Delta state university


Master of Education in Elementary Education Degree Program



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Master of Education in Elementary Education Degree Program


TABLE I.B – Student Learning Outcomes


A. Learner Outcome

What should a graduate in the
M. Ed. in Elementary Education
major know, value, or be able to do at graduation and beyond?

B. Data Collection & Analysis

1. What assessment tools and/or methods will you use to determine achievement of the learning outcome? 2. Describe how the data from these tools and/or methods will be/have been collected.

3.Explain the procedure to analyze the data.

C. Results of Evaluation

What were the findings of the analysis?

D. Use of Evaluation Results

1.List any specific recommendations.

2. Describe changes in curriculum, courses, or procedures that are proposed or were made/ are being made as a result of the program learning outcome assessment process.

#1 Demonstrate understanding of knowledge and skills associated with the content of the M. Ed. degree program in Elementary education

1. Content and pedagogical content knowledge will be assessed using a comprehensive examination.

2. The comprehensive examination will be administered each semester and each summer session to candidates in the final course of the M. Ed.

3. A rubric will be used to evaluate the exams. Distribution of scores will be analyzed to assess strengths and weaknesses in the program.

The comprehensive examination is linked to both the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) 1 for the middle childhood/generalist (Standard II, Knowledge of Content and Curriculum), and the early childhood generalist (Standard V, Knowledge of Integrated Curriculum). These standards relate directly to knowledge/skills that elementary teachers need in order to understand what needs to be taught. (See Appendix B, Scoring Guide/Rubric 5 for the comprehensive examination scoring rubric.)



Campus

Eleven campus M. Ed. majors took the comprehensive exam. Eleven candidates responded to items for CEL 610, CEL 618, & CRD 624, which is a requirement for Comps. Of the 11 responses for CEL 610, 3 received target ratings, 7 received acceptable ratings, and 1 received an unacceptable rating. Of the 11 responses for CEL 618, 4 received target ratings, 6 received acceptable ratings, and 2 received an unacceptable rating. Of the 11 responses for CRD 624, 3 received target ratings, 8 received acceptable ratings, and none received an unacceptable rating. Candidates had choices between the following courses: CEL 611, CEL 613, CEL 617, CEL 620, CEL 621, CEL 625, & CEL 630. Nine candidates responded to CEL 611 with 3 receiving target ratings, 5 receiving acceptable ratings, and 1 receiving a rating of unacceptable. Seven candidates responded to CEL 620 with 2 receiving target ratings and 5 receiving acceptable ratings. Seven candidates responded to CEL 621 with 1 receiving a target rating and 6 receiving acceptable ratings. Five candidates responded to CEL 625 with 2 receiving a target rating and 3 receiving acceptable ratings. Six candidates responded to CEL 630 with 2 receiving a target rating and 4 receiving acceptable ratings.

Overall, the candidates demonstrated comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the important concepts and topics encountered throughout the M. Ed. program of study. The greatest weakness was noted for responses to CEL 618- Elementary Curriculum. However, CEL 618 also yielded the largest number (4) of target ratings.

Online

Twenty-three online M. Ed. majors took the comprehensive exam. Nineteen passed and 5 failed. Twenty-three candidates responded to items for CEL 610, CEL 618, & CRD 624, which is a requirement for Comps. Of the 23 responses for CEL 610, 5 received target ratings, 14 received acceptable ratings, and 4 received an unacceptable rating. Of the 23 responses for CEL 618, 4 received target ratings,11 received acceptable ratings, and 8 received an unacceptable rating. Of the 23 responses for CRD 624, 7 received target ratings, 12 received acceptable ratings, and 4 received an unacceptable rating. Candidates had choices between the following courses: CEL 611, CEL 620, CEL 621, & CEL 630. Nineteen candidates responded to CEL 611 with 4 receiving target ratings, 11 receiving acceptable ratings, and 4 receiving a rating of unacceptable. Six candidates responded to CEL 620 with 2 receiving target ratings, 8 receiving acceptable ratings, and 5 receiving unacceptable ratings. Eleven candidates responded to CEL 621 with 2 receiving a target rating, 7 receiving acceptable ratings, and 2 receiving an unacceptable rating. Nineteen candidates responded to CEL 630 with 3 receiving a target rating, 13 receiving acceptable ratings, and 3 receiving unacceptable ratings.

Overall, the candidates demonstrated comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the important concepts and topics encountered throughout the M. Ed. program of study. The greatest weakness was noted for responses to CEL 618- Elementary Curriculum. Strengths were noted for CEL 621 and CEL 630.


1. Review online syllabi and course content for CEL 618 to determine if comp questions are aligned with course content and requirements.
2. No responses were noted for courses CEL 613 & CEL 617. The courses are no longer taught and it appears that no candidates who took the courses remain in the program. The items were removed from the Comps beginning Spring 2010.


#2 Demonstrate skill in verbal ability adequate for success in a graduate program


A satisfactory writing proficiency score must be submitted during the first 12 hours of coursework in order to receive full admission and complete the program. Candidates may choose one choose of the following assessments:

CAAP – minimum score of 3

GRE Verbal – minimum score of 370

MAT – minimum score of 30

Praxis I Writing (PPST or CBT) – minimum score of 174

NTE (Communication Skills) – minimum score of 653



Campus

Ten candidates were fully admitted to the M.Ed. program. The verbal ability test scores that were verified indicated that 3 candidates had NTE scores that ranged from 653-673, 5 candidates had Praxis writing scores that ranged from 174-183, and 2 candidates had CAAP scores that ranged from 3-4.

All candidates demonstrated acceptable verbal ability upon full admission to the M.Ed .program.
Online

Fifty-three online candidates were fully admitted to the M.Ed. program in 2009. The verbal ability test scores that were verified indicated that 4 candidates had NTE scores that ranged from 653-673, 46 candidates had Praxis writing scores that ranged from 174-185, and 3 candidates had CAAP scores that ranged from 3-4.


All candidates demonstrated acceptable verbal ability upon full admission to the M.Ed. program.


1. None at this time.
2. None at this time.

#3 Demonstrate ability to plan and support planning at both the lower and upper elementary levels using appropriate professional expertise.


1. & 2. In CEL 630, Practicum in Elementary Education, candidates will be required to plan and implement a teaching unit.
3. Sections of the Teacher Work Sample (TWS) will be used as a means to demonstrate candidate ability to plan and support planning. Sections to be used are Contextual Factors, Learning Goals, Assessment Plan, Design for Instruction, Instructional Decision Making, and Design for Instruction in Elementary Education. A distribution of scores will be used to analyze data. (See Appendix B, Scoring Guide/Rubric 2 for the TWS Rubric)







#4 Demonstrate the ability to teach effectively in a field experience/clinical setting




1. & 2. In CEL 630, Practicum in Elementary Education, candidates will be evaluated while teaching a lesson.
3. A rubric and a modified TWS incorporating parts of the STAI will be used to evaluate the candidates’ teaching. (See Appendix A, Instrument 1 for the STAI instrument. See Appendix B, Scoring Guide/Rubric 2 for the TWS.)








#5 Demonstrate the ability to teach effectively in a field experience/clinical setting


1. & 2. CEL 630, Practicum in Elementary Education, pre- and post-assessment data will be used to evaluate the impact of the lesson on student learning and the support of an environment that supports learning.
3. The TWS will be used in CEL 630 to collect the data to show that candidates have an impact on student learning and support an environment that supports learning. (See Appendix B, Scoring Guide/Rubric 2 for the TWS.)








#6 Demonstrate appropriate dispositions for candidates who are working toward the M. Ed. degree in Elementary Education

1 & 2. The graduate version of the Disposition Rating Scale (DRS) will be used by faculty to rate candidates.

3. A distribution of scores will be used to analyze data. (See Appendix A, Instrument 4 for the dispositions scale.)



Campus & Online

Campus candidates (N=11) and online candidates (N=23) who applied for graduation were rated by faculty. All candidates met or exceeding expectations for professional dispositions.

Overall, the candidates demonstrated positive dispositions that reflect professionalism.


1. No changes at this time. The current protocol for flagging candidates who demonstrate unacceptable dispositions will continue to be followed.

2. The procedure for online students will be changed, beginning fall 2010. Candidates will complete a dispositions portfolio that includes a DRS self-assessment accompanied by a self-reflection on each dispositional characteristic.




#7 Demonstrate an understanding of diversity and the ability to teach diverse populations effectively.


1., 2., & 3. Diversity assessments will be carried out in CRD 624, Literacy Instruction in Elementary Education. In CRD 624, data will be collected from a final exam essay question.

Information pertaining to diversity is directly related to Standard II (Equity, Fairness, and Diversity) of the early childhood/generalist area of the NBPTS as well as Standard IV (Respect for Diversity) of the middle childhood/generalist area.



Campus

During CRD 624, campus candidates (N=34) completed an essay item that evaluated their ability to meet accept and meet the diverse needs of students. Sixteen candidates received acceptable ratings, 14 received outstanding ratings, and 3 received marginal ratings. No candidates received unacceptable ratings.

Online

During CRD 624, online candidates (N=19) completed an essay item that evaluated their ability to meet accept and meet the diverse needs of students. Eleven candidates received acceptable ratings and 5 received outstanding ratings. No candidates received marginal or unacceptable ratings.


Most of the campus and online candidates were able to demonstrate their ability to accept and meet the needs of diverse learners during literacy instruction.


1 & 2. Candidates have consistently demonstrated their ability to accept and meet the needs of diverse learners during literacy instruction.




Educational Specialist in Elementary Education Degree Program


TABLE I.C – Student Learning Outcomes


A. Learner Outcome

What should a graduate in the
Educational Specialist in Elementary Education
major know, value, or be able to do at graduation and beyond?

B. Data Collection & Analysis

1. What assessment tools and/or methods will you use to determine achievement of the learning outcome? 2. Describe how the data from these tools and/or methods will be/have been collected.

3.Explain the procedure to analyze the data.

C. Results of Evaluation

What were the findings of the analysis?

D. Use of Evaluation Results

1.List any specific recommendations.

2. Describe changes in curriculum, courses, or procedures that are proposed or were made/ are being made as a result of the program learning outcome assessment process.


# 1 Demonstrate an understanding of the knowledge and skills associated with the content of the Ed. S. degree program in Elementary Education.


1. & 2. A comprehensive examination will be administered each semester to candidates in the final course work of the Educational Specialist degree program.
3. A rubric will be used to evaluate the examinations and scores will be analyzed to assess strengths and weaknesses in the program.

The assessment data are linked to both the National Board For Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) 1 for the middle childhood/generalist (Standard II, knowledge of Content and Curriculum) and the early childhood generalist (Standard V, Knowledge of Integrated Curriculum). These standards relate directly to knowledge/skills elementary teachers need in order to understand what needs to be taught. Assessment data are also linked to Guiding Principle 1 of the Delta State University Conceptual Framework. (See Appendix B, Scoring Guide/Rubric 5 for the scoring rubric.)



Six EdS majors took the comprehensive exam. Five passed the exam and 1 failed. All of the candidates responded to items for CEL 705 and CEL 706, which is a requirement for Comps. Of the 6 responses for CEL 705, 3 received target ratings, 2 received acceptable ratings, and 1 received an unacceptable rating. Of the 6 responses for CEL 706, 3 received target ratings and 3 received acceptable ratings. Candidates had choices between the following courses: CEL 610, CEL 611, CEL 618, CEL 620, CEL 621, CEL 630, & CRD 624. Three candidates responded to CEL 610 with 3 receiving target ratings and 1 receiving an unacceptable rating. Four candidates responded to CEL 618 with 1 receiving a target rating and 3 receiving acceptable ratings. Two candidates responded to CRD 624 with 1 receiving a target rating and 1 receiving an acceptable rating. Five candidates responded to CEL 611 with 1 receiving a target rating, 3 receiving acceptable ratings, and I receiving an unacceptable rating. One candidate responded to CEL 620 and received an acceptable rating. Four candidates responded to CEL 630 with 1 receiving a target rating and 3 receiving acceptable ratings.

Most (83.3%) of the candidates demonstrated comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the important concepts and topics encountered throughout the EdS program of study.


No changes made at this time based on the data. However, program changes resulting in prescribed courses in the Ed. Sp program will require a revision of the Comps. New items will be developed for the major field and related program courses.


#2 Demonstrate skill in verbal ability adequate for success in a graduate program


A satisfactory writing proficiency score must be submitted during the first 12 hours of coursework in order to receive full admission and complete the program. Candidates may choose one choose of the following assessments:

CAAP – minimum score of 3

GRE Verbal – minimum score of 370

MAT – minimum score of 30

Praxis I Writing (PPST or CBT) – minimum score of 174

NTE (Communication Skills) – minimum score of 653




Thirty-nine candidates gained full acceptance in the EdS program. All submitted Praxis Writing scores ranged from 174-183.
All candidates demonstrated acceptable verbal ability.


1 & 2. None at this time.

# 3 Demonstrate the ability to plan and support planning at a level commensurate with the Educational Specialist level of expertise.

1. & 2. In order to show that candidates in the Educational Specialist degree program in Elementary Education can plan and support planning at an advanced level of expertise, candidates in CEL 705, Practicum in Early Childhood Education (K-3) and CEL 706, Practicum in Upper Elementary/Middle School (4 – 8) will plan and teach lessons based on a modified Teacher Work Sample that incorporates a research component for this advanced level of preparation. CEL 705 is taught the first semester of each academic year.

3. These sections of the Teacher Work Sample (TWS) will be used to show the ability to plan and support planning: Contextual Factors, Learning Goals, Assessment Plan, Design for Instruction, Instructional Decision Making, and Design for Instruction in Elementary Education.

The assessment data in this area are related to the NBPTS Standards II (Knowledge of Content and Curriculum) and VI (Meaningful Applications of Knowledge) for the middle childhood/generalist and Standard VI (Multiple Teaching Strategies of Meaningful Learning) for the early childhood generalist. (See Appendix B, Scoring Guide/Rubric 2 for the TWS.)




Candidates in CEL 705 (N=30) demonstrated the ability to accurately represent content (96.7% met the indicator), develop lessons that moved students toward achieving learning goals (96.7% met indicator), and integrate the content (90% met indicator). Most (96.7%) were able to use a variety of instructional activities and use contextual factors to plan effective lessons. Weaknesses were noted in the candidates’ ability to align lessons with learning goals (6.6% partially met or did not meet the indicator). All candidates in CEL 706 (N=14) met all of the indicators for planning.
Though most of the candidates demonstrated the ability to plan effective lessons, weaknesses were noted that involved aligning lessons and learning goals.



1. Revisit course content and experiences that involve aligning lesson activities and instruction with learning goals. These skills will be emphasized in all courses that require lesson planning.
2. None at this time.

# 4 Demonstrate the ability to successfully teach in a field experience/clinical setting.


1. & 2. Candidates in CEL 705 and CEL 706 will teach a lesson that will be videotaped and assessed using a scoring guide.
3. A modification of the TWS incorporating parts of the Student Teacher Assessment Instrument (STAI) will be used to collect data. (See Appendix A, Instrument 1 for the STAI instrument and Appendix B, Scoring Guide/Rubric 2 for the TWS.)


Most candidates in CEL 705 (N= 30) received either outstanding or acceptable ratings in all areas of the STAI. Marginal ratings were greatest for providing a variety of instructional strategies (16.7%), accommodating differences (16.7%), allowing opportunities for problem solving (16.7%), identifying and addressing misconceptions (16.7%), and asking higher-order thinking questions (16.7). All candidates in CEL 706 (N=14) received acceptable ratings in all areas of professional knowledge and skills during clinical practice.
Overall, the candidates demonstrated that they have the content and pedagogical content knowledge to implement effective instruction. Meeting the needs of diverse learners continues to be a challenge for a minority of candidates.


1. Faculty will review course content throughout the program of study in order to identify ways in which to strengthen candidate knowledge and skills in address the needs of a diverse population of students.

# 5 Demonstrate that candidate’s teaching has an impact on student learning and support of an environment that supports learning.



1. & 2. Candidates in CEL 705 and CEL 706 will use student data from the TWS to demonstrate impact on student learning.
3. The Analysis of Student Learning sections of the TWS will be used to collect this data.

This area is directly related to Standard III (Learning Environment) of the middle childhood/generalist standards for the NBPTS. (See Appendix B, Scoring Guide/Rubric 2 for the TWS.)




Most candidates in CEL 705 (N= 30) demonstrated the ability to meaningfully interpret student data and draw appropriate conclusions (96.7% met indicator while 3.3% did not meet indicator). Most (96.7% met indicator) were able to demonstrate evidence of the impact on student learning in terms of number of students who achieved and made progress toward each learning goal. Ninety percent met the indicator demonstrating their ability to clearly present analysis of student data. All candidates in CEL 706 (N=14) met the indicators for meaningfully interpreting student data and drawing appropriate conclusions, demonstrating evidence of the impact on student learning in terms of number of students who achieved and made progress toward each learning goal, and demonstrating their ability to clearly present analysis of student data.
Overall, the candidates demonstrated they were able to positively impact student learning and provide evidence of such impact.


1 & 2. None at this time.

# 6 Demonstrate that candidate teaching reflects appropriate dispositions necessary for effective teaching.

1., 2., & 3. Students in the Ed. S. program in Elementary Education are rated on dispositions using the graduate version of the Dispositions Rating Scale.

The information is filed in the student’s folder for advisement purposes. NBPTS Standard II (Equity, Fairness, and Diversity) of the middle childhood/generalist area is directly related to dispositions. (See Appendix A, Instrument 4 for the Dispositions Rating Scale.)



Candidates (N=6) were rated by faculty upon application to Comps. All candidates (100%) either met or exceeded expectations for dispositions.
The candidates demonstrated positive dispositions that reflect professionalism.


1 & 2. Because the EdS program is now online, candidates will self-rate their dispositions and will submit a Disposition portfolio upon application for the Comps Exam and graduation.




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