Badan Pengawasan Keuangan dan Pembangunan




BRR

Bureau for Rehabilitation and Reconstruction for Aceh and Nias




CAS

Country Assistance Strategy




CQ

Selection Based on Consultants’ Qualifications




DIPA

Daftar Isian Pelaksanaan Anggaran or Government of Indonesia annual budget allocation document




EA

Environmental Assessment



EDFF

Economic Development Financing Facility (The Project)




EIA

Environment Impact Assessment




EMP

ESMF


EST

Environmental Management Plan

Environmental and Social Management Framework

External Support Team





FM

Financial Management




FMS

Financial Management Specialist




GoA

Government of Aceh




GOI

Government of Indonesia




IBRD

International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (The World Bank)




ICB

International Competitive Bidding




IC

Individual Consultants




IDA

International Development Association





IFR

Interim Financial Report




KPA

Kuasa Pengguna Anggaran or Authorized Budget Holder




KPDT

Ministry for Disadvantaged Areas (of GOI)




KPI

Key Performance Indicator




LGIP

Local Government Annual Investment Plan




MBD

MDF


Model Bidding Documents

Multi-Donor Trust Fund for Aceh and North Sumatra






MOF

Ministry of Finance




MoU

MTR


Memorandum of Understanding

Mid Term Review






NCB

National Competitive Bidding




NGO

Non-Governmental Organization





O&M

Operations and Maintenance




PGIP

Provincial Government Annual Investment Plan




OM

Operations Manual




PA

Pengguna Anggaran or Budget Holder




PMU

Project Management Unit




QBS

Quality-Based Selection




QCBS

Quality and Cost Based Selection




RFP

Request For Proposal




RKL/RPL

Rencana Pengelolaan Lingkungan/Rencana Pemantauan Lingkungan or Environmental Management Plan /Environmental Monitoring Plan




RPJMD

Medium Term Development Plan of the Government of Aceh



SA

SBD


SIE

Special Account

Standard Bidding Documents



Sub-project Implementing Entity




SOE

Statement of Expenditures




SP2D

Surat Perintah Penyaluran Dana or Letter of Instruction for Disbursement (issued by KPPN)




SPP-LS

Surat Perintah Membayar Langsung or Letter of Instruction for Payment (issued by KPA)




SSS

Single-Source Selection




TA

Technical Assistance




TOR

Terms of Reference




UKL/UPL

Upaya Pengelolaan Lingkungan/Upaya Pemantauan Lingkungan or Environmental Management Efforts/Environmental Monitoring Efforts




UNDP

United Nations Development Program



















Vice President:




James W. Adams

Country Director:




Joachim von Amsberg

Sector Director/Sector Manager:




Vikram Nehru/Tunc Uyanik

Task Team Leader




Thomas A. Rose

Vietnam

VN-Hanoi Urban Transport Project project
table of Contents
Page

I. STRATEGIC CONTEXT AND RATIONALE 1

a. country and sector issues 1

b. rationale for mdf and bank involvement 3

c. higher level objectives to which the project contributes 4

II. Project Description 4

a. lending instrument 4

b. project development objective and key indicators 4

c. project components 5

d. lessons learned and reflected in the project design 6

e. alternative designs considered and reasons for rejection 8

III. Implementation 9

a. partnership arrangements 9

b. institutional and implementation arrangements 9

c. monitoring and evaluation of outcomes/results 11

d. transition strategy and sustainability 11

e. critical risks and possible controversial aspects 13

f. grant conditions and covenants 14

iv. Appraisal Summary 15

a. economic and financial analysis 15

b. technical 16

c. fiduciary 16

d. anti-corruption action plan 18

e. social 20

f. environment 20

g. safeguard policies 21

h. policy exceptions and project readiness 22



LIST OF ANNEXES


annex 1: country and sector background 24

ANNEX 2: major related projects financed by the world bank and/or other agencies 46

ANNEX 3: results framework and monitoring 47

ANNEX 4: detailed project description 55

ANNEX 5: PROJECT COSTS 64

ANNEX 6: critical risks, mitigation measures and rating 66

ANNEX 7: implementation arrangements 71

ANNEX 8: FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT 90

ANNEX 9: procurement arrangements 101

ANNEX 10: economic and financial analysis 117

ANNEX 11: safeguards policy issues 119

ANNEX 12: anti-corruption action plan 127

ANNEX 13: communications stRategy 134

ANNEX 14: project preparation and supervision 138

ANNEX 15: documents in the project file 143

ANNEX 16: statement of World Bank loans and credits 147

annex 17: country at a glance 150

annex 18 – Maps 153




LIST OF TABLES

Table 1: Economic Growth in Aceh 2003-07 (percent) 26

Table 2: Agricultural Production in Aceh (Rp. billion) 27

Table 3: GDP Composition Based on Expenditures (%)- 2003-2006 29

Table 4: Gross Capital Formation (as % of GDP) 29

Table 5: Aceh’s Work Force- 2003-2007 30

Table 6: Reconstruction Players in Livelihoods Sector in Aceh 46

Table 7: RESULTS MONITORING FRAMEWORK AND ARRANGMENTS 50

Table 8: Project Costs and Sources of Funding (US$ million) 64

Table 9: Estimated Allocation to Project Components (US$ million) 64

Table 10: Detailed Project Management (Component 2) Costs – born by EDFF, KPDT and Government of Aceh (in US$) 65

Table 11: Critical Risks and Proposed Mitigation Measures 66

Table 12: Risk Assessment and Summary of Mitigating Measures 91

Table 13: Allocations of Grant Proceeds 98

Table 14: Financial Management Action Plan and Conditionalities 100

Table 15: General Risks Assessment 104

Table 16: Environmental and Social Safeguard Policies 121

Table 17: Institutional Arrangement for ESMF Implementation 124



LIST of FIGURES


Figure 1: Aceh’s Unemployment Rate 2002-2007 24

Figure 2: Consumer Price Index of Aceh and Indonesia since the Tsunami 28

Figure 3: Aceh’s Minimum Provincial Wages in Comparison with National Levels 28

Figure 4: IFES Survey 2007: Specific Conditions in Aceh 31

Figure 5: Overview of the Methodology 39

Figure 6: EDFF Project General Structure 72

Figure 7: BAPPEDA Organization Structure and Procuring Units 106



INDONESIA

aceh- economic development financing facility

EAST ASIA AND PACIFIC REGION

EASPR - EASFP


Date: December 5, 2008

Country Director: Joachim von Amsberg

Sector Director/Sector Manager: Vikram Nehru /Tunc Uyanik

Project ID: P109024

Lending Instrument: Grant (MDF)



Team Leader: Thomas A. Rose

Sectors: Private Sector

Themes: Private Sector Development

Environmental Screening Category: B

Safeguard Screening Category: Limited Impact

Project Financing Data


[ ] Loan [ ] Credit [ X ] Grant [ ] Guarantee[ ] Other:

Total Project Costs: US$52.85 million

MDF Grant Amount: US$50 million

Government Contribution: US$2.85 million

Financing Plan (US$ million)

Source

Local

Foreign

Total

Borrower

2.85

0.0

2.85

MDF

5.0

45.0

50.0

Total

7.85

45.0


52.85

Grant Recipient: Ministry of Finance, Government of Indonesia

Responsible Agency: Ministry for the Development of Disadvantaged Areas (KPDT) and Government of Aceh

Address: Jl. Abdul Muis No. 7 Jakarta Pusat, 10160

Contact Person: For KPDT: Ir. Rachmat Tatang Bachrudin, Deputy Minister for Economic and Private Business Development

For Government of Aceh: Prof. Munirwansyah, Head of BAPPEDA (Regional Body of Planning and Development in Aceh Province))



Estimated disbursements (FY/US$ 50 million)

FY

FY09

FY10

FY11

FY12

FY13

Annual

5.0

16.0

16.0

11.0

2.0


Cumulative

5.0

21.0

37.0

48.0

50.0

Project implementation period: January 2009 End: June 2012

Expected closing date: Jun 30, 2012

Does the project depart from the CAS in content or other significant respects? [ ]Yes [ X ] No

Does the project require any exceptions from Bank policies? [ ] Yes [ X ] No

Have these been approved by Bank management? [ ] Yes [ X ] No

Is approval for any policy exception sought from the Board? [ ] Yes [ X ] No


Does the project include any critical risks rated “substantial” or “high”? [X ]Yes [ ] No

Does the project meet the Regional criteria for readiness for implementation? [ X]Yes [ ] No

Project development objective: To promote post-tsunami economic recovery and foster sustainable equitable long-term economic development in Aceh in line with the GoA’s own plans for economic development (RPJMD).

Project description: The project will support sub-project initiatives for the economic development of Aceh and provide assistance in project management and capacity building.


Which safeguard policies are triggered, if any? Environmental Assessment (OP. 4.01)

Significant, non-standard conditions, if any: None

INDONESIA

aceh- economic development financing facility project


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


  1. The devastation of the December 2004 Tsunami coupled with the preceding years of civil unrest contributed to high unemployment and poverty in Aceh. A large share of the Aceh population remains vulnerable with average consumption just above the poverty line, so that a small shock such as the end of the reconstruction effort could send some of them back into poverty. The Tsunami not only caused tremendous loss of life, but ended the prospects of long term employment for many people. Some 80,000 small and medium sized enterprises, providing employment to some 140,000 people were destroyed. The reconstruction has created new job opportunities in some sectors (construction, transport), but these jobs have been closely linked to the availability of reconstruction funds and are not likely to be sustainable in the long run.
  2. The Government of Indonesia (GOI) and the provincial Government of Aceh (GoA) have committed to building the community of Aceh back to being stronger and better than it was pre-Tsunami. Both have identified economic growth and development as essential elements of recovery from the Tsunami. The GoA, in its Medium Term Development Plan (RPJMD), has identified key factors hampering Aceh’s economic development as weak government institutions, damaged infrastructure and low investment levels. It has elaborated its strategic framework for economic development which identifies three lead economic sectors-- agriculture, trade and services, key because of their contribution to both regional production as well as employment. The GoI, through BAPPENAS has likewise produced a broad blue print for the future development of Aceh.


  3. The current reconstruction effort, estimated at approximately US$7.7 billion spread over a five years period (2005-2009), is one of the largest such efforts in a developing country. The generosity of donors and the reconstruction program have been lifting Aceh’s economy in the short run. The reconstruction effort has been creating a construction boom in some parts of the province. Aceh’s economy is dominated by oil and gas production, which accounts for 28 percent of regional GDP (2007) and over 90 percent of the province’s exports. However, the mining and related manufacturing sectors have been declining for several years and known gas reserves are projected to decline to near zero by 2014. This together with current growth trends, concentrated in sectors linked to the availability of large funds for reconstruction reinforces concerns regarding Aceh’s economy beyond 2009. Therefore, new efforts are needed to create conditions for sustainable long term economic recovery and development in Aceh’s economy in order to create jobs and reduce poverty.
  4. The proposed Economic Development Financing Facility project (EDFF), a MDF Grant consisting of two main components to be implemented during January 2009-June 2012 period, will support initiatives to promote sustainable economic growth and job creation in the whole of Aceh, in line with the GoA’s RPJMD and BAPPENAS’ blueprint. Component One (US$44.5 million) will support sub-projects that address critical issues affecting economic development in Aceh by contributing to economic recovery post-tsunami and building a more competitive and supportive business environment necessary to create broad based private sector job opportunities and growth, targeting the poor and other vulnerable groups. Component Two (US$5.5 million) will fund project management and capacity building including an international consultancy to assist the project management.


  5. The sub-projects to be supported under the project should contribute to the following development objectives identified by the GoA as key for sustainable economic recovery and development in Aceh: (i) development of job-creating, market-driven enterprises engaged in value-added processing and manufacturing, especially in agriculture and fisheries; (ii) sustainable improvement of production quality and value in agriculture, fisheries and estate crops that contributes to alleviation of poverty; (iii) increase in international trade, especially direct exports; and (iv) increased domestic and foreign investment in Aceh. To achieve these goals, the EDFF will support sub-projects in the following broad areas: (i) Improving the business environment; (ii) Private Sector Support; and (iii) Public Infrastructure.
  6. The State Ministry for Disadvantaged Areas (KPDT) will be the GOI’s lead implementing agency at the central level. The implementation of the project rests with the GoA thru BAPPEDA Aceh, which will house the Project Management Unit (PMU) with support by an international consultant management firm. The sub-projects will be implemented by different entities (such as NGOs (local and international), private sector organizations and international aid agencies). They will prepare the sub-project application and be responsible for tracking performance of their individual sub-project consistent with the agreed upon milestones and performance indicators. The progress in achieving the project's objectives will be measured through a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation system. The World Bank will serve as the partner agency under the MDF legal framework and will be responsible for EDFF project supervision. The World Bank will conduct implementation reviews, as part of its normal supervision, on a semi-annual basis, supplemented by more frequent reviews during the initial implementation period.


  7. The project faces several risks, the most important of which are: that the GoA is not able to fulfill its role in overseeing the implementation of the project; weak governance and capacity at various levels impact the timely implementation of sub-projects; and the risk that conflict may recur. The mitigation measures identified are either currently underway, or are built into the project design. An Anti-Corruption Action Plan has been designed for the project, during implementation; World Bank team will monitor the elements of this Action Plan.

  8. Procurement will be carried out in accordance with the World Bank’s “Guidelines: Procurement under IBRD Loans and IDA Credits” dated May 2004 as amended in October 2006, “Guidelines: Selection and Employment of Consultants by World Bank Borrowers” dated May 2004 as amended in October 2006, and the provisions stipulated in the Grant Agreement. The accounting policies and procedures will substantially follow GOI’s financial management procedures, strengthened where appropriate. Grant expenditures and activities will be reported to the World Bank on a quarterly basis.
  9. The EDFF is classified as a B category project as defined in the World Bank Operational Policy. As such, all sub-projects to be financed by the EDFF must be in compliance with national environmental rules and regulations, as well as with environmental policies of the World Bank. The sub-projects that will be financed by the EDFF are small and medium scale and as such the level of associated social risks is limited. It is anticipated that none of the World Bank social safeguards policies will be triggered. There is a need to ensure that the project will benefit both men and women and takes women’s special needs into account, strengthening their participation in the economy and considers constraints to their participation. This will be addressed and monitored at the subproject level.



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