Dalai Lama Renaissance” (narrated by Harrison Ford) Produced and Directed by



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Dalai Lama Renaissance”

(narrated by Harrison Ford)

Produced and Directed by:

Khashyar Darvich


Narrated by:

Harrison Ford


Featuring:

The 14th Dalai Lama

Harrison Ford (narrator)

Dr. Michael Beckwith (from “the Secret”)

Fred Alan Wolf (from “the Secret” and “What the Bleep Do We Know”)

Amit Goswami (from “What the Bleep Do We Know)


Awards won:

10 film festival awards; Official Selection in 35 international film festivals


Summary of the Film:

“Dalai Lama Renaissance” is an 80 minute documentary film about forty of the world’s most innovative thinkers who travel to India in the Himalayan Mountains to meet with the Dalai Lama to solve many of the world’s problems. What happened was surprising and unexpected. Narrated by actor Harrison Ford, the film also features Quantum Physicists Fred Alan Wolf and Amit Gowami from “What the Bleep Do We Know,” and Michel Beckwith and Fred Alan Wolf from “the Secret.” Winner of 10 awards at film festivals around the world, it is the official selection of over 35 international film festivals.


Film Length (running time):

80 minutes


Date of Production:

2008
Website:



www.DalaiLamaFilm.com
Filmmaker Contact:
Khashyar Darvich

Producer-Director

Wakan Films

Email: information@DalaiLamaFilm.com

Phone: 310-772-8272

Awards for “Dalai Lama Renaissance”

Best Documentary Film

Monaco International Film Festival

Monte Carlo, Monaco

December 2007

Grand Jury Prize

(best narrative or documentary feature)

Canada International Film Festival

Vancouver, Canada

October 2007


Best Feature Documentary Film

Moondance International Film Festival

Universal Studios - Los Angeles

September 2007


Audience Award - Best Documentary Film

Moondance International Film Festival

Universal Studios - Los Angeles

September 2007


Grand Jury Special Prize

Barbados International Film Festival

Barbados

December 2007


KoshinoMiyako Award”

(only non-Asian film to win an award)

Global Peace Film Festival

KoshinoMiyako, Japan

October 2007


People’s Choice Award”

Frozen River Film Festival

Winona, Minnesota

January 2008


Audience Award - Best Documentary Film

Big Bear Lake International Film Festival

Big Bear Lake, California

September 2007


Peace Award

Monaco International Film Festival

Monte Carlo, Monaco

December 2007


Most Requested Film”

Sedona Film Festival

Sedona, Arizona

March 2008



Official Film Festival Selection:


  • Telluride MountainFilm Festival (May 25-28, 2007)




  • FilmFest Munich (Munich, Germany - June 22-30, 2007)



  • Rhode Island International Film Festival (Providence, RI - August 7-12, 2007)





  • Montreal World Film Festival (August 23 - September 3, 2007)




  • Rome International Film Festival (September 6-9, 2007)




  • Moondance International Film Festival at Universal Studios, L.A. (Sept. 7-9, 2007)




  • Bluegrass Independent Film Festival (Kentucky - September 6-9, 2007)




  • Temecula Valley International Film Festival - (California - September 12-16, 2007)




  • Big Bear Lake International Film Festival (Big Bear, CA - September 14-16, 2007)




  • Global Peace Film Festival - Orlando, Florida (September 26-30, 2007)




  • HatchFest - (Bozeman, Montana - October 3-7, 2007)




  • Taos Mountain Film Festival - (Taos, New Mexico - October 5-7, 2007)




  • Global Peace Film Festival - Koshinomiyako, Japan (October 5-7, 2007)




  • Cork Film Festival - (Ireland - October 14-21, 2007)




  • Canada International Film Festival (October 26-29, 2007)







  • Queens International Film Festival - (New York - November 8-11, 2007)




  • Monaco International Film Festival (December 6-9, 2007)




  • Bahamas International Film Festival - (December 6-9, 2007)




  • Barbados International Film Festival - (December 5-9, 2007)




  • Myrtle Beach International Film Festival - (December 5-8, 2007)




  • Kathmandu International Mountain Film Festival - (Nepal - December 7-11, 2007)




  • Frozen River Film Festival (January 24-27, 2008)




  • Victoria Independent Film and Video Festival (Victoria, Canada - Feb. 1-10, 2008)




  • Boulder International Film Festival (Boulder, Colorado - Feb. 14-17, 2008)




  • Sedona Film Festival (February 27 - March 2, 2008)




  • San Luis Obispo International Film Festival (California – March 7-16, 2008)




  • Tiburon International Film Festival (March 13 - March 21, 2008)



  • Lake Arrowhead Film Festival (California – April 10-13, 2008)





  • Da Vinci Film Festival (Corvallis, Oregon – April 18-20, 2008)




  • Newport Beach Film Festival (California – April 24- May 1, 2008)




  • Trento Film Festival (Trento, Italy – April 26 - May 4, 2008)




  • Tel Aviv Spirits Film Festival (Israel – May 14-17, 2008




  • Ecofilms – Rodos International Film Festival (Greece – June 24-29, 2008)




  • Peace on Earth Film Festival (Chicago – August, 2008)

Dalai Lama Renaissance” documentary (narrated by Harrison Ford)

ONE LINE SYNOPSIS:

Harrison Ford narrates this documentary about 40 of the world's leading thinkers who travel to India to meet with the Dalai Lama to solve many of the world's problems.



ONE LINE SYNOPSIS (version 2):

Forty of the world's leading thinkers travel to India to meet with the Dalai Lama to solve many of the world's problems. Narrated by Harrison Ford.



3-LINE SYNOPSIS.

Forty of the world’s most innovative thinkers travel to India in the Himalayan Mountains to meet with the Dalai Lama to solve many of the world’s problems. What happened was surprising and unexpected. Narrated by actor Harrison Ford.


100-WORD SYNOPSIS – version 1

“Dalai Lama Renaissance” is an 80 minute documentary film about forty of the world’s most innovative thinkers who travel to India in the Himalayan Mountains to meet with the Dalai Lama to solve many of the world’s problems. What happened was surprising and unexpected. Narrated by actor Harrison Ford, the film also features Quantum Physicists Fred Alan Wolf and Amit Gowami from “What the Bleep Do We Know,” and Michel Beckwith and Fred Alan Wolf from “the Secret.” Winner of 10 awards at film festivals around the world, it is the official selection of over 35 international film festivals.


100-WORD SYNOPSIS – version 2
At the edge of the Millennium, The Dalai Lama of Tibet invited 40 of the West’s leading, most innovative thinkers to his residence in the Himalayan Mountains of Northern India to discuss the world’s problems and how we can solve them. What transpired was unexpected and powerful, and captured by an 18-person 5-camera film crew. The film features Quantum Physicists Fred Alan Wolf and Amit Goswami (from “What the Bleep Do We Know”), Dr. Michael Beckwith (from “The Secret”), Revolutionary Social Scientist Jean Houston, and others. Beautifully filmed exotic scenery and Tibetan and Indian culture. Narrated by actor Harrison Ford.

250-WORD SYNOPSIS.

At the edge of the Millennium, The Dalai Lama invited 40 of the West’s leading, most innovative thinkers in their respective fields to his residence tucked away in the Himalayan mountains of Northern India to discuss the world’s problems and how we can solve them. What transpired was unexpected and powerful, and was captured by an 18 person, 5 camera film crew. Producer-Director Khashyar Darvich and took an 18 person crew to India and shot more than 140 hours of video footage during the week-long meeting and exploration of the future of mankind-- enough gripping and beautiful footage to make a powerful and cinematic documentary. The resulting feature-length documentary, “Dalai Lama Renaissance,” is narrated by actor Harrison Ford, and features stars from the hit theatrical documentary film “What the Bleep Do We Know” (Quantum physicists Fred Alan Wolfe and Amit Goswami), and Dr. Michael Bernard Beckwith (AGAPE and the film “The Secret”). World-Class original music for the film has been composed by: Roop Verma, a master sitar player and a protégé of the legendary Ravi Shankar; Henry Reid (a contributor to the Grammy-winning group “Manheim Steamroller”), and virtuoso Tibetan musician Tashi Dhondup Sharzur.


Prominent Quotes about “Dalai Lama Renaissance”

*********************************************************************

Harrison Ford statement about “Dalai Lama Renaissance”:

"I narrated ‘Dalai Lama Renaissance,’” says Harrison Ford, “because I believe His Holiness is making a positive influence in our world. For me, the film represented an opportunity to continue assisting the optimistic efforts of an extraordinary individual.”


-Actor Harrison Ford

*********************************************************************

Dalai Lama statement about Filmmakers of

“Dalai Lama Renaissance”


After one of Darvich’s interviews with the Dalai Lama, the Dalai Lama affirmed Darvich’s and Wakan Films’ motivations in producing films-- “Yes I like your questions,” the Dalai Lama told Darvich, as the two were standing together talking after the interview. “Certainly, your effort can make some contribution—there’s no doubt.”



*********************************************************************

PRESS RELEASE:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE



Harrison Ford Narrates Documentary Film about Dalai Lama
LOS ANGELES, Calif. - Actor Harrison Ford is narrating a new documentary film about the Dalai Lama, entitled “Dalai Lama Renaissance” (www.DalaiLamaFilm.com).
Film Critic John Griffin of the Montreal Gazette calls Dalai Lama Renaissance “a provocative, even enlightening film” and “fascinating, ravishingly beautiful and sonically soothing.
The 80 minute documentary has won 10 film festival awards around the world, including:

Best Documentary Film” - Monaco International Film Festival (Monte Carlo, Monaco), “Grand Jury Prize” - Canada International Film Festival (best feature from among narrative and documentary feature-length films), “Best Feature Documentary Film” - Moondance International Film Festival (Universal Studios in Los Angeles), “Audience Award - Best Documentary Film” - Moondance International Film Festival, “KoshinoMiyako Award” - Global Peace Film Festival - KoshinoMiyako, Japan (the only non-Asian film to win an award at the festival), and the “Audience Award - Best Documentary Film” - Big Bear Lake International Film Festival (CA), “Peace Award” - Monaco International Film Festival, “Grand Jury Special Prize” - Barbados International Film Festival, “People’s Choice Award” – Frozen River Film Festival (Minnesota), “Most Requested Film” – Sedona Film Festival.

The film has been accepted to over 35 film festivals around the world, including four sold-out screenings at the Montreal World Film Festival (August 25-28, 2007), three sold-out screenings at FilmFest Munich (Germany - June 22-30, 2007), and sold-out screenings at the Telluride MountainFilm Festival (May 2007). It has also been accepted to the Monaco International Film Festival, 52nd Cork Film Festival in Ireland, and several other international film festivals.

"I narrated ‘Dalai Lama Renaissance,’” says Harrison Ford, “because I believe His Holiness is making a positive influence in our world. For me, the film represented an opportunity to continue assisting the optimistic efforts of an extraordinary individual.” Ford is also starring in “Indian Jones 4,” which is directed by Stephen Spielberg and will be released in May 2008.


“Dalai Lama Renaissance” is only among a small handful of documentaries that Ford has chosen to narrate during his career. Ford has starred in such blockbuster films as “Raider of the Lost Ark” & the “Indiana Jones” movies, “Star Wars,” “The Fugitive,” “Witness,” and many others. Harrison Ford’s films have the second highest worldwide box office gross (over $5.5 billion) of any actor in history. Ford is also starring in “Indian Jones 4,” which is directed by Stephen Spielberg and will be released in May 2008.

“Dalai Lama Renaissance”- produced, directed and co-edited by filmmaker Khashyar Darvich- is the story of 40 Western innovative thinkers who travel to India in the Himalayan Mountains to meet with the Dalai Lama to solve many of the world’s problems. What happened was surprising and unexpected, and was captured by a five camera, 18 person crew.

The film also features two of the starring quantum physicists from the hit documentary “What the Bleep Do We Know,” Physicists Fred Alan Wolf and Ami Goswami. Also appearing in “Dalai Lama Renaissance” are Dr. Michael Bernard Beckwith (founder and director of Agape International Spiritual Center, who appears in the film “The Secret” with Wolf), ground-breaking social scientist Jean Houston and author and radio host Thom Hartmann.
The film has a world-class music soundtrack that includes original music from one of the master sitar players in the world, Roop Verma, who is a protégé of legendary Indian musicians Ravi Shankar and Ali Akbar Khan. One of the top three Tibetan musicians in the West, Tashi Dhondup Sharzur, has also recorded original music for the film. Composer Henry Reid, who has contributed to the Grammy-Award-Winning group “Manheim Steamroller,” is composing the Western music.
Robert McFalls, one of the editors of the Academy Award-winning Documentary “American Dream,” is Co-Editor of “Dalai Lama Renaissance” with Darvich.
Producer-Director Khashyar Darvich spent six years producing and editing “Dalai Lama Renaissance,” and funded the film independently since he wanted to make sure that the film would be made with the highest integrity.
After one of Darvich’s interviews with the Dalai Lama, the Dalai Lama affirmed Darvich’s and Wakan Films’ motivations in producing films-- “Yes I like your questions,” the Dalai Lama told Darvich, as the two were standing together talking after the interview. “Certainly, your effort can make some contribution—there’s no doubt.”
“Dalai Lama Renaissance” is schedule for release in theaters in the Spring 2008. For more information, please see www.DalaiLamaFilm.com, or contact Wakan Films at: information@DalaiLamaFilm.com or 310-772-8272.

Three film trailer for “Dalai Lama Renaissance” can be found here: http://www.dalailamafilm.com/trailer.html

The Electronic Press Kit for the film can be found here: http://dalailamafilm.com/press/
Contact Information:

Wakan Films

3223 Bennett Drive

Unit #C


Hollywood, CA 90068

310-772-8272



www.DalaiLamaFilm.com

Information@DalaiLamaFilm.com

###





February 2008

www.LAyogamagazine.com








Review – “Dalai Lama Renaissance”

(a documentary by Khashyar Darvich)
By Amy Wong

LA Yoga magazine



February 2008
When speaking about the work of director Darvich, the venerated Tibetan leader gave high praise: “I like your questions… very good. Certainly, your efforts can make some sort of contribution, there’s no doubt.” Renaissance, narrated by Harrison Ford, fulfilled these seemingly prophetic words, winning numerous awards while touring the film festival circuit.

Renaissance documents the 1999 Synthesis Conference held in Dharamsala (the residence of the exiled monk), where 40 of the world’s most prominent thinkers assembled for a week to dialogue about how to solve our planet’s problems. Some participants had especially visible roles in Renaissance, including Your Money of Your Life author Vicki Robbin; prominent quantum physicists and What the Bleep alums Fred Alan Wolf and Amit Goswami; and the nonviolence-promoting interfaith bridge-builder Brother Wayne Teasdale, the whom the film is dedicated (he passed away in 2004).

The Synthesis participants are some of the most intellectual, spiritual and noted people on Earth. Even they displayed misbehaving egos; chaos and dissent ensued even though the setting was the Dalai Lama’s spiritual home. The manner in which Darvich captured the group’s breakdowns, as well as the humorous and skillful way the Synthesis organizers handled them, is a major strength of the film.
“It is a stunning tour-de-force”
Another Renaissance highlight is, of course, the intimate glimpse into the Dalai Lama’s life in India, set to an uplifting soundtrack: it is a stunning tour-de-force of Himalayan scenery, prayer wheels, monkeys, monks of all ages and even candid poverty.
Throughout the imagery and stories, it was refreshing to see everyone’s humanity. But fitting, since the Dalai Lama, who often refers to himself as just a simple monk, is quoted in the film as saying “we’re all equal here.” This monk gave a spell-binding and ego-shaking closing conference and film speech in which he reminded the participants that putting all of humanity first and working towards their own inner peace is the only true answer to solving any problem. His sentiments were echoed in a quote from Leo Tolstoy, read by narrator Ford: “Everybody thinks of changing humanity, and nobody thinks of changing himself.”

October 04, 2007







The "Tibet Within" – DALAI LAMA RENAISSANCE – at Global Peace Film Festival Japan Oct 5-7


by Jean Miyake Downey, Kyoto Journal


D
A revelatory documentary”
ALAI LAMA RENAISSANCE
will be one of the films screened at the Global Peace Film Festival Japan Oct 5-7 in Koshinomiyako. The trailer is wonderful to view, if you can't get to one of the festivals showing this film.

This is a revelatory documentary about the "Everyman" journey from egocentric consciousness to something more sublime. The film follows forty global experts in their fields who traveled to Dharamsala to advise the Dalai Lama. The first scenes reveal a hilariously clashing hootenanny of mild-mannered Engaged Buddhists, solemn Catholics, gabby physicists intent on demonstrating the convergence of quantum physics with ultimate reality, New Agers dressed in purple, social change visionaries, and progressive economists, all engaged in "synthesizing" and "witnessing" brain-storming to collect all their brilliant ideas to present to the fourteenth Dalai Lama. This well-educated and well-mannered group then revolted against their endlessly patient facilitators, in a gray-haired inverse variation of the "Lord of the Flies." Throughout the chaos that ensued, each player was shown as confronting her or his own ego, as much as they confronted the facilitators and fellow participants. Their conflicts with each other, and most of all, with their own egos were actually uplifting, as they struggled to be truthful and respectful while their "bubbling over" clashed with the facilitators' attempts to create some order out of the unwieldy explosion of dialogue.

Then something broke open.

Tenzin Gyatso, who kept referred to himself as nothing but a "simple monk," spoke." And, what he said, and the way he said it sounded like a clear, clear bell that shattered all the clashing mental abstractions, and brought attention back to the human level... I thought I was viewing a shaktipat moment as I saw the transformations of the participants simply becoming more of who they really are, as whatever was obscuring their inner radiance fell away. i actually felt as if I was feeling some of that myself, as if these wonderful shaktipat energies were emanating from the small movie screen I was watching, to me, my friend who was watching with me, and all the people around us.

Compassion. Joy. Happiness. Even while suffering in participation and/or witness with and struggling to address the world's problems.

A beautiful and fresh window on the Dalai Lama”

This is a beautiful and fresh window on the Dalai Lama, and what we in the world who care can do for Tibet and Tibetans. Before the film started, I was apprehensive I would hear all the same-old records about the plight of Tibetan Buddhists, and although I support the Dalai Lama's and all Tibetans cause, from the bottom of my heart, I can't help but partly tune out when I hear the worn-out views. However, this film was startlingly original. I know so many of Tenzin Gyatso's words by heart by now, but in this documentary, it all sounded so new to me, as if hearing his wisdom for the first time.


This film was startlingly original”


To share with my media friends, I wrote what the Dalai Lama said media people ought to aim for in their writing: "to promote clearly basic human values." He spoke about supporting and loving Chinese people, at the same time supporters of Tibet encourage the Chinese government to open to rapprochement towards a win-win solution for Tibetans and Chinese. It's not either-or, except at the level of egocentricity, in his view. As Einstein said, we can't solve problems at the same level of consciousness that created them.

Some of the participants talked about the importance of our getting in touch with our "Inner Tibets." I disagreed with the view that we have a choice of addressing either an 'inner" or "outer" Tibet. I have always believed that profound personal journeys go in both directions, and I see many "Tibets" throughout the world, as well as within every person.

My friend Morley Robertson also talks about the 'Tibet Within" in an original, fresh, and beautiful way at his start-up experimental multiple media (video, music, and diary) blog on travels through Tibet, TIBETRONICA:

"This web site "Tibetronica" will also be a journey along the time axis. Various ideas will evolve from scratch and become embodied through experimentation and research, finally into a complete (or incomplete) piece. I aim to make the entire process as transparent as I can. Trying to break away from clichés and my own preconceptions about Tibet, I will carry on with my experiments.

"The early phase of this project will be an attempt to travel to the 'Tibet within'. If there is indeed a secret land inside, I would like to look for it, before I leave home for the Tibet that is far away."

The journey and film also reminded me of Rodger Kamenetz' The Jew in the Lotus, his allegorical account of the 1990 pilgrimage that a group of American Jewish leaders made to Dharamsala to advise the Dalai Lama on how to support the survival of Tibetans and Tibetan culture in indefinite exile. Their archetypal journey led to much more than the ostensible goals they were seeking, as well, for both the Tibetans and the Jewish teachers involved, and for so many who were touched by the ripple effects of their experience. Kamenetz himself has morphed from a nervous on-the-sidelines chronicler of the Tibetan-Jewish pilgrimage to a guide of the inner pilgrimage, in his new book released this fall, The History of Last Night's Dream, a luminous book infused with Tibetan, kabbalistic, and Jungian wisdom, also with fascinating reader input gleaned from Rodger's wonderful blog, Talking Dream.


Om mani padme hum.

Biography of the 14th Dalai Lama

His Holiness the XIVth Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso, is the spiritual and temporal leader of the Tibetan people. He was born in a small village called Takster in northeastern Tibet. Born to a peasant family, His Holiness was recognized at the age of two, in accordance with Tibetan tradition, as the reincarnation of his predecessor the 13th Dalai Lama. The Dalai Lamas are the manifestations of the Bodhisattva of Compassion, who chose to reincarnate to serve the people. Dalai Lama means Ocean of Wisdom. Tibetans normally refer to His Holiness as Yeshin Norbu, the Wish-fulfilling Gem, or simply, Kundun, meaning The Presence.

He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1989.

(-from the Nobel Foundation's website:  http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/1989/lama-bio.html)

 

Detailed Biography of the Dalai Lama:

His Holiness the 14th the Dalai Lama Tenzin Gyatso, is the head of state and spiritual leader of the Tibetan people. He was born Lhamo Dhondrub on 6 July 1935, in a small village called Taktser in northeastern Tibet. Born to a peasant family, His Holiness was recognized at the age of two, in accordance with Tibetan tradition, as the reincarnation of his predecessor the 13th Dalai Lama, and thus an incarnation Avalokitesvara, the Buddha of Compassion.

The Dalai Lamas are the manifestations of the Bodhisattva (Buddha) of Compassion, who chose to reincarnate to serve the people. Lhamo Dhondrub was, as Dalai Lama, renamed Jetsun Jamphel Ngawang Lobsang Yeshe Tenzin Gyatso - Holy Lord, Gentle Glory, Compassionate, Defender of the Faith, Ocean of Wisdom. Tibetans normally refer to His Holiness as Yeshe Norbu, the Wishfulfilling Gem or simply Kundun - The Presence.

The enthronement ceremony took place on February 22, 1940 in Lhasa, the capital of Tibet.


Education in Tibet

He began his education at the age of six and completed the Geshe Lharampa Degree (Doctorate of Buddhist Philosophy) when he was 25 in 1959. At 24, he took the preliminary examinations at each of the three monastic universities: Drepung, Sera and Ganden. The final examination was conducted in the Jokhang, Lhasa during the annual Monlam Festival of Prayer, held in the first month of every year Tibetan calendar.


Leadership Responsibilities

On November 17, 1950, His Holiness was called upon to assume full political power (head of the State and Government) after some 80,000 Peoples Liberation Army soldiers invaded Tibet. In 1954, he went to Beijing to talk peace with Mao Tse-tung and other Chinese leaders, including Chou En-lai and Deng Xiaoping. In 1956, while visiting India to attend the 2500th Buddha Jayanti Anniversary, he had a series of meetings with Prime Minister Nehru and Premier Chou about deteriorating conditions in Tibet.

His efforts to bring about a peaceful solution to Sino-Tibetan conflict were thwarted by Bejing's ruthless policy in Eastern Tibet, which ignited a popular uprising and resistance. This resistance movement spread to other parts of the country. On 10 March 1959 the capital of Tibet, Lhasa, exploded with the largest demonstration in Tibetan history, calling on China to leave Tibet and reaffirming Tibet's independence. The Tibetan National Uprising was brutally crushed by the Chinese army. His Holiness escaped to India where he was given political asylum. Some 80,000 Tibetan refugees followed His Holiness into exile. Today, there are more than 120,000 Tibetan in exile. Since 1960, he has resided in Dharamsala, India, known as "Little Lhasa," the seat of the Tibetan Government-in-exile.

In the early years of exile, His Holiness appealed to the United Nations on the question of Tibet, resulting in three resolutions adopted by the General Assembly in 1959, 1961, and 1965, calling on China to respect the human rights of Tibetans and their desire for self-determination. With the newly constituted Tibetan Government-in-exile, His Holiness saw that his immediate and urgent task was to save the both the Tibetan exiles and their culture alike. Tibetan refugees were rehabilitated in agricultural settlements. Economic development was promoted and the creation of a Tibetan educational system was established to raise refugee children with full knowledge of their language, history, religion and culture. The Tibetan Institute of Performing Arts was established in 1959, while the Central Institute of Higher Tibetan Studies became a university for Tibetans in India. Over 200 monasteries have been re-established to preserve the vast corpus of Tibetan Buddhist teachings, the essence of the Tibetan way of life.

In 1963, His Holiness promulgated a democratic constitution, based on Buddhist principles and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as a model for a future free Tibet. Today, members of the Tibetan parliament are elected directly by the people. The members of the Tibetan Cabinet are elected by the parliament, making the Cabinet answerable to the Parliament. His Holiness has continuously emphasized the need to further democratise the Tibetan administration and has publicly declared that once Tibet regains her independence he will not hold political office.

In Washington, D.C., at the Congressional Human Rights Caucus in 1987, he proposed a Five-Point Peace Plan as a first step toward resolving the future status of Tibet. This plan calls for the designation of Tibet as a zone of peace, an end to the massive transfer of ethnic Chinese into Tibet, restoration of fundamental human rights and democratic freedoms, and the abandonment of China's use of Tibet for nuclear weapons production and the dumping of nuclear waste, as well as urging "earnest negotiations" on the future of Tibet.

In Strasbourg, France, on 15 June 1988, he elaborated the Five-Point Peace Plan and proposed the creation of a self-governing democratic Tibet, "in association with the People's Republic of China."

On 2 September 1991, the Tibetan Government-in-exile declared the Strasbourg Proposal invalid because of the closed and negative attitude of the present Chinese leadership towards the ideas expressed in the proposal.

On 9 October 1991, during an address at Yale University in the United States, His Holiness said that he wanted to visit Tibet to personally assess the political situation. He said, "I am extremely anxious that, in this explosive situation, violence may break out. I want to do what I can to prevent this.... My visit would be a new opportunity to promote understanding and create a basis for a negotiated solution."


Contact with West and East

Since 1967, His Holiness initiated a series of journeys which have taken him to some 46 nations. In autumn of 1991, he visited the Baltic States at the invitation of Lithuanian President Vytautas Landsbergis of Lithuania and became the first foreign leader to address the Lithuanian Parliament. His Holiness met with the late Pope Paul VI at the Vatican in 1973. At a press conference in Rome in 1980, he outlined his hopes for the meeting with John Paul II: "We live in a period of great crisis, a period of troubling world developments. It is not possible to find peace in the soul without security and harmony between peoples. For this reason, I look forward with faith and hope to my meeting with the Holy Father; to an exchange of ideas and feelings, and to his suggestions, so as to open the door to a progressive pacification between peoples." His Holiness met Pope John Paul II at the Vatican in 1980, 1982, 1986, 1988 and 1990. In 1981, His Holiness talked with Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr. Robert Runcie, and with other leaders of the Anglican Church in London. He also met with leaders of the Roman Catholic and Jewish communities and spoke at an interfaith service held in his honor by the World Congress of Faiths: "I always believe that it is much better to have a variety of religions, a variety of philosophies, rather than one single religion or philosophy. This is necessary because of the different mental dispositions of each human being. Each religion has certain unique ideas or techniques, and learning about them can only enrich one's own faith."


Recognition and Awards

Since his first visit to the west in the early 1973, a number of western universities and institutions have conferred Peace Awards and honorary Doctorate Degrees in recognition of His Holiness' distinguished writings in Buddhist philosophy and for his leadership in the solution of international conflicts, human rights issues and global environmental problems. In presenting the Raoul Wallenberg Congressional Human Rights Award in 1989, U.S. Congressman Tom Lantos said, "His Holiness the Dalai Lama's courageous struggle has distinguished him as a leading proponent of human rights and world peace. His ongoing efforts to end the suffering of the Tibetan people through peaceful negotiations and reconciliation have required enormous courage and sacrifice."


The 1989 Nobel Peace Prize

The Norwegian Nobel Committee's decision to award the 1989 Peace Prize to His Holiness the Dalai Lama won worldwide praise and applause, with exception of China. The CommitteeÕs citation read, "The Committee wants to emphasize the fact that the Dalai Lama in his struggle for the liberation of Tibet consistently has opposed the use of violence. He has instead advocated peaceful solutions based upon tolerance and mutual respect in order to preserve the historical and cultural heritage of his people."

On 10 December 1989, His Holiness accepted the prize on the behalf of oppressed everywhere and all those who struggle for freedom and work for world peace and the people of Tibet. In his remarks he said, "The prize reaffirms our conviction that with truth, courage and determination as our weapons, Tibet will be liberated. Our struggle must remain nonviolent and free of hatred."

He also had a message of encouragement for the student-led democracy movement in China. "In China the popular movement for democracy was crushed by brutal force in June this year. But I do not believe the demonstrations were in vain, because the spirit of freedom was rekindled among the Chinese people and China cannot escape the impact of this spirit of freedom sweeping in many parts of the world. The brave students and their supporters showed the Chinese leadership and the world the human face of that great nations."


A Simple Buddhist monk

His Holiness often says, "I am just a simple Buddhist monk - no more, nor less."

His Holiness follows the life of Buddhist monk. Living in a small cottage in Dharamsala, he rises at 4 A.M. to meditate, pursues an ongoing schedule of administrative meetings, private audiences and religious teachings and ceremonies. He concludes each day with further prayer before retiring. In explaining his greatest sources of inspiration, he often cites a favorite verse, found in the writings of the renowned eighth century Buddhist saint Shantideva:

 

For as long as space endures


And for as long as living beings remain,
Until then may I too abide
To dispel the misery of the world.

For as long as space endures
And for as long as living beings remain,

Until then may I too abide
To dispel the misery of the world.


Filmmaker Biography of Producer-Director Khashyar Darvich

Biography Summary:

Producer-Director Khashyar Darvich has won numerous awards for his documentaries and other projects that have been broadcast nationally, including on the History Channel, CBS, NBC and PBS. Khashyar strives and is committed to producing positive projects that are both artistically satisfying and that impact audiences in a positive and fulfilling way. In 2000, he founded and is President of a 501(c)(3) nonprofit foundation, “The Wakan Foundation for the Arts,” which has the mission of “serving and uplifting humanity through the arts.” Khashyar was committed to producing “Dalai Lama Renaissance” because of the unique transformation that occurred during that special event, and as it became obvious that what was captured by the cameras had all the elements of an extraordinary film. Some of Khashyar’s previous work includes: the History Channel and PBS award-winning documentary “Black Hawk Waltz: Tales of a Rocky Mountain Town,” about an eccentric Colorado mountain town, a true-life “Northern Exposure;” The “Coach Parks” documentary, about a high school coach who devotes himself to helping the poor, and who many professional athletes like Joe Montana come to for physical, personal and spiritual conditioning; “Saving the Redwood Forests,” a television PSA about saving the Redwood Forests that has won 15 awards to date; and other projects. After “Dalai Lama Renaissance,” he will be producing a documentary about “ordinary individuals doing extraordinary things for peace,” which will feature the remarkable stories of several prominent and inspiring people who are doing their part to create positive change.

 

Detailed Biography:

Khashyar Darvich was born in Washington D.C. in 1966, and then moved to the beautiful northern mountains and coast of Iran where he lived for four years. Even though he was young when he lived in the Caspian Sea region of Mazanderan (Iran), the lush nature, friendly people, and plentiful animals made a lasting impression on him, and gave him a deep respect and love of animals and nature. After moving back to the U.S. to Dayton, Ohio in 1970, Khashyar and his family again moved to Oxford, Ohio in 1972 when he was 6-years-old, so that his father (Djamchid) could begin a Ph.D. program in Political Science at Miami University of Ohio. Khashyar graduated in the top of his class from Talawanda High School (in Oxford) in 1984, where he studied drama and wrote and directed a one-act play, "The Coming of the Fish." It was in high school, that Khashyar began writing poetry and songs in his journal during slower periods in his classes. He also became a vegetarian at that time, because of the influence of a high school friend who was a vegetarian.

He attended the Liberal Arts "Western" Program at Miami University from 1984-1986, taking film and liberal arts courses. In 1987, he transferred to Baldwin-Wallace College near Cleveland, Ohio where he majored in English/Creative Writing. His undergraduate creative writing poetry professor, the late poet Paula Rankin, wrote him:

 "So far, you are the only student I can say this to-- You already are a poet; you will be published and read, appreciated, studied seriously; you will have books after you've published in many magazines and journals... Now all you have to do is keep reading, reading, reading, and writing, writing, writing."

After he graduated from Baldwin-Wallace College in 1991, he then moved to Boulder, Colorado, to resume his writing, and worked for Toy and Game inventor Harvey ("Hank") Kramer, who invented the children's games "Mousetrap" and "Toss Across," as well as having sculpted the horse logo for the Mustang car, and invented the character "Mr. Clean." Hank had multiple sclerosis and could not move his arms or legs, and Khashyar acted as a personal assistant, and marveled at Hank's incredible stories of meeting Howard Hughes in Los Angeles at a private party, being a rodeo cowboy, a professional sculptor, and working as a toy inventor.

After Khashyar worked for Hank Kramer, in 1992 he studied Creative Writing at the University of Colorado, as well as taught Creative Writing to undergraduate students. But he wanted to pursue his writing outside of the structured environment of a University, so he continued writing on his own, and began working as a news reporter in the Colorado Rocky Mountains.

Although Khashyar loved the deep personal expression of writing poetry (which spoke to his soul), he also felt a deep calling to reach out to a wider audience than his poetry would allow him to. So, he began writing screenplays, beginning with his first, "Many Hidden Fires," a Native American Western infused with Native American mythology, spirituality and culture. During the time he was writing on the script (in 1993 and 1994), he decided on the name of his film production company, "Wakan Films," which he would use as a vehicle to produce his scripts. Wakan is the Lakota Native American term that means "in the spirit of the Great Spirit (i.e., God)," or "having qualities of the Great Spirit." Khashyar had an inner belief that it was important to use the creative opportunities that he was given to serve Humanity and the Greatest Good.

Darvich contacted actors who he felt might be right for "Many Hidden Fires," and sent "Many hidden Fires" to Country Music Legend Johnny Cash, who read Darvich's script one weekend at his weekend cabin in Tennessee. Johnny Cash liked his script, and expressed interest in playing one of the roles in a film, if the project received funding. It was during this time, that Johnny Cash released his highly acclaimed acoustic album "American Recordings," in 1994, which would launch a resurgence of his career. But Darvich had a difficult time raising money to turn his script into a film.

About this time, as he was writing news stories as a newspaper report near the small Colorado mountain town of Black Hawk, Colorado, that he came up with the idea of producing a documentary film about the quirky history of Black Hawk, Colorado (about one hour west of Denver), which had an interesting and eccentric population, and which was dramatically changed after the introduction of gambling to the former gold mining town.

It seemed that everything came easily on the Black Hawk Documentary. 

While waiting for a connecting flight to Los Angeles, where Khashyar was going to have his "Many Hidden Fires" script read by Hollywood actors,  he saw another man sitting on the carpet of the airport gate also reading a film script. Khashyar introduced himself. That man was documentary Producer-Director Dennis Aig, who had worked on two documentaries about Robert Redford's films: "A River Runs Through It," and "The Horse Whisperer." Darvich was right that Aig's Documentary film experience would help in raising money for the Black Hawk Documentary, and a few weeks later, they received over $100,000 to create the feature-length documentary film "Black Hawk Waltz: Tales of a Rocky Mountain Town," which in 1996-1997, was broadcast several times on the History Channel and PBS stations, and won several awards.

Darvich continued writing film scripts, including "Farewell to Rumi," about an Iranian-American family, Sufism and poetry, which is based mostly on Khashyar's experiences as a youth while growing up in Ohio, and wrote 5 scripts in all, one novel and hundreds of poems.

But as more documentary work came his way, he realized that perhaps he was meant to produce and direct documentary films, so he began focusing his energy on documentaries.

He moved to the San Francisco Bay area of Northern California, and met fellow filmmaker David Mueller, who he felt a connected with in regards to having a positive social purpose in filmmaking.

In fact, by this time, Darvich believed that it was only worth putting his energies into filmmaking, if the projects that he produced and directed were uplifting and have a positive message, as well as being artistically compelling.

Through Darvich's "Wakan Films," Darvich and Mueller worked on a documentary about peace (in which Darvich interviewed the well-known poet, director and author Dr. Maya Angelou, Western actor Dennis Weaver, His Holiness the Dalai Lama, author John Robbins, as well as others).

When interviewing Dr. Maya Angelou (who is a Tony, Emmy and Pulitzer Prize nominated author, actress and director, and who wrote a poem by request for the inauguration of President Bill Clinton), Darvich mentioned to Angelou that he stuttered for most of his life. Angelou mentioned that her brother also stuttered.

Khashyar has spoken with a stutter for most of his life, but has achieved what he has wanted, including teaching creative writing at the University level, reporting, and producing and directing films. He has seen it as a blessing because of the many things that he has learned as a result of it, like to communicate clearly through written words, to accept others, and that human beings have the unlimited capacity to create and achieve what they are inspired to in life. He believes that nothing can stop a person who is determined, and that inner vision, clarity, drive, and working with spiritual truth are the most important factors in achievement.

He, with Director David Mueller, also produced a television piece about "Saving the Redwood Forests," which was aired on national television and won 14 awards, as well as a documentary film ("Coach Parks") about an inspiring high school coach (coach Ben Parks) who also devotes himself to helping the poor, and trains the minds, bodies and spirits of professional athletes like San Francisco 49 legends Jerry Rice and Joe Montana.

In 2000, Khashyar decided that the best way to support the positive projects that he wanted to create was to Produce films under a non-profit foundation, so he established a non-profit 501(c)(3) foundation, "The Wakan Foundation for the Arts," which has the mission of "serving and uplifting Humanity and the Greatest Good through the arts."

One of Darvich's friends who he had interviewed for a past project, author Jerry Jampolsky, was invited to attend a conference in Dharamsala, India with the Dalai Lama about solving some of the world's problems. The organizers of the event needed a documentary crew, and Jampolsky recommended Darvich and Wakan Films because of the spirit with which they worked while filming and interviewing Jampolsky.

Darvich and Wakan Films was offered the Dalai Lama documentary project 8 weeks before they would need to travel to India, and so Darvich found an inspired and professional film crew from the San Francisco area that committed to traveling to India and work 14 hour days to capture the event.

The 140 hours of video footage that the 18 person 5 camera film crew captured developed into Darvich's current documentary, "Dalai Lama Renaissance."

During Darvich's second interview with the Dalai Lama, the Dalai Lama turned to Darvich and said:

"Yes, I like your questions-- very good... Certainly, your efforts can make some contribution-- There's no doubt."

Darvich believes that everyone has their purpose and path in life, and to be truly fulfilled, we must search within ourselves in our quiet inner space and discover our purpose.

Darvich believes that his purpose in life is to serve Humanity and the Greatest Good through filmmaking.

Khashyar is also editing a companion DVD for "Dalai Lama Renaissance," which contains the best of His Holiness the Dalai Lama's talks during the "Dalai Lama Renaissance" meeting. "Dalai Lama Renaissance" Music Producer and Sound Designer Michel Tyabji is Producing a companion soundtrack CD to the film, which is expected to be released also in 2007.

After "Dalai Lama Renaissance," Darvich plans to produce a documentary about ordinary individuals who do extraordinary things for peace, and also another special documentary about the American side of his family, using 6.5 hours of family home movies from the late 1930s until the late 1960s.

Khashyar is open to other offers and suggestions of powerful, life-affirming film projects that serve the Greatest Good.



Khashyar lives in Hollywood, California, with his wife Lena and his African Grey parrot "Bodhi," who can already say "I love you," "Hello" (with both an American and European accent), "Bye bye," "Kiss ("mwaa, mwaa"), "come here," and "No, Bodhi, no," and other cute things.

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