Delta state university



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* The following titles are provided for referenced courses.

CSP 546 – Advanced Survey of Exceptional Children

CEL/CUR 611 – Classroom Management and Organization

CEL/CUR 612 – Development, Assessment, and Evaluation

CEL/CSD 614 – Methods of Instruction in Elementary/Secondary Schools

CEL/CUR 650 – Dimensions of Learning/Internship



Master of Education in Special Education Degree Program


TABLE I.E – Student Learning Outcomes


A. Learner Outcome

What should a graduate in the
Master of Education in Special Education
major know, value, or be able to do at graduation and beyond?

B. Data Collection & Analysis

1. What assessment tools and/or methods will you use to determine achievement of the learning outcome? 2. Describe how the data from these tools and/or methods will be/have been collected.

3.Explain the procedure to analyze the data.

C. Results of Evaluation

What were the findings of the analysis?

D. Use of Evaluation Results

1.List any specific recommendations.

2. Describe changes in curriculum, courses, or procedures that are proposed or were made/ are being made as a result of the program learning outcome assessment process.

#1 Demonstrate mastery of the content of the M.Ed. degree program in special education, including, but not limited to history, philosophy, theories, legal and ethical practices, service delivery, curriculum and instruction.


Candidates entering the program may be divided into three categories. One subgroup includes individuals who have completed an undergraduate degree in special education. These candidates have already met the Praxis Specialty Area requirement. The second subgroup includes individuals with undergraduate degrees in other areas of education. These individuals are advised to take the Praxis exam upon completion of 15-18 hours of coursework. The last subgroup members have undergraduate degrees in areas other than education. Some have already passed the special education Praxis exam due to requirements for alternate licensure in Mississippi. Others are full time students and are advised to take the Praxis exam upon completion of 15-18 hours of coursework. The Praxis examination must be passed in order to register for comprehensive examinations.

Candidates will take an essay-type comprehensive examination in the last semester of their program. This may be the semester in which the candidate is taking remaining coursework, or it may be the semester after course completion. Candidates are required to attend at least one comprehensive examination study session before taking comps. These sessions orient the candidates to the format of the exam; provide a study guide with prompts and a copy of the rubric, and suggestions on time management and editing during the test session.

The examination consists of four sets of questions covering: 1) Law and Practices, 2) Development and Characteristics of Learners 3) Individual Learning Differences, and 4) Professional and Ethical Practice. Each set includes two questions and a single set of prompts derived from the CEC standard(s) covered by that set. Candidates are given the prompts and related CEC standards in practice comprehensive exams administered throughout the program and in comps study and orientation sessions. On the exam, the candidates are given the questions and the prompts. Prompts are provided to elicit parallel content regardless of the specific question. The exam is given in two three-hour sessions; each session covers two question sets. Candidates respond to one question from each question set.

3. Comprehensive exams will be graded using a 4-point rubric, which rates both content and writing. Candidates are rated on a) mechanics, b) content breadth, c) content depth; d) standards based content, e) organization, and f) clarity. Three faculty members read and score each candidate’s work. Candidates must score 70% or higher from at least two faculty members. Faculty members meet to discuss the results for each candidate to make the final determination. All decisions are made blind; candidate names are not revealed until the entire group has been processed.

Comprehensive examinations are administered in candidates’ last semester enrolled in the program. (See Appendix B, Scoring Guide/Rubric 6 for the comprehensive examination rubric.)




Program goals are set for a 70% pass rate. This goal was not reached in any semester.
In spring 2009, 13 candidates took the comprehensive exam, with 46% of the candidates passing. In summer 2009, four candidates took the comprehensive exam, with 50% passing. In fall 2009, six candidates took comprehensive exam, with 33% passing; three of the six were taking the exam for the second time.
Included in the candidate set this year were a set of students whose course work was more than three years old; the content of several courses has changed during that time period. Additionally, the set includes four candidates who have taken comps more than once.


1. & 2. Recommended changes based upon this analysis are as follows:

  • Rework comps practice system
  • Develop a formal comps policy including how candidates are cleared to take comps, what actions are taken when a candidate fails comps, and how many times a candidate can retake comps


  • Formalize remedial plans from a range of options specified in the written comps policy

  • Formalize formative comps in CSP 651, 643, 616, and 547.



#2 Demonstrate skills associated with the master’s level in special education in planning and implementing instruction for individuals with exceptional learning needs in a variety of classroom settings.


1. & 2. Undergraduate programs at Delta State University use the STAI (Student Teacher Assessment Instrument) to evaluate student teaching. Because our candidates are enrolled in an initial preparation program, even though it is a graduate program, we use a modified teacher work sample, the Special Education Unit Planner, to give an expanded assessment of planning and implementation of instruction. This is in response to criticism of our accrediting body (CEC) on the overuse of STAI. We will still use the STAI for observation of instruction.

The Special Education Unit Planner has a total of five components which deal with teaching processes identified by research and best practices as fundamental to improving student learning. Each dimension (or teaching process) of this teacher work sample is followed by a standard, the task, a prompt, and a rubric that defines various levels of performance on the standard. The standards and rubrics will be used to evaluate candidate work. The prompts help document the extent to which the candidate has met each standard.


Candidates will be required to plan a comprehensive unit. Before teaching the unit, they will be asked to describe contextual factors; identify learning goals based on state or district content standards; create an assessment plan designed to measure student performance before, during, and after teaching; and plan for instruction. After teaching the unit, candidates will analyze student learning and then reflect upon and evaluate teaching as related to student learning in the Teacher Data Collection Project and Reflection. Candidates enrolled in CSP 643* will complete the assignment without the teaching component. Hypothetical data will be used to address the prompts.

3. A 4-point rubric will be used to score the Special Education Unit Planner. Score distributions are calculated. (See Appendix B, Scoring Guide/Rubric 7 for the Special Education Unit Planner rubric and Appendix B, Scoring Guide/Rubric 8 for the Teacher Data Collection Project and Reflection.)


The ability to plan and implement instruction is assessed in internship and field research classes, which are only offered in spring and fall semesters.
Program goals are set for a 70% pass rate. In spring the goal was reached, with all of the six candidates passing the requirement. In fall, two candidates passed, two candidates did not complete the semester or the assessment due to personal issues, and one candidate was removed from the program during the semester.


1. None at this time.
2. Formative evaluation opportunities are being added to courses early in the program of study in order to prepare candidates for planning and implementing instruction during internship and field research classes.

#3 Demonstrate skills associated with the master’s level in special education in the measurement of student achievement and adjustment of instruction for maximum impact on student achievement.


1. & 2. The Teacher Data Collection and Reflection Project, a revised version of the equivalent section of the Teacher Work Sample is used to evaluate impact on student learning. A 4-point rubric will be used. The rubric contains nine indicators.

3. Score distributions will be calculated. (See Appendix A, Instrument 1 for the STAI and Appendix B, Scoring Guide/Rubric 8 for the Teacher Data Collection and Reflection Project.)



The ability to impact student learning is assessed in internship and field research classes, which are only offered in spring and fall semesters.
Program goals are set for a 70% pass rate. In spring the goal was reached, with all of the six candidates passing the requirement. In fall, two candidates passed, two candidates did not complete the semester or the assessment due to personal issues, and one candidate was removed from the program during the semester.


1. None at this time.
2. Although the candidate pass rate was acceptable, faculty members believe that quality is still an issue. Opportunities for field based formative evaluation are being extended into CSP 686, 640 and 643, courses taken early in the program.


#4 Exhibit dispositions associated with the successful teaching of children and youth with disabilities.


1. Assessments of dispositions and diversity will include a philosophy statement, administration of the graduate version of the Dispositions Rating Scale (self assessment and faculty assessment using the unit’s Dispositions Rating Scale) and a diversity statement.
2. The data will be collected in CSP 547/647*as part of the Special Education Professional Folio
3. Score distribution data will be analyzed to find relative strengths and weaknesses. (See Appendix A, Instrument 4 for the graduate version of the Dispositions Rating Scale. See Appendix B, Scoring Guide/Rubric 9 for the Special Education Professional Folio rubric.)






#5 Demonstrate skills associated with analyzing student data and developing teaching/learning strategies based on the analyses.


1. The Individualized Education Case Study will present candidates with a live case study. They will be given written and live documentation of a student with significant learning, motor, sensory, cognitive, or social needs. They will be asked to gather information about the student and prepare a comprehensive case study.
The case study will contain these five sections: a) student characteristics, b) language skills, c) motor skills, d) social/behavioral skills, and e) inclusion. Each of the sections will present a task and a series of prompts to guide the candidate through the process of responding to the task. Each section will be tied to specific CEC competencies.
2. The case study will be completed in CSP 550*.
3. The case study will be rated with a 4-point rubric. The candidate must score at least a 3 on each indicator. (See Scoring Guide/Rubric 10 for The Individualized Education Case Study)


This assessment is only administered in the summer semester. In summer 2009, 14 candidates completed the assessment, 14 passed for 100%
The program goal is 70%. The goal was met

1. Consider expanding the assessment so that candidates will be given more opportunities to analyze student data.

#6 Demonstrate an understanding of assessments systems in Mississippi.

1. Candidates will prepare the Special Education Assessment Work Sample Folio, which contains an individual assessment case study. Candidates will collect descriptive data, draft an assessment plan, conduct norm-referenced and curriculum-based assessments, describe accommodations and modifications of the assessments, and write an assessment report. Each of the sections presents a task and a series of prompts to guide the candidate through the process of responding to the task. Each section is tied to specific CEC competencies.

2. The folio will be completed in CSP 545*.
3. The case study will be rated with a 4-point rubric. The candidate must score at least a 3 on each indicator. (See Scoring Guide/Rubric 11 for the Special Education Assessment Work Sample Folio rubric.)


This assessment is only administered in the fall semester. In fall 2009, 25 candidates completed the assessment with 100%
The program goal is 70%. The goal was met.


1. & 2. The special faculty has determined that this assessment does not represent well the demands on special education teacher in today’s inclusive settings. The assessment also has some implementation problems with confidentiality and access to school aged children. This assessment will be revised for the fall.

III. Goals


-- For the Current Year
A. Goal # 1: Continue the refinement of the candidate performance assessment systems for all programs in the division for use with NCATE accreditation, as well as for advisement and improvement of courses and programs. This refinement should include the collection of data in TaskStream.
1. Institutional Goal(s) Supported by This Goal:

SP Goal # 1: Increase Student Learning.

QEP Goal #2: Delta State University will enhance student engagement through increased use of technology and web-based communication in classroom activities and assignments.

QEP Goal #4 : Student engagement in free-flowing, multi-directional communication with faculty and other students will increase. Communication related to current performance and its relationship to long-term student achievement and academic career decisions will improve through the increased use of departmental review boards.

2. Evaluation Procedure(s):
Program faculty used the requirements of the appropriate specialized professional associations and NCATE standards to refine program candidate performance assessment systems. Examples include the refinement of the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) assessments to reflect the ACEI standards for candidates in the elementary track and the NCATE requirements published in spring 2010 for candidates in the secondary track, the continued refinement of some assessments in the Special Education Program, and the revision of the grading rubric for the undergraduate Elementary Education Integrated Unit assessment. The graduate Elementary Education Program continued to use National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) to guide refinement of the program’s candidate performance assessment system. At the graduate level, the procedures and scoring rubrics for comprehensive examinations, which are used as assessments of candidate content knowledge, continue to be refined for all programs.

3. Actual Results of Evaluations:

Program faculty used assessment data to identify strengths and needs in courses and in the program as a whole, as well as for accreditation purposes. Program faculty completed Assessment Data Summary and Analysis Reports on all program candidate performance assessments to document the strengths and weaknesses, as well as data-driven decisions resulting from the data analysis. Results of the data analysis and data-driven changes were shared with teacher candidates, College of Education and University faculty, and other stakeholders. The move toward use of TaskStream was slower than anticipated. All programs are ready to implement TaskStream for data collection and analysis in the Fall 2010 Semester.

4. Uses of Evaluation Results:

Program faculty analyzed candidate performance data to use for advisement, as well as to make data-driven changes in courses and the program as a whole. Data-driven changes were documented in meeting minutes, such as those of faculty meetings, curriculum committees, the Teacher Education Council, and the Assessment Committee. Examples of data-driven decisions include the use of candidate feedback and the results of comprehensive examinations to refine the procedures and grading rubrics for all graduate programs. At the undergraduate level, a continuing focus on preparing candidates to implement teaching strategies that are effective with a diverse student population has brought about focus on enhancing field experiences in a variety of settings and on identifying and assisting students who are struggling with content knowledge to develop and implement intervention plans.

B. Goal #2: Increase number of graduates by an average of 2% per year.
1. Institutional Goal(s) Supported by This Goal:
SP Goal #1: Increase student learning.
SP Goal #2: Develop an engaged, diverse, high quality student population.
QEP Goal #4: Student engagement in free-flowing, multi-directional communication with faculty and other students will increase. Communication related to current performance and its relationship to long-term student achievement and academic career decisions will improve through the increased use of departmental review boards.
2. Evaluation Procedure(s):
Faculty members will review data on credit hour production, enrollment, and graduate rates to identify trends. Plans will be developed and implemented to attract, retain, and support undergraduate and graduate teacher candidates.
3. Actual Results of Evaluation:

Across the three years of data, the overall number of graduates fell 6% between AY 2007-08 and 2008-09 and rose by 34% between AY 2008-09 and 2009-10. Table 4 provides a comparison of graduates by major; data indicate the following when comparing the number of graduates between AY 2008-09 and AY 2009-10:

- an increase of 9% for the B.S.E. in Elementary Education Degree Program

- an increase of 32% for the M.Ed. in Elementary Education Degree Program

- an increase of 29% for the Ed.S. in Elementary Education Degree Program

- an increase of 25% for the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) Degree Program

- a decrease of 66% for the M.Ed. in Special Education Program.

The increase in the M.Ed. in Elementary Education Degree Program may be attributed to the increase in the number of students enrolled in the online track as well as the graduation of 28 students in the Tishomingo Cohort. The increase in the Ed.S. in Elementary Education Degree Program may be attributed to the increase in the number of students enrolled in the program since it moved totally online in Spring 2009. Graduation numbers in the MAT Degree Program have been variable over the past four years and will continue to be tracked closely. Although the number of graduates in the M.Ed. in Special Education Degree Program fell in AP 2009-10, the numbers were strong in AP 2007-08 and AY 2008-09; numbers will continue to be tracked closely.
Table 1

Goal

Institutional Goal

Baseline

(AY 2007-08)



Year 1

(08-09)


Year 2

(09-10)


Year 3

(10-11)


Year 4

(11-12)


Year 5

(12-13)

Year 6

(13-14)


Goal #2 – Increase number of graduates by an average of 2% per year

SP 2, 5 (2008-09)

SP 1, 2 (2009-2010)

QEP 4


103

97

146












4. Use of Evaluation Result:


Data were used to identify the effectiveness of recruitment and retention initiatives, and revise initiatives based upon the data analysis. For example, a second Tishomingo Cohort in the M.Ed. in Elementary Education Degree Program is beginning in Summer I 2010. The initiative continues to be funded by the Tri-State Educational Foundation and has been expanded beyond Tishomingo to other northeast Mississippi counties.
C. Goal # 3: The Division of Teacher Education will successfully implement all requirements of the IHL Blue Ribbon Committee for the Redesign of Teacher Education (Continued from 2008-2009).
1. Institutional Goal(s) Supported by This Goal:

SP Goal #1: Enhanced academic programs will ensure that graduates are well prepared for successful careers and ready to contribute to the civic life of their communities. (2008-2009)

SP Goal #1: Increase student learning. (2009-2010)
QEP Goal # 4: Student engagement in free-flowing, multi-directional communication with faculty and other students will increase. Communication related to current performance and its relationship to long-term student achievement and academic career decisions will improve through the increased use of departmental review boards.
2. Evaluation Procedure(s):
Faculty will review course evaluations and candidate performance assessment data to analyze the effectiveness of the curriculum changes implemented during the Fall 2009 Semester. In addition, the results of the spring 2010 Mississippi Department of Education (MDE) Process Review will be used to evaluate compliance with the Redesign requirements.
3. Actual Results of Evaluation:
All standards were met in the spring 2010 MDE Process Review. Course evaluations and candidate performance data indicate the possible need to improve candidate knowledge and skills related to effective teaching strategies for a diverse student population.
4. Uses of Evaluation Results:
Faculty will be meeting to discuss ways to strengthen the current efforts in this area and identify possible new interventions, with particular emphasis on effective use of field experiences to enhance candidate knowledge and skills.

D. Goal # 4: Infuse the eight components of the Healthy Schools curriculum throughout the undergraduate Elementary Education program of study.


1. Institutional Goal(s) supported by this goal:

SP Goal #1: Increase student learning.

SP Goal #5: Improve the quality of life for all constituents.

QEP Goal #4: Student engagement in free-flowing, multi-directional communication with faculty and other students will increase. Communication related to current performance and its relationship to long-term student achievement and academic career decisions will improve through the increased use of departmental review boards.
2. Evaluation Procedure(s):
Faculty will infuse the eight components of the Healthy Schools curriculum in appropriate course syllabi during the Fall 2009 Semester. The components will be implemented within the curriculum of appropriate courses, beginning with the Spring 2010 Semester. The effectiveness of the initiative will be assessed through the results of course evaluations and candidate performance assessments, in addition to the results obtained by evaluators of the College of Education Delta Health Alliance and Blue Cross-Blue Shield grants.
3. Actual Results of Evaluation:

During the Fall 2009 Semester, Ms. Meridith Van Namen, the Healthy Schools Coordinator, worked with the Elementary Education faculty to identify appropriate courses and course activities in the undergraduate program of study into which Healthy Schools components could be infused. The infusion was implemented in the Spring 2010 Semester. Examples include the following:

- Relate the implication of positive and negative aspects of classroom environments to the social/mental health of students (CEL 301.Introduction to Elementary Education)

- Relate mental health/teacher wellness and effective time management strategies for elementary teachers (CEL 310.Instructional Planning in the Elementary School)

- Develop activities to teach phonemic awareness, phonics, and/or word recognition using physical activity or movement

(CEL 314.Early Literacy I)

- Develop and implement a health-related interdisciplinary teaching unit (CEL 318.Principles and Techniques of Teaching

in the Middle Grades)

- Understand the relationship of Response to Intervention, classroom management, and a healthy school environment

(CEL 393. Classroom Management)

4. Uses of Evaluation Results:

Initial changes in courses will be monitored for effectiveness during the 2010-2011 Academic Year.

-- For Coming Year(s)
A. Goal #1: Prepare program reports for submission to specialized professional associations (SPAs) in September 2011. The following programs will submit reports: B.S.E. in Elementary Education, M.Ed. in Special Education, and M.A.T. Degree Programs.
1. Institutional Goal(s) Supported by This Goal:

SP Goal # 1: Increase Student Learning.

QEP Goal #2: Delta State University will enhance student engagement through increased use of technology and web-based communication in classroom activities and assignments.
QEP Goal #4 : Student engagement in free-flowing, multi-directional communication with faculty and other students will increase. Communication related to current performance and its relationship to long-term student achievement and academic career decisions will improve through the increased use of departmental review boards.
COE Goal #1: Quality addresses accreditation, the capacity of the College to sustain and expand programs and services, and the development of a culture of self-reflection and growth resulting in a plan of continuous improvement.
2. Evaluation Procedure(s):
Program coordinators and program faculty will develop and submit SPA reports by September 15, 2011, based on the standards and requirements of their respective SPAs.
3. Expected Results
Programs will submit successful reports that lead to national recognition from their respective SPAs.

4. Anticipated/Intended Uses of Evaluation Results

Program faculty will use the results of the candidate performance assessments linked to SPA standards and addressed in the SPA reports to make data-driven decisions for the improvement of courses and the program. Program faculty will address any areas of concern identified in the SPA report, using this information to improve the program.



  1. Goal #2: Increase the number of graduates by an average of 2% over five years, with the baseline year as AY 2007-08. (refinement

of Goal #2, 2009-2010)
1. Institutional Goal(s) Supported by This Goal:
SP Goal #1: Increase student learning.
SP Goal #2: Develop an engaged, diverse, high quality student population.
QEP Goal #4: Student engagement in free-flowing, multi-directional communication with faculty and other students will increase. Communication related to current performance and its relationship to long-term student achievement and academic career decisions will improve through the increased use of departmental review boards.
COE Goal #3: Recruitment, Enrollment, and Retention addresses the need for a systemic plan for analyzing enrollment patterns, strategic recruitment, and attention to retaining students in programs once enrolled.
2. Evaluation Procedure(s):
Working with Graduate and Admissions/Recruitment Offices, a master plan for recruitment will be developed. The Division advisement system and information from Banner will be used to develop a strategic plan for retention, with pre-registration as a focus/gate-keeper.
3. Expected Results:
Plans for recruitment and retention will be developed and the first stage of implementation will begin during the 2010-2011 Academic Year.
4. Anticipated/Intended Uses of Evaluation Results:
Preliminary data will be analyzed by early fall 2011 to support data-driven decisions related to recruitment and retention.

  1. Goal #3: The following goals are related to the Healthy Schools initiative and will be coordinated by the Healthy Schools


Coordinator: (1) Infusion of the Healthy Schools curriculum in the undergraduate Elementary Education program will be reviewed and refined as needed. (2) Contacts will be made in local elementary and middle schools to support collaborative work related to safe and healthy schools
1. Institutional Goal(s) supported by this goal:

SP Goal #1: Increase student learning.
SP Goal #5: Improve the quality of life for all constituents.
QEP Goal #4: Student engagement in free-flowing, multi-directional communication with faculty and other students will increase. Communication related to current performance and its relationship to long-term student achievement and academic career decisions will improve through the increased use of departmental review boards.
COE Goal #1: Quality addresses accreditation, the capacity of the College to sustain and expand programs and services, and the development of a culture of self-reflection and growth resulting in a plan of continuous improvement.
COE Goal #5: Identity refers to the unique role the College of Education fulfills within the region and beyond. The College of Education seeks to be identified as providing leadership for the region in the promotion of healthy schools and communities.
2. Evaluation Procedure(s):
Continue to review the results of course evaluations and candidate performance assessments, in addition to the results reported by evaluators of the College of Education Delta Health Alliance grant. Maintain documentation of contacts with local schools and resulting collaborative efforts established.
3. Expected Results

Teacher Education graduates will develop the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed to implement K-6 Healthy Schools curriculum and support wellness initiatives in their school and community, meeting goals associated with the College of Education Delta Health Alliance grant. Coordinated efforts with local schools will improve health and wellness for Delta area children and youth.

4. Anticipated/Intended Uses of Evaluation Results:
Data-driven changes will be made to courses and the program. Collaborative efforts with local schools will increase the capacity of the Division and the local schools in providing effective instruction related to health and wellness.


  1. Goal #4: Review the online M.Ed. and Ed.S. in Elementary Education Programs, establishing criteria for rigor, effectiveness ,and

cohesion.
1. Institutional Goal(s) supported by this goal:
SP Goal #1: Increase student learning
QEP #2: Delta State University will enhance student engagement through increased use of technology and web-based

communication in classroom activities and assignments.


COE Goal #1: Quality addresses accreditation, the capacity of the College to sustain and expand programs and services, and the development of a culture of self-reflection and growth resulting in a plan of continuous improvement.
2. Evaluation Procedure(s):
Graduate faculty will review course content, major course assignments, and curricular cohesion and rigor across courses in the

programs. Recommendations will be made by the faculty as to current strengths and weaknesses and procedures and resources

needed to strengthen the programs. A strategic plan will be developed.
3. Expected Results:
A more cohesive curriculum will be developed within and across programs. Standards for rigor and effectiveness will be identified

and plans will be developed and implemented to address weaknesses and strengthen effective practices.


4. Anticipated/Intended Uses of Evaluation Results:

The strategic plan will be implemented. Course evaluations, results of candidate performance assessments, and faculty feedback

will guide the implementation and refinement of the strategic plan.

E. Goal #5: Complete the successful combining of the Divisions of Teacher Education and Rural School Leadership and Research into one Division - the Division of Teacher Education, Leadership, and Research.
1. Institutional Goal(s) supported by this goal:
SP Goal #4: Enhance institutional effectiveness
QEP Goal #4: Student engagement in free-flowing, multi-directional communication with faculty and other students will increase. Communication related to current performance and its relationship to long-term student achievement and academic career decisions will improve through the increased use of departmental review boards.
COE Goal #1: Quality addresses accreditation, the capacity of the College to sustain and expand programs and services, and the development of a culture of self-reflection and growth resulting in a plan of continuous improvement.
2. Evaluation Procedure(s):
A faculty and staff task force will be developed to guide the combining of the academic and support services of the two divisions.

By mid-semester, fall 2010, the task force will make recommendations that will be submitted for comment and discussion to the

full faculty. Based on faculty feedback, a strategic plan will be developed by the end of the Fall 2010 Semester. Initial stages of

the plan will be implemented in the Spring 2011 Semester.


3. Expected Results:

The transition from two divisions to one will be smooth. Strategic decisions will be made early in the process and reviewed as

needed to enhance the productivity of the new division while strengthening the work environment. Documentation will include the

initial recommendations made by the task force and full faculty and the final strategic plan.

4. Anticipate/Intended Uses of Evaluation Results:
Task force and full faculty recommendations will guide the process and will result in an effective plan that will enhance the

productivity of the new division while strengthening the work environment.

IV. Data and information for department:
Brief Description and/or Narrative of programmatic scope:
The Division of Teacher Education houses the following degree programs:


    • Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education - This degree provides initial licensure in grades Kindergarten through 6.

Supplemental endorsements for middle level grades lead to licensure in grades 7-8. The program is available at the Cleveland

campus, with a few courses offered at the Greenville Higher Education Center. In the Spring 2009 Semester a 2+2 Program with

Hinds Community College was begun; most courses in the 2+2 Program are taught as hybrids with a few totally online.


  • Master of Education Degree in Elementary Education – This program is available at the Cleveland campus, the Coahoma County

Higher Education Center, the Greenville Higher Education Center, and online. The purpose of the program is to prepare quality

teachers who can teach at all levels of the elementary school.



  • Educational Specialist Degree in Elementary Education – Beginning with the Spring 2009 Semester, this program has been

totally online. The purpose of the program is to prepare quality elementary teachers who can function effectively and provide

leadership for fellow teachers at both the primary and intermediate levels.


  • Master of Education in Special Education – This program provides initial licensure in Special Education and is available at the


Cleveland campus. The program mission is to train teachers to work with children and youth with mild/moderate disabilities.

  • Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) – The MAT is an alternate-route program designed for promising individuals with non-

education degrees who want to become teachers. It leads to a Master of Arts in Teaching Degree and Mississippi AA licensure.

The program is available at the Cleveland campus, with innovative course delivery methods, including weekend classes, online,

intersession courses, and hybrid courses. The program offers an emphasis in Elementary (Grades 4 – 8) and Secondary

Education (Grades 7 - 12).


Comparative Data (enrollment, CHP, majors, graduation rates, etc):
Table 2: Enrollment by Major for Spring 2007 – Fall 2008

Table 3: Credit Hour Production by Discipline for Spring 2007 – Fall 2008

Table 4: A Comparison of Graduates by Major for AY 2006-2007 – AY 2009-2010
Table 2


ENROLLMENT BY MAJOR




Spring

2007


Spring

2008

Spring

2009


Summer

2007


Summer

2008


Summer

2009


Fall

2007


Fall

2008


Fall

2009





UG

GR

UG

GR

UG

GR

UG

GR

UG

GR

UG

GR

UG

GR

UG

GR

UG

GR

Elementary Education

256

64


262

73

240 

161 

100

45

77

77

78

154

312

60

264

156

290

196

Master of Arts in Teaching

-

7

-

10

-

11

-

21

-

22

-

20

-


13

-

12

-

9

Special Education

14

68

4

72

-

62

4

75

3

46

-

46

5

75

1

61

-

76

Total

270

139

266

155

240

261

104


117

80

145

78

220

317

148

265

229

290

281

The data displayed in Table 2 indicate that enrollment in the undergraduate Elementary Education Program has decreased during the spring and summer sessions, but increased from fall 2008 to fall 2009. Enrollment in Elementary Education graduate programs has increased significantly. Master of Arts in Teaching enrollment has increased slightly from spring 2007 to spring 2009, while enrollment in the summer and fall sessions has decreased. Special Education enrollment in the undergraduate endorsement program has decreased; enrollment in spring and summer sessions has decreased, while enrollment in fall has increased.


Table 3

CREDIT HOUR PRODUCTION BY DISCIPLINE





Spring

2007


Spring

2008


Spring

2009


Summer

2007


Summer

2008


Summer 2009

Fall

2007


Fall

2008


Fall

2009





UG

GR

UG

GR

UG

GR

UG

GR

UG

GR

UG

GR

UG

GR

UG


GR

UG

GR

CEL

1059

201

1116

153

1119

288

204

276

132

474

132

822

1266

213

1140

765

1293

762

CML

72

21


99

36

60

30

21

-

36

-

30

-

69

33

66

6

60

24

CRD

318

75

150

78

183

66

192

90

90

224

84

216

351

-

336


-

297

84

CSP

546

297

519

303

453

261

261

321

225

270

198

330

441

288

402

315

459

357

CSD

-

-


-

-

-

-




27

-

33

-

24

-

27

-

24

-

18

CUR

435

153

374

291

262

348

12

477

-

291

-

366

466

183


517

105

579

105

Total

2430

747

2258

861

2077

993

690

1191

483

1302

444

1758

2593

744

2461

1215

2688

1350




Undergraduate Elementary Education

For the spring semesters, the data displayed in Table 3 indicate an increase in credit hour production (CHP) for the CEL prefix from spring 2007 to spring 2009, a decrease for the CUR (shared with Secondary Education), variable CHP in the CML and CRD prefixes (Elementary Education), and a decrease in the Special Education endorsement courses. For the summer terms, the data indicate a decrease in all prefixes. For the fall semesters, the data indicate variable CHP for the CEL prefix (Elementary Education) with an increase between fall 2008 and fall 2009, a decrease in the CRD prefix, and an increase in the CUR prefix (shared with Secondary Education).


Graduate Elementary Education (M. Ed. and Ed.S.)

For the spring semesters, the data displayed in Table 3 indicate variable CHP in the CEL (shared with MAT) prefix and a decrease in the CRD prefix. For the summer terms, the data indicate a significant increase from 2007 to 2009 for the CEL (shared with MAT) and CRD prefixes. For the fall semesters, the data indicate a significant increase between 2007 and 2008 for the CEL (shared with MAT) prefix and a maintained increase in 2009; while no CRD prefixes were offered in fall 2007 and 2008, a CHP of 84 was earned in fall 2009.


Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT)

The MAT Program shares the CEL prefix; candidates in the MAT Elementary track take courses with this prefix. The graduate CML prefix is found only in the MAT Elementary track; CHP in this prefix has been variable. The CSD prefix is found only in the MAT Secondary track; CHP in the prefix has been variable.

Special Education M.Ed. Program

For the spring and summer semesters, the data indicate that CHP has been variable. CHP has risen across the three fall semesters.

CUR Prefix (Master’s Core Course)

CHP increased significantly across the spring semester, was variable in summer, and fell between fall 2007 and 2008 but was maintained between 2008 and 2009.


Table 4

A COMPARISON OF GRADUATES BY MAJOR




2006-2007

2007-2008

2008-2009

2009-2010

BSE Elementary Education

39

51

41

44

M.Ed. Elementary Education

20

22

24

76

Ed.S. Elementary Education

2

7

2

7

Master of Arts in Teaching


17

7

9

12

BSE Special Education

3

2

(Program has closed)

(Program has closed)

M.Ed. Special Education

6

14

21

7

Totals

87

103

97

146

The data displayed in Table 4 indicate a significant increase in the overall the number of graduates in 2009-2010. Reviewing the data by program indicates variable numbers in the BSE in Elementary Education with an increase between 2008-2009 and 2009-20010, an increase in the M.Ed. in Elementary Education (particularly significant in 2009-2010), variable numbers in the Ed.S. in Elementary Education with a significant increase between 2008-2009 and 2009-2010, variable numbers in the Master of Arts in Teaching with an increase between 2008-2009 and 2009-2010, and variable numbers in the M.Ed. in Special Education, with a significant decrease in 2009-2010.


Grants, Contracts, Partnerships, Other Accomplishments:


  • The Literacy Enhancement Clinic, funded by a Delta Health Alliance grant (over $129,000 for the 2009-2010 year) provided clinical experiences and professional development opportunities for teacher candidates and diagnostic and remedial assistance to 43 K-12 students through the use of health-related nonfiction texts. Dr. Corlis Snow coordinates the Literacy Enhancement Clinic program.

  • The Literacy Across the Curriculum: Institute for Teachers in Grades 6 - 12, funded by a $76,700 IHL grant, provided training for Delta area teachers in the incorporation of literacy skills in the content areas. Dr. Levenia Barnes is the director of the Institute.

  • The Delta Connection, a partnership with the Elementary Education Program at Blue Mountain College, provides an exchange of undergraduate elementary education candidates for the purpose of team-teaching literacy lessons to diverse elementary students at Bell Elementary in Boyle, MS, and New Albany Elementary in New Albany, MS. Dr. Cheryl Cummins and Mrs. Anjanette Powers coordinate this partnership.

  • The undergraduate Elementary Education Program partners with the administration and faculty at Bell Elementary School in Boyle, MS, to teach CRD 326 Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Difficulties on site at Bell Elementary. Dr. Cheryl Cummins and Mrs. Anjanette Powers coordinate this partnership.
  • The Delta State University/Tishomingo County School District Partnership received a $180,000 grant from the Tri-State Educational Foundation to assist in funding tuition for 28 Tishomingo County School District teachers to receive a Master of Education in Elementary Education Degree from Delta State University. The 28 members of the first cohort graduated in December 2009. Courses for the second cohort began in the Summer I 2010 Term. Dr. Jenetta Waddell coordinates this partnership; 20 scholarships have been funded by the Tri-State Educational Foundation.


  • The DSU/HCC Partnership Elementary Education Partnership is a 2+2 partnership between the Hinds Community College and the undergraduate Elementary Education Program. The program began in the Spring 2009 Semester and provides graduates of Hinds Community College and other residents of Hinds and surrounding counties the opportunity to complete a Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education Degree from Delta State University. Ms. Amanda Dickerson and Dr. Jenetta Waddell coordinate this partnership.

  • Faculty Development Awards were received by Dr. Corlis Snow, Dr. Dianne Thomas, Dr. Maud Kuykendall, Dr. Vicki Hartley, Ms. Elaine Lambert, Sondra Pedersen, and Dr. Jenetta Waddell.

  • The undergraduate Elementary Education Program received the Early Educators Grant funded through the Mississippi Center for

Education Innovation. The grant provides 30 Touch iPods and a MacBook for use in literacy courses. Dr. Dianne Thomas is

coordinating the project.



  • A Teacher-in-Residence Program was implemented in CEL 314. Early Literacy I. Funded through the Mississippi Center for

Education Innovation, the program funded a retired teacher trained through the Barksdale Reading Institute to team teach with Dr. Dianne Thomas.
Curriculum, Program Review and Development, Program Support:

  • In response to the IHL Blue Ribbon Committee for the Redesign of Teacher Preparation initiative, plans for the redesign of the undergraduate Elementary and Secondary Education Programs began in the Fall 2009 Semester. The delivery format for CEL 393 and CUR 393 was changed and the second - semester Junior and first - semester Senior courses were blocked to provide time for a variety of integrated field experiences. The student teacher internship semester was lengthened to include a full P-12 semester.


  • The Delta State University/Hinds Community College 2+2 in Elementary Education Degree Program successfully completed the first year for implementation, with the first- and second-semester of the Junior year implemented via online and hybrid courses. Spring 2010 enrollment was approximately 25 students.

  • A new course was added to the Elementary Education Educational Specialist Program: CEL 712/812. Leadership Roles in Elementary Education is being taught during the Summer I and II 2010 Terms.



Economic Development initiatives and/or impact:
Faculty Service to Area Schools and Educators

The division provided ongoing professional development opportunities to area school district teachers and administrators. These focused on best practices for inclusive classrooms, including positive behavior management, managing challenging behavior, and the referral to placement process; cooperative learning; and differentiated instruction. Faculty also hosted events, such as reading fairs, and served as judges for events. These were done at nominal or no cost to area schools and school districts.


The online Master of Elementary Education Degree Program continues to draw new students, as does the online Educational Specialist in Elementary Education Degree Program. The Delta State University/Hinds Community College 2+2 in Elementary Education Degree Program completed the first year of implementation with approximately 25 students in the program. These programs provide a convenient service delivery model, while maintaining academic rigor.

Faculty Service to the Community

Service to the immediate community continues through the Literacy Enhancement Clinic, which is funded by a Delta Health Alliance grant. The Clinic provided clinical experiences and professional development opportunities for teacher candidates and diagnostic and remedial assistance to 43 K-12 students, using health-related nonfiction text. Services were provided to the K-12 students free-of-charge. Dr. Corlis Snow, the Clinic Coordinator, provided technical assistance training on using informational text for reading instruction to community workers.

One-Year Plan (July 1, 2009 – June 30, 2010)

The Division continued efforts to maintain the quality of the graduate and undergraduate programs, to provide professional development opportunities to area school district teachers and administrators, and to provide services to the community through the Literacy Enhancement Clinic. In addition, a Healthy Schools Coordinator was employed with DHA funds. The Coordinator worked with undergraduate Elementary Education and Master of Education in Educational Administration and Supervision faculty to infuse Healthy School components into their programs of study and developed a resource room of materials for check-out by undergraduate Elementary Education teacher candidates.


Two-Year Plan (July 1, 2010 - June 30, 2011)

Continue to refine efforts from Year 1. In addition, the Healthy Schools Coordinator will work with the Special Education faculty and the instructor of the secondary education introductory course to infuse Healthy School components into these courses. The Healthy Schools Coordinator will work with local schools on Healthy and Safe School initiatives.

Five-Year Plan (July 1, 2009 – June 30, 2014)

The long-term plan includes continuing to provide quality graduate and undergraduate programs, as well as providing professional development for educators and community services through the Literacy Enhancement Clinic. Division faculty also plan to investigate the possibility of establishing long-term partnerships with area school districts to train teacher leaders and provide degree programs at the Greenville Higher Education Center and Mississippi Delta Community College. The Healthy Schools Coordinator will work with faculty to infuse Healthy School components into programs of study and will work with local schools on Healthy and Safe School initiatives.

Diversity Compliance Initiatives and Progress:


  1. Describe the special efforts made in 2008-2009 to employ, train, and promote members of “other races.”* (The term “other race” is defined as indicated within the footnote below.)

A racial minority faculty member is the Coordinator of the graduate Elementary Education Program. Two minority work-study students and two minority graduate assistants were employed to assist faculty in the Division.




  1. Describe faculty exchange arrangement between “other race” institutions and indicate the number of faculty members involved.

None



  1. Describe the special efforts made to assist incumbent “other race” personnel to upgrade credentials for promotions to higher ranked positions. Indicate the number of employees involved.

None



  1. Identify distinguished professorships of “other race” personnel brought to the campus in 2008-2009.

None



  1. Describe the cooperative programs involving both faculty and students between “other race” institutions and indicate the number of persons involved.

None



  1. Identify new programs approved in 2008-2009 which will have potential of attracting “other race” students and faculty members.

The Masters of Arts in Teaching Degree Program has attracted “other race” students from across the Delta region. The online Master’s and Educational Specialist Degree Programs have attracted “other race” students from across the Delta region, the State of Mississippi, and adjoining states.

7. Identify and describe efforts and accomplishments in strengthening existing programs and thereby attracting “other race” students and faculty members.

The Division had alternative course offerings during the past academic year through intersession courses, online courses, video-conferenced courses, and institutes in an effort to accommodate nontraditional students, working students, or those with other encumbrances that might make traditional course offerings difficult to access. The online Master’s in Elementary Education Degree Program and the online Educational Specialist Degree Program have grown significantly in the past year.
* Since the majority of Delta State University’s faculty, staff and students are classified as “White,” the term “other race,” as used above, is to be defined as including those individuals classified by the U.S. Census Bureau as American Indian, Alaskan Native, Asian, Black or African American, Native Hawaiian, or other Pacific Islander.
Committees reporting to unit:
The Chair of the Division of Teacher Education is also chair of the Teacher Education Council (TEC). The TEC is the policy-making body for all Teacher Preparation Programs at Delta State University. Membership is made up of representatives from the Teacher Preparation Programs, P-12 teachers and administrators, community college faculty, community leaders and P- 12 parents, and undergraduate and graduate teacher education candidates. Committee records are archived in the Office of the Chair of the Division of Teacher Education and on the College of Education NCATE shared drive.

The Division of Teacher Education Curriculum Committee is made up of the Chair of the Division of Teacher Education, who is chair of the committee; the Program Coordinators of the Elementary Education, Special Education, and MAT Programs; undergraduate and graduate teacher education candidates, and P-12 representatives. The committee reviews and approves all curriculum changes made to courses in the Division. Committee records are archived in the Office of the Chair of the Division of Teacher Education and on the College of Education NCATE shared drive.

The Assessment Committee for the unit is currently chaired by Chair of the Division of Teacher Education. This committee guides the development and refinement of candidate performance assessments and the Unit Assessment System used to collect, analyze, and disseminate data on candidate performance. Committee records are archived in the Office of the Chair of the Division of Teacher Education and on the College of Education NCATE shared drive.


  1. Personnel:


Faculty, 2009-2010

Dr. Cheryl Cummins, Elementary Education (part time)

Dr. Levenia Maxwell-Barnes, Elementary Education

Dr. Joe Garrison, Elementary Education

Dr. Sandy Rakes Pederson, Elementary Education

Dr. Corlis Snow, Graduate Elementary Education Program Coordinator

Dr. Dianne Thomas, Undergraduate Elementary Education Program Coordinator (fall semester)

Mrs. Anjanette Powers, Elementary Education

Dr. Vicki Hartley, Special Education Program Coordinator

Dr. Maud Kuykendall, Special Education

Ms. Elaine Lambert, Special Education

Dr. Angela Bridges, Secondary Education and MAT Program Coordinator



Administrator, 2009 - 2010

Dr. Jenetta Waddell


Staff, 2009-2010

Ms. Camesha Benson, Senior Secretary for the Division (July - February)

Ms. Annie Garcia, Senior Secretary for the Division (February - June)

Mrs. Merideth Van Namen, Healthy Schools Coordinator (teaches two courses each semester)


Summary:

10 full-time faculty

2 part-time faculty

1 administrator

1 staff, senior secretary

1 staff, Healthy Schools Coordinator


Table 5

Adjunct Faculty


Spring 2009

Summer 2009

Fall 2009

1. Ms. Susan Berryhill

1. Dr. Gerry Sultan

1. Ms. Amanda Dickerson

2. Dr. E. E. Caston (2 courses)

2. Dr. Timothy Watkins (4 courses)

2. Dr. Gerry Sultan (2 sections)

3. Ms. Sharon Spragins

3. Dr. James Smith (2 courses)

3. Dr. James Smith

4. Dr. Debra Fioranelli

4. Dr. Angela Bridges (3 courses)

4. Dr. James Nicholson

5. Ms. Beverly Hardy

5. Ms. Diana Hicks

5. Ms. Sharon Spragins (2 sections)

6. Dr. Gerry Sultan

6. Dr. Carole White (2 courses)

6. Dr. Carole White

7. Dr. Jimmy Smith

7. Dr. Debra Fioranelli

7. Dr. Timothy Watkins


8. Dr. Michael McNeece

8. Ms. Beverly Hardy

8. Dr. Roma Morris

9. Ms. Elizabeth Melton

9. Ms. Karen Mayers

9. Dr. Bob Fuller (2 sections)

10. Dr. Timothy Watkins

10. Ms. Merideth Van Namen (2 courses)

10. Dr. Rhonda Moore-Jackson

11. Ms. Sonya Swafford

11. Dr. Roma Morris (2 courses)

11. Ms. Beverly Hardy

12. Dr. Carole White

12. Ms. Tiffanie Russell

12. Dr. Debra Fioranelli




13. Dr. Patricia Britt

13. Ms. Elizabeth Melton (2 sections)







14. Ms. Lee Alyward







15. Dr. Michael McNeece







16. Ms. Tiffanie Russell





17. Ms. Sonya Swafford



Noteworthy activities and accomplishments:
Professional Growth and Development
Faculty attended the following training and informational sessions related to teaching practices:


  • A to Z Early Childhood Conference, Delta State University, Cleveland, MS (Pedersen, Powers, Thomas)

  • American Conference on Rural Special Education, Denver, CO (Hartley, Lambert)

  • Association of Teacher Educators, Dallas, TX, (Snow, Cummins)

  • Catalysts for Change: Understanding Diversity at Delta State University (Kuykendall)

  • Connecting Teaching and Student Learning, Portland, OR (Cummins, Waddell)

  • Delta State University F.E. Woodall Spring Conference for Helping Professions (Lambert, Hartley, Kuykendall, one Special Education teacher candidate)

  • Delta State University Research and Scholarship Symposium (Kuykendall, Lambert, Waddell, six Special Education teacher candidates)

  • Fountas and Pinnell Leveled Literacy Intervention Awareness Event (Powers)

  • International Reading Association conference, Phoenix, AS (Powers, Barnes, Snow, two graduate candidates)

  • Kappa Delta Pi Convocation, Orlando, FL (Waddell)

  • Mid South Eduational Research Association, Baton Rouge, LA (Kuykendall)

  • Mississippi Association for Developmental Education (Barnes, Powers, Van Namen, Hartley)

  • Mississippi Association for Middle Level Education conference, Vicksburg, MS (Barnes, Powers, Waddell)

  • Mississippi Early Childhood Association, Biloxi, MS (Thomas, three undergraduate Elementary Education teacher candidates)
  • Mississippi Geographic Alliance Pre-Service Conference, Tupelo, MS (Pedersen and 30 undergraduate Elementary Education teacher candidates)


  • Mississippi Reading Association, Biloxi, MS (Snow, two graduate candidates)

  • Visited Emporia State University, Kansas, for College of Education Redesign Committee (Cummins, Powers, Thomas)

Scholarship


Division faculty completed four publications and 17 presentations during the 2009 calendar year.
Publications
Kuykendall, M., Hartley, V., & Lambert, E. (2009). An action research study of teacher candidate responses on culturally responsive teaching. Proceedings of the Mid South Educational Research Association, 64. Retrieved from http://msera.org/2009/proceed09.htm .
Thomas, D. H. (in press). Frogs. In Southern Early Childhood Association (Ed.), What’s new in children’s books? 2009 Edition. Little Rock: Author.
Thomas , D. H. (2009). Henry the Impatient Heron In Southern Early Childhood Association (Ed.), What’s new in children’s books? 2009 Edition. Little Rock: Author.
Thomas, D. H. (2009, August/September). School-year treasure. Mailbox Magazine, Grade 1.
Presentations at Professional Meetings
Barnes, L., & Powers, A. (2009, January). Stepping stones to content literacy. Presentation at the annual meeting of the Mississippi Association for Middle Level Education (MAMLE), Vicksburg, MS.
Barnes, L., Powers, A., & Van Namen, M. (2009, November). Content area reading strategies. Presentation at the annual meeting of the Mississippi Association for Developmental Education, Jackson, MS.

Bingham, V., Clark, G., Kuykendall, M., et al. (2009, March). Pursuing diversity awareness. Panel discussion at the 5th annual Delta Research and Scholarship Symposium, Delta State University, Cleveland, MS.

Griffin, L., Cummins, C., Snow, C., et al. (2009, February). A healthy schools initiative: Answering the call through teacher and leadership preparation. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association of Teacher Educators, Dallas, TX.
Griffin, L., & Waddell, J.R. (2009, October). Sustaining institutional growth through a culture of accountability. Paper

presentation at the National Evaluation Institute CREATE Conference, Louisville, KY.


Hartley, V. J. (2009, November). Developing multi-dimensional rubrics for evaluation and feedback on intensive writing. Presentation at the Mississippi Association for Developmental Education Annual State Conference, Jackson, MS.
Hartley, V. J., & Lambert, E. (2009, April). Positive behavior intervention techniques and reward systems for children and adolescents in small group settings. Presentation at the 28th Annual F. E. Woodall Spring Conference for Helping Professions, Cleveland, MS.
Hartley, V. J., Lambert, E., & Kuykendall, M. (2009, March). Will it go round in circles? The cyclical nature of program assessment and intensive writing. Presentation at the American Council on Rural Special Education, Denver, CO.
Kuykendall, M. & Lambert, E. (2009, April). Respecting differences: The special education interview project. Poster presentation at the 5th Annual Delta Research and Scholarship Symposium, Delta State University, Cleveland, MS.
Kuykendall, M. & Binder, P. (2009, April). Culturally sensitive planning for teachers and others in the helping professions. Presented at the 27th annual Delta State University. F.E. Woodall Spring Conference for Helping Professions, Cleveland, MS.

Kuykendall, M., Hartley, V., & Lambert, E. (2009, November). An action research study of teacher candidate responses on culturally responsive teaching. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Mid South Educational Research Association, Baton Rouge, LA.

Lambert, E., Hartley, V. J., & Kuykendall, M. (2009, March). Is spaghetti a vegetable? Diversity in the stories we tell. Presentation at the American Council of Rural Special Education, Denver, CO.
Pedersen, S. R., Powers, A., & Thomas, D. (2009). Sensory sensations. Presentation 3rd Annual A to Z Early Childhood Conference, Delta State University, Cleveland, MS.
Ratliff , L. & Lambert, E. (2009, March). Online recruitment of highly qualified teachers in the Mississippi Delta. Presentation at the

American Council of Rural Special Education, Denver, CO.


Snow, C., Claypool, L., & Berryhill, S., (2009, December). Building health literacy while remediating reading difficulties. Presentation at the annual meeting of the Mississippi Reading Association, Biloxi, MS.
Snow, C., Claypool, L., & Berryhill, S., (2009, May). The impact of the use of information text for the remediation of reading difficulties. Presentation at the annual convention of the International Reading Association, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Waddell, J. R., & Griffin, L. L. (2009, October). Connecting the generations through oral history: A project for middle-level

students. Presented at the Kappa Delta Pi Convocation, Orlando, FL.



Service and Collaboration


  1. American Council for Rural Special Education Board of Directors Secretary (Hartley)

  1. American Council for Rural Special Education Local Planning Committee for 2010 Conference (Hartley, Lambert, Kuykendall)

  2. American Council for Rural Special Education Silent Auction Committee for 2010 Conference (Hartley)
  3. Cleveland-Bolivar County Young Leaders Network Committee, Cleveland-Bolivar County Chamber of Commerce (Powers)


  4. Cleveland Career Development and Technology Center Advisory/Craft Committee (Powers)

  5. Cleveland Neighborhood Children’s Program board members (Pedersen, Lambert)

  6. Crosstie Arts and Crafts Festival, Cleveland, MS, chair of Volunteer Committee (Powers)

  7. Delta Reading Council, Delta State University, advisor (Pedersen)

  8. Delta State Wesley Foundation, Member, Board of Directors (Waddell)

  9. Dissertation committee chair (Waddell, Kuykendall, Hartley, Snow, Pedersen, Garrison)

  10. Dissertation committee member (Waddell, Snow, Pedersen, Garrison)
  11. Faculty Senate


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