Describe the importance of a day of mourning

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Questions for discussion

D
Episode 2

24th February 2009
ay of mourning


  1. Describe the importance of a day of mourning.

  2. Where did the idea for a day of mourning start?

  3. How is it like a funeral?

  4. How have some children been seeking support?

  5. Why do you think it’s important they get support?

  6. Describe the different emotions of people affected by the fires.

  7. How have some children been expressing their feelings?

  8. What have students been doing to get back into a routine?

  9. Why do you think this is important?

  10. What do you understand more clearly about dealing with loss after watching the BtN story?

Send a message or tell us what you think on the BtN Guestbook.

Stimulus package



  1. Briefly explain the BtN story to another student.

  2. What is the stimulus package?

  3. What is the Government hoping it will do?

  4. What is a recession?

  5. What does the Government want people to do with the money they are given?

  6. Who will benefit from the stimulus package?
  7. How will schools be better off with extra funding?


  8. Outline the reasons why some people are opposed to the package?

  9. Do you agree or disagree with the stimulus package? Give reasons for your answer.

  10. What else do you think could be done to stimulate the economy?

Create a plus, minus and interesting chart about the Government’s stimulus package.

Shark attack



  1. In your own words, describe what happened to Hannah Mighall.

  2. What sort of shark attacked Hannah?

  3. Describe what Hannah’s cousin did.

  4. What do experts say about shark attacks in Australia this summer?

  5. What is happening to the shark population and why?

  6. What species’ of sharks are increasing in numbers and why?

  7. What did Hannah want to happen to the shark?

  8. Do you think the dangers associated with sharks are exaggerated? Explain your answer.

  9. Has your thinking about sharks changed since watching the BtN story? Explain your answer.

  10. What do you think should happen next?

`Should sharks be culled?’ Vote in the online poll.
Test your knowledge in the online quiz.

E

ast Timor volunteers



  1. In your own words, describe what a group of West Australian students did when they finished school?

  2. Why did they choose to become volunteers?

  3. Where is East Timor in relation to Australia?

  4. What has happened in East Timor in the last 6 years?

  5. Why do you think countries like East Timor need support from other countries?

  6. What role did the school leavers play in East Timor?

  7. How much money did the volunteers raise for the project?

  8. Choose three adjectives to describe volunteers.
  9. What do you understand more clearly about volunteers since watching the BtN story?


  10. How did this story make you feel?

Research an organisation that relies on volunteers for work that it does. Identify the different roles the volunteers have within the organisation.

K

ids Olympics



  1. In your own words, describe the aim of the Australian Youth Olympic Festival.

  2. What age group competes in the Youth Olympics?

  3. How many different countries competed?

  4. Describe the experience for the young people competing.

  5. Where did the young athletes stay and compete?

  6. How does it prepare young people for the `real’ Olympics?

  7. How did some Olympians help out during the Youth Olympics?

  8. Why do you think it was important for the athletes to take part in drug education and testing?

  9. What advice did Matthew Mitcham offer the young athletes?

  10. If you could send a message to a young athlete, what would it be?

Go to the Australian Youth Olympic Festival website http://ayof09.olympics.com.au/ and summarise a news story. Present your summary to another student.

Volunteering

I
Episode 2

24th february 2009



Learning Area

Society and Environment



Key learning

Students will deepen their understanding of the role of volunteers in the community.

Students may find useful information about volunteering on their school’s website.

n Western Australia, a group of school leavers decided to celebrate the end of their schooling in a very different way.

Focus Questions




  1. In your own words, describe what a group of West Australian students did when they finished school?

  2. Why did they choose to become volunteers?

  3. Where is East Timor in relation to Australia?

  4. What has happened in East Timor in the last 6 years?

  5. Why do you think countries like East Timor need support from other countries?

  6. What role did the school leavers play in East Timor?

  7. How much money did the volunteers raise for the project?

  8. Choose three adjectives to describe volunteers.

  9. What do you understand more clearly about volunteers since watching the BtN story?

  10. How did this story make you feel?

More about volunteers

Students will deepen their understanding of what it means to be a volunteer and the role of volunteers in the community. Begin with a class brainstorm to establish what students already understand about volunteers and volunteering. Record responses to key questions raised in the discussion as a mind or concept map. Some key questions include:



  • What does being a volunteer mean?

  • Why do people become volunteers?

  • What qualities and values do volunteers need to have?

  • How do people become volunteers?

  • What personal experiences do students have of volunteers or volunteering?

  • Who does volunteering benefit in the community?

To gain an insight into the sort of work volunteers do and why they choose to do it, students will interview a volunteer working in their school or local community. In groups of 3-4 students, ask students to brainstorm the volunteers working within their school or local community. Students then need to organise to interview a willing volunteer. Interview questions can be based on key questions discussed earlier in class. Some additional questions could include:


  • How and why did you become a volunteer?

  • What skills are needed to carry out the volunteer work?

  • What do you gain personally and professionally from volunteering?

Students can share their responses with students from other classes.

Further investigation

Research an organisation that relies on volunteers for work that it does. Identify the different roles the volunteers have within the organisation.

8 Related Research Links

Stateline WA – The Timor Leavers
http://www.abc.net.au/stateline/wa/content/2006/s2440611.htm
Bank of IDEAS – Official website
http://www.bankofideas.com.au/about_frames.html
Volunteering Australia – What is volunteering?
http://www.volunteeringaustralia.org/html/s02_article/article_view.asp?id=1954&nav_cat_id=221&nav_top_id=50
Stimulus package

T


Episode 2

24th february 2009



Learning Area

Society and Environment



Key learning

Students will deepen their understanding of the Government’s stimulus package and what community perceptions are of the package.

Students can video their interviews to create a short film to present to class
he Government has announced it’s going to give nearly 10 million Australians some extra money to help stimulate the economy.

Focus Questions





  1. Briefly explain the BtN story to another student.
  2. What is the stimulus package?


  3. What is the Government hoping it will do?

  4. What is a recession?

  5. What does the Government want people to do with the money they are given?

  6. Who will benefit from the stimulus package?

  7. How will schools be better off with extra funding?

  8. Outline the reasons why some people are opposed to the package?

  9. Do you agree or disagree with the stimulus package? Give reasons for your answer.

  10. What else do you think could be done to stimulate the economy?

Will be economy be stimulated?

Students will investigate community perceptions and understandings of the Government’s stimulus package. Watch the BtN story again and brainstorm with students what the aim of the stimulus package is. Clarify their understanding of the global economic crisis. Watching the BtN stories about the credit crisis http://www.abc.net.au/news/btn/story/s2387803.htm and the recession http://www.abc.net.au/news/btn/story/s2338962.htm will support students with their understanding of the concept.

Students will be interviewing people about how effective they think the stimulus package will be. Working in pairs, ask students to generate some key questions to ask. They will also need to identify a range of people to interview. Some key questions include:


  • Do you think the stimulus package will help Australia’s economy? Why?

  • Is the package fair? Are there people missing out who should be receiving it? If so, who?

  • Do you think there are better ways to stimulate the economy? How?

Students need to present the interview responses to the rest of the class.

Suggested formats include:



  • PowerPoint presentation

  • Short film/animation

  • Oral presentation

Reflection

How has the investigation changed your thinking about the stimulus package?

8 Related Research Links

ABC News – Initial praise for Govt stimulus package
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/02/03/2481129.htm
ABC News – Treasury chief backs timing of stimulus package
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/02/05/2483718.htm
ABC News – Stimulus package dismissed as `worse than useless’
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/02/05/2483688.htm
ABC Radio Australia News – Australian stimulus package gets approval
http://www.radioaustralianews.net.au/stories/200902/2490618.htm?desktop
ABC News – Country schools miss out in stimulus package: Nationals
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/02/04/2482135.htm
SBS World News – Stimulus package gets thumbs up
http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/1007545/Stimulus-package-gets-thumbs-up
BtN: Episode 2 Transcripts 24/02/08

O
n this week's Behind the News:





  • the nation stops to remember the Victorian bushfires

  • the teenage girl who survived a shark attack

  • and why is a 'kids Olympics' being held


Hi I'm Nathan Bazley welcome to Behind the News.

Also on the show today we meet a group of kids choosing a very different way to celebrate schoolies week.

Those items later but first to our top story:

Day of Mourning

Reporter: Sarah Larsen

INTRO: The country is still trying to come to terms with the Victorian bushfire disaster.



Police have now worked out that more than 200 people have been killed ~ thousands of others have lost their homes.

An enormous amount of help is flowing into the area and on Sunday a special service was held as a show of support. Here's Sarah.

SARAH LARSEN, REPORTER: All sorts of people gathered together on Sunday. There were survivors, fire-fighters, royalty and politicians but they all felt the same way.

JOHN BRUMBY, VICTORIAN PREMIER: These fires have united us all in grief, they have united us all in our resolve and they have united us all in the task of rebuilding.

Services were also held in the fire zone and in other states and while it was a day of sadness, it was also a time to come together.

KEVIN RUDD, PRIME MINISTER: For on Black Saturday what we saw at work was the worst of nature but the best of humanity.

Sunday was an official day of mourning. It's like a funeral; a time for the whole country to take in what's happened and a reminder that they're not alone in feeling sad.

THANIA, KIDS HELPLINE COUNSELLOR: I think it can really help for children and young people to have some sort of ritual or ceremony to acknowledge that loss that they've felt

Thania is a counsellor for Kids Helpline which is a free service kids can use if they need to talk to someone.

They've had a 70 percent increase in calls from fire affected areas. Thania says it’s important for kids to have someone to talk to if they want to.

THANIA: We've had callers talking about guilt for having survived and having their loved ones perish in the fires... not having their clothes, their belongings, not being able to sleep in their own bed which is really, really difficult.

And it's not just kids in the fire zone. Some have also been upset by seeing pictures or hearing stories. Thania says it’s also important to understand that different kids react differently when they're upset.

TANYA: One person may cry and cry and cry and another person might throw themselves into school work and try not to think about it. There are many any ways of dealing with it and there is no right or wrong way to do it

For some people it helps to get back into a routine and that's exactly what's happening here in Alexandra. Its right near the fire zone and you can tell from their drawings that some of these guys have seen some pretty terrible things but now they're excited about going back to school

ALEXANDRA SCHOOL STUDENT: Go out to play and play with my friends.

ALEXANDRA SCHOOL STUDENT: I've been looking forward to writing and reading.

Not all schools have reopened. Some burned down and kids will have to enrol somewhere else. Others are having temporary classrooms brought in. It will be months before things are rebuilt properly but at least they know everyone's behind them.

Website Feedback

INTRO: And we've also been getting tons of messages for bushfire survivors on our website.


Kids have been sending messages of support and telling us how they're donating their time and money to help out. Here's just a few of them:

To everyone who lost their home I am very sorry. I hope that your hearts heal. I'm very very sorry. Zoe

I have been devastated by the picture on the news of the fury and destruction of the bushfire. Get better soon. Melvin

On Friday we had a uniform free day to raise money to help you. We raised $2 000. We hope you start to feel better soon. Charles Conder Primary

Dear fire-fighters, thank you for working so hard and also for saving lots of people. You are the best people ever. Kaiti

Thank you everyone. I was in Victoria visiting my aunt and uncle when it happened. I got one leg burn and my cousin’s arm was burnt. My smaller cousin Sam didn’t make it, neither did the cats. Apart from that we got out ok.



Jess

Presenter

Hope Jess and everyone else get better soon. Right now Sarah is actually in the fire zone finding out how kids are rebuilding their lives.

We'll have a special report from her next week. In the meantime, Catherine has an update on the fires in the Wire.

The Wire

Authorities are warning that the fire risk in Victoria isn't over yet.

Some fires are still burning in parts of the state and extreme weather this week could fan them out of control.

Families are being told that if they are going to evacuate they should do it early.

And in Britain, doctors have raised hopes of an effective treatment for nut allergies.

A clinical trial has helped children build up a tolerance to peanuts - by eating them.

It's the first time anyone has been successfully de-sensitised to a food-related allergy.

Stimulus Package

Reporter, Nathan Bazley

INTRO: OK time to talk money. The world economic crisis has stretched into the new year and doesn't even look close to being over. Many countries are suffering, including Australia.

But the government has announced a pretty interesting way of helping us ride through this tough period. They're giving a lot of us a whole lot of cash and they want us to spend up big!

But is it as good as it sounds?

Plants can really suffer under the sweltering summer sun.

Scorching heat and no rain can leave them looking, well, a little sad.

NATHAN BAZLEY, REPORTER: Unfortunately our economy is in a very similar shape. The global financial crisis has wilted our economy, leaving it looking pretty droopy. But a plan to give it a helping hand has been announced. It's called a 'stimulus package'.

A sick plant and a sick economy actually have a lot in common. Both need to be stimulated to grow.

And what stimulates a plant? Well let's try water and fertiliser!

Just like this plant, the economy needs something similar to stimulate it.

When an economy stops growing it's called a RECESSION and that's not a good thing!

So what food will get the economy growing again?!

Well, we feed the economy cash, and lots of it!

It all works on the theory that if we're given more money we'll go on a spending spree!

That will increase sales for shops and other businesses, which will make more jobs, which will help the economy to grow.

The package is worth around 42 billion bucks and nearly 10 million Australians will get a slice.

People earning under $100,000 a year will get as much as 900 bucks each!

Some farmers, parents and students will also get a share.

Even kids will benefit. Well kinda!

KEVIN RUDD: Here's a question for you guys. How many primary schools do you think there are in Australia? In the whole country?

STUDENT: 7,500.

Now the Prime Minister doesn't just go quizzing kids for no reason. He came to this school to announce that along with cash handouts, schools would receive 14.7 billion dollars for new buildings, libraries and other facilities.

As well as that, heaps of housing will be built and lots of homes will get free insulation too.

NATHAN BAZLEY, REPORTER: All this free money and spending sounds really great, but there is a downside!

If you keep giving out more and more and more and more money, you'll eventually go into debt!

And the government is estimating the package will push us into the red - to the tune of 22 billion dollars!

Ouch!


It's for that reason that the opposition is against the idea.

They say that it's too much debt for the country to handle, because the government and taxpayers will have to pay it back at some point!

Also - some critics reckon the plan might not work because most people will just save the money instead of spending it right now.

The government has admitted that they're not even sure if this very expensive plan will work but they say this economic crisis is so bad that we have to do something.

And we're not the only ones. England, USA and many other countries are all doing the same thing and holding their breath for the results.

So the lesson here? Stimulating a plant to grow is pretty easy. Stimulating a whole economy is a very different challenge.



Presenter

Let's hope the economy fares a lot better than that poor pot plant did. Now let’s do a quiz.

Quiz 1

How does a Great White Shark detect its prey?



Does it use –



  1. Sight

  2. Smell

  3. Hearing

Answer: All three. The Great White also has something called electro-reception which means it can detect the electrical field generated by the nerves of its prey.

Shark Attacks

Reporter, Catherine Ellis

INTRO: Next we're going to meet a girl who was attacked by a great white but managed to wrestle it - and survive to tell the tale!


It's just one of many of attacks that have happened this summer and Catherine has been investigating.

CATHERINE ELLIS, REPORTER: Hannah Mighall's surf board looks like something out of a Jaws movie.

And it's a clear reminder to the 13-year-old that she's lucky to be alive.

The attack happened when she was surfing with her cousin at a popular beach in Tassie last month.

HANNAH, VICTIM: I was just sort of sitting on my board and this black shadow came up at me and grabbed my leg.

The five-metre shark dragged her under - her cousin Syb rushed to help her.

SYB, COUSIN: She disappeared a few times and come up screaming and hitting it.

Syb kept punching the shark until it finally let go - he put Hannah on his board and paddled for their lives.

SYB: It was coming up underneath us. We just had to stop and face it to try and fend it off.

They made it back to shore and Hannah was rushed to hospital where she had 200 stitches.

This was the first attack on a Tassie beach in years.

And just recently a surfer was mauled by a shark in the first attack at Sydney's famous Bondi Beach in eighty years.

Two days earlier a Navy diver had his hand ripped off in Sydney Harbour in the first attack there in more than a decade.

So what's going on?

CATHERINE: Well according to the experts the number of shark attacks hasn't changed. They say there's around 16 attacks along Australia's coast each year and it's been that way for fifty years.

DR RAY NIAS, WWF: More people are killed every year in Australia by household pets than are killed by sharks.

Marine scientists say the number of sharks in the water is actually declining because of overfishing.

They estimate around 100 million sharks are killed each year - mainly for shark fin soup.

But some species are protected in Australia and can't be fished, like the Great White Shark or Grey Nurse and consequently some researches reckon their numbers are rising.

So at this stage there're mixed views on whether shark numbers are up or down, but one thing people do agree on is the number of shark sightings is up.

Experts say that's because our beaches are cleaner so sharks are easier to spot and our population is bigger so there's more people to spot them.

Authorities in Sydney are now talking about installing more shark nets to protect people, upgrading warning signs and having more aerial patrols.

CATHERINE: But aerial patrols aren't any good at dawn or dusk and that's when sharks are most active - so we should avoid swimming then.

We should also keep out of murky water, especially near river mouths.

But some experts say sharks don't actually like humans, they bite for a taste, but are disappointed because we're not delicious like fish!

After Hannah was attacked, authorities went searching for that shark, but she just wanted it left alone.

HANNAH: I don't want them to kill the shark... I want it to live... I was in its territory.

SYB: You've just got to put it into your head that it was a freak accident. You spend a lot of time in the water over the years and it has only happened once.

When Hannah recovers she plans to return to the water and surf again.

Online Poll

Now some people are saying sharks should be killed to reduce the risk so we'll make that our online poll this week.

The question is "Should sharks be culled?"

If you want to vote go to our website at abc.net.au/btn

East Timor Volunteers

INTRO: For most of you it might seem like a long way off, but eventually, you'll leave school! And after 12 years of hard work you'll probably want to celebrate! But have you given any thought to how you'll do that?

Well, you might be inspired by the next story.

17 West Australian students chose a very different way to celebrate the end of school and at the same time help out needy people in a country not far from here. Sarah got the story.

For most of you it might seem like a long way off, but eventually, you'll leave school! And after 12 years of hard work you'll probably want to celebrate! But have you given any thought to how you'll do that?

Well, you might be inspired by the next story. 17 West Australian students chose a very different way to celebrate the end of school and at the same time help out needy people in a country not far from here.

SARAH LARSEN, REPORTER: When the bells ring on the last day of the last year of their school lives lots of kids want to celebrate. Some choose to party at schoolies or leavers week but that has a bit of a bad reputation and kids can get into trouble.

REPORTER: But not everyone chooses to remember their school years like this. We're about to meet a group of kids who will look back on a very different picture.

When school finished last year, these guys decided to ditch the beaches and bands and take a plane to East Timor.

East Timor is just north of Australia in Asia and did you know that it’s the world's newest country?

It used to be part of Indonesia until 6 years ago when it was given independence. There were huge celebrations but after that things didn't go so smoothly. There was fighting between the government and rebel groups.

That was bad news for a place that was already pretty poor and didn't have a lot of things Australians take for granted like good roads and hospitals.

But now the East Timorese are trying to rebuild their country and that's where our schoolies come in. They were here helping villagers plant trees and clear fields while their friends were at home partying.

TARA, EAST TIMOR VOLUNTEER: To begin with I was kind of, to be honest, I was kind of, you know, I really am missing out on something. But then as time went on and as Timor became more of a reality I was, like, well you know what it doesn't really matter that I'm missing out on leavers. It is a celebration and it would be a great week but I feel like Timor is a better thing to do with my time

Tara's fellow travellers agreed.

Aimee had never been on a plane before she went to Timor and at first her Dad was a bit worried about letting her go. But when he heard more about what they'd be doing he decided to come along too and put his electrician’s skills to use.

That's because a lot of East Timor doesn't have electricity. They use generators for power and they break down a lot so Aimee's dad was able to fix them.

Many homes also don't have plumbing. Families have to collect their water like this so the Aussies helped out there as well.

The students had to pay their own way and raised more than $100,000 for the project but they say it was definitely worth it.

TARA CLEMENTS: I would say do it. It's nothing. You won't regret it. I can't even... I am just so happy right now: I can't explain how amazing you feel when you come back. It's awesome.

The East Timor trip was such a success that its organisers hope to do it again next year. They reckon there are other developing countries that could use a hand and more students who want a more meaningful way to celebrate the end of school.


Presenter

Giving up party time to help others - good work guys!

Time for some sports news now. Here's the Score.

The Score

An 18-year-old amateur from New Zealand has surprised the golfing world with victory in the Vines Classic in Perth.

Korean-born Danny Lee finished one shot ahead. The win makes him the youngest player to ever win a professional European Tour event

Adelaide United will get another crack at Melbourne in the A-league grand final after beating Queensland 1-0.

Fabian Barbiero bagged the winner for the home side in the 25th minute with this awesome shot.

And the annual penny farthing championships have been held in Tassie.

63 competitors took part. One of them was 10 year old Joanna.

Joanna: I'm happy about my win and I'm glad I didn't fall off because that would just be very embarrassing.

And with no brakes that's understandable.

Quiz 2

Time for another quiz.



How many Olympic Rings are there?

  1. 4

  2. 5

  3. 6

Answer: 5 and the rings stand for passion, faith, victory, work ethic, and sportsmanship.

Kids Olympics

INTRO: Do you dream about one day representing the country in your favourite sport?

Well over the summer holidays many kids got the chance to do that because an Olympics was held especially for young people!

Competitions were at real Olympic venues and as Catherine reports, Gold medallists were on hand to give advice.

CATHERINE ELLIS, REPORTER: Lighting the flame, flying the flag and the parade of nations - just like the opening ceremony at a real Olympic Games.

And that's the aim of the Australian Youth Olympic Festival - to make it as close to the real thing as possible to prepare kids for the future.

Over six hundred Aussie kids aged 13 to 19 competed against the best young athletes from around the world.

Thirty different countries competed in 17 different sports, over five days.

JAMES ROBERTS, SWIMMER: Oh it's a great experience like for all these other countries to be a part of it and like the best in Australia are here.

CATHERINE: Are you pretty excited about being here?

BRONTE, SWIMMER: Yeah it's really exciting especially being so young. It gives you great preparation for future meets and bigger things.

The events were held at Olympic Park in Sydney which is where the real Games were in 2000.

The kids even got to stay in the Olympic village.

MARNIE, HOCKEY PLAYER: Walking past other countries team officials and stuff like that and all eating in a big dining hall. It's really exciting.

And for the medal winners, there's a proper medal ceremony.

MADDISON, CYCLIST: Oh I’m just ecstatic. I've never been to an event this big and just to come out with any medals at all. I’m so happy.

Around 70 athletes who took part in previous Youth Olympics went on to compete at the Beijing Games last year -including gold medallist Matthew Mitcham.

And he was one of several Olympians helping out at this year’s Festival.

MATTHEW MITCHAM, OLYMPIAN GOLD MEDALLIST: Just hanging around during their training and their competitions and should they need to talk to me about something or ask advice about competition or stress or anything like that, I'll be here to lend an ear and to maybe give a little advice.

CATHERINE: Another big part of the Olympic Games and sport these days is drug testing, so to give kids an idea of what it's all about they took part in drug education lectures and drug tests.

This was the fifth Australian Youth Olympics Festival and it's been such a success the International Olympics Committee is going to run one too - the first one will be in Singapore next year.

So for kids hoping to one day become champion athletes.

CATHERINE: What kind of advice would you give to them?

MATTHEW: Stick with it. Go for it because I've never looked back. Everything that I've sacrificed for my sport it's all come true and it's all been worth it for me.

Australia won 266 medals at this year's Festival. Perhaps you can help the country win gold in the future.


Closer

Who knows? We could be reporting on your success in years to come!



That's it for another show. Don't forget that if you want to send a message of support to the kids affected by the bushfires, there's a special page on our website. Catch ya later.

© ABC 2009




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