Discipline: theatre

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LOS ANGELES UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT


Arts Education Branch

DISCIPLINE: THEATRE

Module Two: Stories in Action: CALIFORNIA HAS A RICH HERITAGE OF STORIES BASED ON DISTINCTIVE HISTORICAL CHARACTERS
Sample Lesson # ONE MOVING TO CALIFORNIA Grade: 4
Standard: 1.2: Identify a character’s objectives and motivations to explain that character’s behavior.

Student Objective: dramatize through pantomime and tableau an historical journey of characters from the East to California during the Gold Rush era.

Resources / Materials: Nametags, Music: “California Here I come” by Al Jolson, Story: Nine for California by Solia Levitin


Opening Phase

Gathering/

Warming-up

(2 minutes)



1. Enter as prospectors during the Gold Rush.

2. Body & Imagination: Use “California Here I come” music to do stretching, focusing exercises in circle.


Exploring/Creating Phase

Exploring

(6 minutes)



Walk about as characters from Nine for California: banker, teacher, stage coach driver, side-kick with lariat, crying baby, little kids, buffalo, Pawnee Indians, bandits, People waving goodbye, Pa, welcoming family.

Review/Preview/ Vocabulary

(5 minutes)



Vocabulary: Gold Rush, Conflict

Review: Tableau, Pantomime, Character, Objective, Motivation


Improvising/

Inventing

Story

(20 minutes)



1. Share story: Nine for California.

2. Brainstorm: characters

3. Flow map: plot


Sharing/Reflecting Phase

Playmaking

(10 minutes)




Half class: create tableau of stage coach journey to California including characters and actors as stage coach/setting. Share with each other.

Reflecting/

Journal Prompt

(7 minutes)



1. Pair Share: Describe your home in California. Describe any other place you have lived.

2. Journal: Describe how you got from another place to California, your home.




Connections/Extensions: Westward Movement
Teacher Task: For the next lesson, teacher will have students enter as though packing to move.
LOS ANGELES UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Arts Education Branch

DISCIPLINE: THEATRE

Module Two: Stories in Action: CALIFORNIA HAS A RICH HERITAGE OF STORIES BASED ON DISTINCTIVE HISTORICAL CHARACTERS

Sample Lesson # TWO Personal History Grade: 4
Standard: 2.1Demonstrate emotional traits of the character through gesture and action.

Student Objective: dramatize with other students a personal story about arrival in California as a home.


Resources / Materials: Nametags, Music, journal entries from previous week (personal stories or parent stories about coming to California).


Opening Phase

Gathering/

Warming-up

(3 minutes)



1. Students enter as though packing to move.

2. Body: Students in whole group circle, stretch and move to appropriate music such as “Homeward Bound” by Simon and Garfunkel.

Exploring/Creating Phase

Exploring

(7 minutes)




Imagination: “Ritual of the Hour” exercise: Whole group works individually and simultaneously. pantomime actions/activities done at a certain time during a “typical” weekday. (“It is 6 a.m. on Wednesday: show what you are doing… It is now 7 a.m., what are you doing?” etc.) Students freeze after each “ritual” action.

Review/Preview/ Vocabulary

(5 minutes)



1. New Vocabulary: Biography, Autobiography

2. Review: pantomime, tableau, improvisation, dialogue, conflict, positive critique

Improvising/

Inventing

Story


(15 minutes)

1. Pairs: share journal entries. (How student or student’s family came to California, from where, etc.)

2. groups of 4 to 6: Share partners’ stories. Choose one story to present theatrically to class.


3. Rehearse: Use pantomime, improvisation, dialogue (combinations there of). Scenes should be less than 5 minutes.


Sharing/Reflecting Phase

Playmaking

(15 minutes)



Share: original stories. Positive critique from audience: what went well in performance? what could be improved?

Reflecting/

Journal Prompt

(5 minutes)



1. Discussion: What are some careers/jobs for the pioneers who came to California during the Gold Rush era?

2. Journal: Write descriptions of as many jobs or careers that might have been needed or desired during the early part of California history.


Connections/Extensions: Dollars & Sense

Teacher Task: Support students in Journal response: preview Wells Fargo piece

LOS ANGELES UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Arts Education Branch

DISCIPLINE: THEATRE

Module TWO: Stories in Action: CALIFORNIA HAS A RICH HERITAGE OF STORIES BASED ON DISTINCTIVE HISTORICAL CHARACTERS
Sample Lesson #­­ THREE Business Men & Women of California History (Part 1) Grade: 4
Standard: 1.2 Identify a character’s objectives and motivations to explain that character’s behavior

Student Objective: Dramatize the characters/plot of a realistic fiction based on California commercial history.

Resources / Materials: name tags, music, “Boom Town” by Sonia Levitin, pictures, pie visual, pie recipe



Opening Phase

Gathering/

Warming-up

(10 minutes)




1. Students enter as characters who would be riding in a Wells Fargo wagon.

2. Body: Use stimulating music from “Paint Your Wagon” for whole group physical warm up.

3. Voice: Sing/chant Pa’s song: So I got me a mule, and some mining tools, a shovel and a pick and a pan:

But I work all day, without no pay. I guess I’m a foolish man. use different emotions.

Exploring/Creating Phase

Exploring

(10 minutes)





Imagination: Walkabouts: Brothers Billy, Joe and Ted taking a bath; Baby Betsy and Amanda looking for shooting stars;

Brothers planting corn, potatoes and beans; brothers Climbing trees; Ma washing clothes; Ma making soap; Brothers building fire; Amanda sweeping floors; Amanda being bored; Peddler Pete with sore feet; Cobbler making shoes; barber shaving; Cowboy Charlie tending horses; Tailor sewing clothes; Blacksmith making horseshoes; baker baking bread.



Review/Preview/ Vocabulary

(5 minutes)



1. Vocabulary Review: tableau, character, problem/resolution, Improvisation, Ensemble

2. List characters: Pa, Amanda, Ma, Billy, Ted, Joe, Baby Betsy, Peddler Pete, Prospector-Laundry, cobbler, barber, apothecary, Cowboy Charlie, MR. Hooper, Miss Camilla, preacher

Improvising/

Inventing

Story

(20) minutes)



story tell BOOM TOWN, by Sonia Levitin

Dramatize as story is told.




Sharing/Reflecting Phase

Playmaking

next lesson



In groups of 5-6: next lesson dramatize scenes

Reflecting/

Journal Prompt

(5 minutes)



Journal: Do flow map of BOOM TOWN. Sequence of events




Connections/Extensions: Dreams into Jobs
Teacher Task: Bring Flow Map. Have students enter as a character from Boom Town.

LOS ANGELES UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Arts Education Branch

DISCIPLINE: THEATRE

Module TWO: Stories in Action: CALIFORNIA HAS A RICH HERITAGE OF STORIES BASED ON DISTINCTIVE HISTORICAL CHARACTERS

Sample Lesson #­­ FOUR Business Men & Women of California History (Part 2) Grade: 4
Standard: 1.2 Identify a character’s objectives and motivations to explain that character’s behavior

Student Objective: Dramatize the characters/plot of a realistic fiction based on California commercial history.

Resources / Materials: name tags, music, “Boom Town” by Sonia Levitin, pictures

Opening Phase


Gathering/

Warming-up

(5 minutes)




1. Teacher has students enter as characters from story.

2. Body: Use stimulating music from “Paint Your Wagon” for whole group physical warm up.

3. Voice: Sing/chant Pa’s song: So I got me a mule, and some mining tools, a shovel and a pick and a pan:

But I work all day, without no pay. I guess I’m a foolish man. Add movements.

Exploring/Creating Phase

Exploring

(5 minutes)




Walkabout as characters doing activities: Amanda baking pies; Billy building a shelf; blacksmith making horseshoes; prospector washing clothes; farmers bringing wagons and sacks full of feed; Joe getting wood for fire; Ted washing fruit; baby Betsy stirring sugar; Pa and brothers building big room for bakery; Miss Camilla teaching students

Review/Preview/ Vocabulary

(10 minutes)



Vocabulary Review: tableau, character, problem/resolution, Improvisation, Ensemble, skillet, Peddler, Trading Post, tailor, apothecary, preacher


Improvising/

Inventing

Story

(5 minutes)



Review story; flow maps

Sharing/Reflecting Phase

Playmaking

(20 minutes)


1. groups of 5-6: Each group choose one of the scenes from BOOM TOWN to present: (suggestions or from flow maps)


  1. Amanda experimenting with pies; Brothers kicking crusts around; Amanda making pies and having success

  2. Selling Amanda’s Pies; Peddler Pete establishing Trading Post for pans and buckets.

  3. Cooper making barrels; tanner curing hides; laundry person; cobbler; barber; apothecary; Cowboy Charlie and Livery

  4. MR. HOOPER and Bank—giving loans, establishing savings

  5. Reverend growing a church

  6. Miss Camilla teaching students

2. Whole group: tableau of BOOMTOWN. Bring to life in sections/ sequence.

Reflecting/

Journal Prompt

(5 minutes)



Journal: How did Amanda’s desire to bake Gooseberry pies help create BOOMTOWN?




Connections/Extensions: Dreams to Jobs

Teacher Task: Teacher will have students enter class as a business person from early California.


LOS ANGELES UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Arts Education Branch

DISCIPLINE: THEATRE

Module TWO: Stories in Action: CALIFORNIA HAS A RICH HERITAGE OF STORIES BASED ON DISTINCTIVE HISTORICAL CHARACTERS

Sample Lesson #­­ FIVE

Business Men & Women of California History: Levi Strauss (Part 1) Grade: 4
Standard: 5.1 Dramatize events in California history

Student Objective: Become familiar with historical persons who built California through business and social interaction and dramatize the work of those characters.


Resources / Materials: name tags, music, Wells Fargo (OCR), MR. Blue Jeans by Maryann N. Weidt, 2 heavy back packs, pictures


Opening Phase

Gathering/

Warming-up

(10 minutes)




1. Teacher has students enter as characters who would travel on a Wells Fargo wagon.

2. Body: warm up to music from “Paint Your Wagon.”

3. Imagination: Walkabout as peddler carrying 100 lb. sack on back, 80 lb. sack on back. Respond to weather and environmental obstacles.

Exploring/Creating Phase

Exploring

(10 minutes)



Groups of 4-5: tableau of Wells Fargo functions: BANK; STAGE COACH TRAVEL SERVICE; LETTER DELIVERY; TRANSPORTING GOLD (SHOW POLICY: IF ROBBERS ATTACK, NO LOSS OF HUMAN LIFE. GIVE UP THE GOLD.)

Review/Preview/ Vocabulary

(10 minutes)



1. Vocabulary: tableau, Immigrants, dry goods, denim

2. Share highlights of Levi Strauss’ life from book – Mr. Blue Jeans.

3. brainstorm items Levi would have for sale.

Improvising/

Inventing

Story

(15 minutes)


Small groups: re-enact Levi Strauss arriving in San Francisco and selling goods at wharf for gold. Re-enact Levi and brothers selling in store in San Francisco: pants, shirts, blankets, tin plates, cups, mops, etc.


Sharing/Reflecting Phase

Playmaking

(0 minutes)



This will be done in Part 2.

Reflecting/

Journal Prompt

(minutes 5)



Journal: How did family influence Levi Strauss’ business decisions?



Connections/Extensions: Social Studies
Teacher Task: explore with students historical figures in CA history who helped to create prosperity and commerce.

LOS ANGELES UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Arts Education Branch

DISCIPLINE: THEATRE

Module TWO: Stories in Action: CALIFORNIA HAS A RICH HERITAGE OF STORIES BASED ON DISTINCTIVE HISTORICAL CHARACTERS

Sample Lesson #­­ SIX

Business Men & Women of California History: Levi Strauss (Part 2) Grade: 4
Standard: 5.1 Dramatize events in California history

Student Objective: Become familiar with historical persons who built California through business and social interaction and dramatize the work of those characters.

Resources / Materials: name tags, music, Wells Fargo (OCR), MR. Blue Jeans by Maryann N. Weidt, pictures, pieces of denim ad canvas, jeans

Opening Phase


Gathering/

Warming-up

(10 minutes)




1. Teacher has students enter as Levi Strauss.

2. Body: warm up to music from “Paint Your Wagon.”

3. Imagination and voice: Walkabout/improvisation as Levi Strauss stocking store and preparing salesmen.

Exploring/Creating Phase

Exploring

(10 minutes)



Share: Highlights of Levi Strauss’ life from book – Mr. Blue Jeans.

Review/Preview/ Vocabulary

(5 minutes)



1. Vocabulary: tableau, Immigrants, dry goods, denim


Improvising/

Inventing

Story

(5 minutes)



A/B improv: Miner and Levi: Miner needs good sturdy pants/Levi wants to sell some to him but only has canvas. Levi and tailor: Levi wants tailor to make pair of canvas pants/Tailor wants to finish a job and is strapped for time but agrees to do it.


Sharing/Reflecting Phase

Playmaking

(15 minutes)


Ensemble: choose an event from Levi Strauss’ life that shows his importance in CA history. Create a tableau showing that part of Levi Strauss contribution to CA history. Be prepared to bring the tableau to life with dialogue and action.


Reflecting/

Journal Prompt

(minutes 5)



Journal: What qualities did Levi Strauss show that made him a successful businessman in early California history? How can you use his example in your own life to be successful?



Connections/Extensions: Social Studies
Teacher Task: explore with students historical figures in CA history who helped to create prosperity and commerce.

LOS ANGELES UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Arts Education Branch

DISCIPLINE: THEATRE
Module Two: Stories in Action: California has a rich heritage of stories based on distinctive historical characters.

Sample Lesson # SEVEN

BUSINESS MEN & WOMEN OF CALIFORNIA HISTORY: BIDDY MASON (Part 1) Grade: 4
Standard: 5.1Dramatize events in California History.

1.2 Identify a Character’s objectives and motivations to explain that character’s behavior.



Student Objective: Become familiar with historical persons who built California through business and social interaction and dramatize the work of those characters.

Resources / Materials: name tags, With Open Hands by Jeri Chase Ferris, Music “Motherless Child,” Biddy Mason pictures & background, emancipation proclamation, maps


Opening Phase

Gathering/

Warming-up

(10 minutes)

1. Teacher has students enter as a prosperous business character from early California.

2. Body & Imagination: Walkabout: cooking, cleaning, scrubbing floors, sweeping fireplace, hauling firewood, making fire, washing clothes & dishes, making soap, baking yams. Add conditions of hot weather, cold weather; use “Motherless Child” song.

3. Voice: Call and Response: Leader: “If you hold your hand closed,” Group: “nothing good can come in.” Leader: “The open hand is blessed, for it gives in abundance.” Group: “even as it receives.”


Exploring/Creating Phase

Exploring

(10 minutes)




1. Pantomime activities (individual, simultaneous): discovering herbs and plants for medicine, grinding and mixing.

2. Improvisation: healer and sick person. parent and child packing to leave home, deciding what to bring (sparingly…extra dress, rag doll, medicines). slave owner ordering slave to prepare family for traveling across country in covered wagon.

Review/Preview/ Vocabulary

(5 minutes)



Review: biography, tableau, improvisation, dialogue, conflict, character, objective, motivation

New: Mormon, slavery, bribe, Emancipation Proclamation 1863

Improvising

Inventing/Story

(15 minutes)



1. Story-tell highlights of Biddy Mason’s life through arrival in Los Angeles.


2. Share images of Biddy Mason Memorial in L.A.


Sharing/Reflecting Phase

Playmaking

(0 minutes)



This will be done in Part 2.


Reflecting/

Journal Prompt

(10 minutes)



Discussion: Do you think Biddy did the “right thing” when she decided not to stay with Mr. Smith and his family—even though she had been well treated by them for 19 years?

Journal: What is more important to you – freedom or security? Explain your reasons.


Connections/Extensions: Slavery; Civil War; Lincoln’s assassination
Teacher Task: For beginning of next lesson, have students enter as Biddy Mason.

LOS ANGELES UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Arts Education Branch

DISCIPLINE: THEATRE
Module Two: Stories in Action: California has a rich heritage of stories based on distinctive historical characters.

Sample Lesson # EIGHT

BUSINESS MEN & WOMEN OF CALIFORNIA: BIDDY MASON (Part 2) Grade: 4
Standard: 5.1 Dramatize events in California History.

1.2 Identify a Character’s objectives and motivations to explain that character’s behavior.



Student Objective: Become familiar with historical persons who built California through business and social interaction and dramatize the work of those characters.

Resources / Materials: name tags, With Open Hands by Jeri Chase Ferris, Music “Motherless Child,” Biddy Mason pictures & background, emancipation proclamation, map of Los Angeles, small pictures



Opening Phase

Gathering/

Warming-up

(5 minutes)



1. Teacher has students enter as Biddy Mason.

2. Body & Imagination: Walkabout: walking to homes (dust, heat, mud, rain); saving money, looking for property to buy; use “Motherless Child” song.

3. Voice: Call and Response: Leader: “If you hold your hand closed,” Group: “nothing good can come in.” Leader: “The open hand is blessed, for it gives in abundance.” Group: “even as it receives.”

Exploring/Creating Phase

Exploring

(5 minutes)




Improvisation: healer and sick person – contagious disease, language problem, unable to pay

Review/Preview/ Vocabulary

(5 minutes)



Review: biography, tableau, improvisation, dialogue, conflict, character, objective, motivation

New: Livery & Feed, midwife, nooning

Improvising

Inventing/Story

(15 minutes)




1. Story-tell highlights of Biddy Mason’s life beginning with Los Angeles.

2. Share images of Biddy Mason Memorial in L.A.

3. Brainstorm events to theatricalize. Choose 6 scenes to dramatize in small groups.

4. Establish criteria. (Projection, articulation, expression; face audience, use tableau, show clear conflict, objectives and motivations.)


Sharing/Reflecting Phase

Playmaking

(15 minutes)



Small ensembles (4-6). Assign group “leader”. Assign scene to each group. Identify conflict in each scene. Use beginning and ending tableaux. Each character must have dialogue. Prepare and share scenes.


Reflecting/

Journal Prompt

(5 minutes)



Discussion: What was most important to Biddy Mason? How was she similar to Levi Strauss?

Journal: Biddy never learned to read or write. How could she have done even more good things for people if she had been educated?


Connections/Extensions: Slavery; Civil War; Lincoln’s assassination

Teacher Task: For beginning of next lesson, have students enter as either slave or slave owner.

LOS ANGELES UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Arts Education Branch

DISCIPLINE: THEATRE

Module TWO: Stories in Action: CALIFORNIA HAS A RICH HERITAGE OF STORIES BASED ON DISTINCTIVE HISTORICAL CHARACTERS

Sample Lesson #­­ NINE CHINESE CONTRIBUTION (Part 1) Grade: 4

Standard: 1.2 Identify a character’s objectives and motivations to explain that character’s behavior

5.1 Dramatize events in California State History.



Student Objective: Dramatize the characters/plot of realistic fiction based on California history.

Resources / Materials: name tags, music, Chang’s Paper Pony by Coerr; pictures—Chinese contribution to CA, charts for lines & new vocabulary


Opening Phase

Gathering/

Warming-up

(5 minutes)




1. Teacher has students enter as a slave or a slave owner. Transform into character that knows no one else and is unable to communicate with anyone.

2. Body: Star (2, 3, 4, 5 or 6): Whole group activity-must form star formation with specific # of students within 10 seconds.

Exploring/Creating Phase

Exploring

(8 minutes)




1. Body & Imagination: Walkabout as characters doing activities: Young child/old grandpa peeling potatoes; child throwing stones in pond, then at someone; child (day-dreaming about pony) setting table, fetching water from well, carrying wood to stove; Miner pulling kid’s pig tail; child petting pony, writing/painting words in English and Chinese; teacher scolding child; Miner (then as child) digging for gold, panning for gold. Child sweeping up gold dust from floor.

2. Voice: As lonely child: “I want to go home to China” “My humble name is Chang.” As Kind Grandpa: “Maybe the Fat God of Luck will smile upon you.” As strict teacher: “If you don’t stop playing you will be an empty bamboo—good for nothing.” As Big Pete the Prospector: “Go easy, partner.”

Review/Preview/ Vocabulary

(7 minutes)



Vocabulary Review: tableau, setting, character, conflict, resolution

New: pengyo (friend), tsu (child), jen (man), shan (mountain), ma (horse)



Improvising/

Inventing

Story

(10 minutes)





1. Read/share “Chang’s Paper Pony.”

2. List Settings and characters.

3. A/B improvisations: Chang & Grandpa Li—Chang wants real pony (lonely for friends)/Li wants to comfort Chang and get him back to work. Miner & Chang—Chang wants to be polite/miner wants to make fun of Chang. Chang & Teacher—Chang wants to dream about Ma—pony/Teacher wants Chang to do writing. Chang & Grandpa Li—Chang wants to keep gold dust to buy pony/Li wants Chang to give gold back to Big Pete. Chang and Big Pete—Chang wants to forget about dream pony and clean Big Pete’s cabin/Pete wants to surprise Chang with pony.

Sharing/Reflecting Phase

Playmaking

(15 minutes)




1. Five groups: Each ensemble takes one chapter. Start and end with tableau. Use dialogue in between to dramatize events of chapter. 1. Chang’s Wish; 2. Trouble; 3. Big Pete; 4. Gold Fever; 5. The Real Pony

2. Establish criteria for performance.

3. Share scenes.

Reflecting/

Journal Prompt

(5 minutes)



Journal: Write about a time when you were in a new place (new home, new school or class) and you had no friends. How did you find friends? (or did you?) Why did you want to have friends? Why are they important?

Connections/Extensions: OCR Dreams to Jobs; Social Studies—Chinese laborers in Gold Rush era


Teacher Task: Explore with students various contributions Chinese people made to growth and prosperity of California. Prepare students to enter as a child who must follow all directions exactly.

LOS ANGELES UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Arts Education Branch

DISCIPLINE: THEATRE

Module TWO: Stories in Action: CALIFORNIA HAS A RICH HERITAGE OF STORIES BASED ON DISTINCTIVE HISTORICAL CHARACTERS

Sample Lesson #­­ TEN CHINESE CONTRIBUTION (Part 2) Grade: 4

Standard: 1.2 Identify a character’s objectives and motivations to explain that character’s behavior.

5.1 Dramatize events in California History.



Student Objective: Dramatize the characters/plot of realistic fiction based on California history.

Resources / Materials: name tags, music, The Iron Dragon Never Sleeps by Krensky, pictures—Chinese contribution to CA, dialogue charts

Opening Phase

Gathering/

Warming-up

(5 minutes)



1. Enter as character of child who must follow directions exactly.

2. Isolation: Teacher separates those wearing blue jeans from others. The blue-jean group gets to participate in the activities (who circle stretching) while others are told to sit in corners, not move or talk. (“alienation” exercise) After 2-3 minutes, class discusses how that made them feel – as privileged group or ostracized group.

Exploring/Creating Phase

Exploring

(10 minutes)




1. Imagination: Walkabout as characters doing activities: Child on bumpy train, trying to sketch. Child walking along sheer granite cliff over looking river, sketching scene. Chinese railroad worker being lowered down cliff, chipping away at mountain, caught in explosion. Child in General Store shopping for candy. Store owner reacting to bothersome customer, then to “nice” customer. Chinese child shopping for bowl. Chinese workers carrying tea kegs on poles, digging out tunnel. Boss yelling at, encouraging workers. Child enjoying familiar favorite supper; child having to eat strange looking and smelling vegetables. Chinese child taking “sponge” bath, putting on clean clothes. Chinese workers in underground tunnel---shaking and collapsing. Starving child eating an apple. Miners trying to dig out men trapped in exploded mine.

2. Voice: Angry Store Owner: “Hurry up, China Boy!” Polite Chinese child: “I need a bowl, please.” Eager child: “I’d like to go in the tunnel with you, Papa!” Amazed child: “A bath every night?” Concerned mother: “Eat up, Winnie. Your dinner’s getting cold.” Bored doctor: “The Celestials have their own ways and medicines. I’m sure he’s doing fine.” Boss shouting orders: “Step Aside! Make room!”

Review/Preview/ Vocabulary

(5 minutes)



1. Vocabulary Review: tableau, setting, character, conflict, resolution

New: Celestials, Union Pacific Railroad (building west from Omaha), Central Pacific RR (building east from Sacramento)

2. Context: Deal with the personal issues, then the social implications.

Improvising/

Inventing

Story

(15 minutes)




1. Story-telling: highlights of “Iron Dragon.”

2. Analyze: Make settings and character lists.

3. List Conflicts: a. Union Pacific/Central Pacific the more track rr puts down, more land it collects. B. Chinese and Caucasians. C. Chinese laborers/railroad bosses.

4. List “unique” cultural traits of Chinese people.

5. A/B Improvisation: A—objective: to play tug-o-war with B. B—objective: to play catch with A. Problem: B speaks and understands only gibberish; A speaks and understands only English. Solve the conflict.

List Sharing/Reflecting Phase

Playmaking

(10 minutes)




1. A/B improvisations: Winnie and Lee (first meeting in General Store. Teacher in role as Store Owner.) Father and Winnie (Winnie wants to go to the tunnel/Father wants her to be safe). Winnie and Lee (Winnie tries to fly kite, Lee helps her). Leader of Chinese workers wants to be treated fairly, threatens to strike/railroad boss tries to convince worker leader to stay on job.

2. Tableaux: Divide class into two groups. Each creates a tableau of the explosion scene at the tunnel (8 men stuck in tunnel. Designate Celestials and “whites” who won’t work with Chinese.)

3. A/B improv: Doctor/Winnie. Lee/Winnie at the end (Winnie is leaving on the train, wants to say goodbye to Lee. Lee has a present (kite) to give her. Train is leaving; Lee must work quickly.)

Reflecting/

Journal Prompt

(5 minutes)


Journal: Do a double-bubble map of the two main characters: Lee and Winnie. How are they the same and different? Write a paragraph explaining why Winnie defended the “Celestials” throughout the story.



Connections/Extensions: OCR Dreams to Jobs; Social Studies—Chinese laborers in Gold Rush era

Teacher Task: Discuss with students the work that women were “allowed” to do in the Gold Rush era. Do you think women have more opportunities in 2008 than in 1867? What about Winnie and Lee? Why were their opportunities different?

LOS ANGELES UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Arts Education Branch

DISCIPLINE: THEATRE

Module TWO: Stories in Action: CALIFORNIA HAS A RICH HERITAGE OF STORIES BASED ON DISTINCTIVE HISTORICAL CHARACTERS

Sample Lesson #­­ ELEVEN WOMEN’S CONTRIBUTION Grade: 4

Standard: 1.2 Identify a character’s objectives and motivations to explain that character’s behavior.

5.1 Dramatize events in California History.



Student Objective: Dramatize the story of One-Eyed Charley—the California Whip.

Resources / Materials: name tags, music, One-Eyed Charley The California Whip by Randall Reinstedt, Pictures of women in CA history


Opening Phase

Gathering/

Warming-up

(5 minutes)



1. Teacher has students enter as a character from the Gold Rush Era doing a “typical” task.

2. Body & Imagination: Simultaneously/individually pantomime work typically done by women in California in the mid-to-late 19th century. Then pantomime work typically done by men in California in the mid-to-late 19th century.


Exploring/Creating Phase

Exploring

(10 minutes)



1. Groups of 4-5: Count off in each group. Role of stagecoach driver rotates with each activity. #1: stagecoach driver. 2-5 are passengers. 1) driver guides coach along narrow curved steep mountain road. (rotate #2 stagecoach driver). 2) on steep mountain with rain and snow, wind buffeting coach. (rotate) 3) stage stuck in mud (rotate) 4) Stage held up by bandits (rotate) 5)tree falls across road, horse throws a shoe, coach looses wheel…

2. Voice: Sound collage of busy Sacramento – river town—scene Gold Rush times: steamboats, hustle bustle’ –whoopin’ ‘n hollerin’---different languages, horses, people trying to keep track of luggage from coaches, whips cracking, drivers shouting names of cities: Fiddletown, Angel’s camp, Whiskey Slide, Rattlesnake Bar, Bear Valley, etc.

Review/Preview/ Vocabulary

(5 minutes)



1. Vocabulary Review: tableau, setting, character, conflict, resolution

New: Concord Coach, Whips, jehus, Knights of the Road.

2. Journals: Share two or three.

Improvising/

Inventing

Story

(15 minutes)



Story-telling: Teacher-in-role as 19th Century, old prospector/storyteller, sharing journal entries.

See attached narrative.


Sharing/Reflecting Phase


Playmaking

(10 minutes)




1. In groups of 4-5: Each group assigned an “adventure” to dramatize, using tableau, dialogue, showing conflict, character and resolution: Sugarfoot episode; coach wheels over coin game/race; Tuolumne Bridge adventure. Eye accident in blacksmith shop. Runaway horses. Charley being considerate of passengers, making room for an “extra”, caring for luggage. Charley in “retirement”—with rheumatism, farming, hanging up whip. Voting for President 1868—storytelling in cabin to young people. 2. Share dramatized episodes.

Reflecting/

Journal Prompt

(5 minutes)



Journal: Why did Charley have to keep her identity a secret? How would her life have been different if she revealed that she was a woman?



Connections/Extensions: Women characters throughout OCR units who challenge the limitations for women throughout history. (Mystery to Medicine; Dollars and Sense)
Teacher Task: Prepare students to enter doing a “job” that could be done by a man or a woman.

LOS ANGELES UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Arts Education Branch

DISCIPLINE: THEATRE

Module TWO: Stories in Action: CALIFORNIA HAS A RICH HERITAGE OF STORIES BASED ON DISTINCTIVE HISTORICAL CHARACTERS

Sample Lesson #­­ TWELVE PONY EXPRESS (Part 1) Grade: 4
Standard: 5.1Dramatize events in California history.

Student Objective: Become familiar with historical persons who built California through business and social interaction and dramatize the work of those characters.


Resources / Materials: name tags, music, Buffalo Bill and the Pony Express by Eleanor Coerr, bandanas, hats, mail pouches, age chart, maps


Opening Phase

Gathering/

Warming-up

(5 minutes)



1. Teacher has students enter as boy proudly leading his new pony in and grooming it.

2. Body: warm up to music from “Hey Mister Postman” or “My Baby Sent me a Letter.”


Exploring/Creating Phase

Exploring

(7 minutes)



1. Imagination: Walkabout: As Pony Express worker loading mailbags onto horse and feeding the horse.

2. Relay Race: Using mail pouches, set up simulation relay of Pony Express system.

Review/Preview/ Vocabulary

(3 minutes)



Vocabulary: Review: conflict, objective, motivation, improvisation, tableau

New: Pony Express, telegraph, Paiute and Sioux Indians

Improvising/

Inventing

Story

(30 minutes)


1. Storytell: Interactive telling of Buffalo Bill and the Pony Express. Students perform sound effects during the telling such as tooting horn, galloping horses, bullets whizzing, wolves howling, thunder storm, buffalo herd stampeding; use age-activity comparison to present his childhood


2. A/B Improvisations: Bill Cody/Mr. Majors (Bill wants job/Majors wants mature employee); Sheriff/Bill Cody (Sheriff wants to fight Terrible Todd/Bill Cody wants a better plan)

3. Eavesdropping: Groups of 4-5 at supper table at Red Buttes recounting adventures of Pony Express.

4. Communication: Scene between Bill and chief Rain-in-the-Face who communicate non-verbally to make plans.


Sharing/Reflecting Phase

Playmaking

(0 minutes)



Will be done in part two.

Reflecting/

Journal Prompt

(minutes 5)



Journal: As Buffalo Bill, write your mother a letter about one of your exploits, being careful not to worry her.



Connections/Extensions: Social Studies
Teacher Task: Prepare students to enter as a character from the story.

LOS ANGELES UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Arts Education Branch

DISCIPLINE: THEATRE

Module TWO: Stories in Action: CALIFORNIA HAS A RICH HERITAGE OF STORIES BASED ON DISTINCTIVE HISTORICAL CHARACTERS

Sample Lesson #­­ THIRTEEN PONY EXPRESS (Part 2) Grade: 4
Standard: 5.1Dramatize events in California history

Student Objective: Become familiar with historical persons who built California through business and social interaction and dramatize the work of those characters.

Resources / Materials: name tags, music, Buffalo Bill and the Pony Express by Eleanor Coerr, bandanas, hats, mail pouches



Opening Phase

Gathering/

Warming-up

(5 minutes)



1. Teacher has students enter as character from story.

2. Body: warm up to music from “Hey Mister Postman” or “My Baby Sent me a Letter.”


Exploring/Creating Phase

Exploring

(10 minutes)



Discussion: What were some of the problems of the Pony Express? What are some current problems with the mail system? What problems can the mail/pony express rider encounter?

Review/Preview/ Vocabulary

(5 minutes)



1. Vocabulary: Review: conflict, objective, motivation, improvisation, tableau

New: Pony Express, telegraph, Paiute and Sioux Indians

2. Journals: 4 or 5 students share journals.

Improvising/

Inventing

Story

(0 minutes)



Done in Part 1


Sharing/Reflecting Phase

Playmaking

(20 minutes)


Groups: Create and share two tableaux: one of modern mail delivery illustrating a problem and one of pony express with a similar problem. Prepare to animate tableaux with movement and dialogue.


Reflecting/

Journal Prompt

(minutes 10)



1. Discussion: Why did the Pony Express last only 18 months? Why do you think the riders were given medals?

2. Journal: Some stories about William and the Pony Express are true; others are fictional or exaggerated. Describe one of your own mail stories with exaggeration.


Connections/Extensions: Social Studies
Teacher Task: Prepare students to enter as though as they were going to perform in a Wild West show.


LOS ANGELES UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Arts Education Branch

DISCIPLINE: THEATRE

Module TWO: Stories in Action: CALIFORNIA HAS A RICH HERITAGE OF STORIES BASED ON DISTINCTIVE HISTORICAL CHARACTERS

Sample Lesson #­­ FOURTEEN WILD WEST SHOW (Part l) Grade: 4
Standard: 5.1Dramatize events in California history

Student Objective: Deepen understanding of life of Buffalo Bill Cody and the development of the Wild West Show.

Resources / Materials: name tags, music, Buffalo Bill by Ingri & Edgar Parin d’Aulaire, Wild West Shows by Judy Alter, Sam’s Wild West Show by Nancy Antle, bandanas, hats, lariats, variety of props and juggling equipment, posters


Opening Phase

Gathering/

Warming-up

(5 minutes)


1. Teacher has students enter as performer in Wild West Show.


2. Body: warm up to music from “Annie Get Your Gun.”


Exploring/Creating Phase

Exploring

(10 minutes)



Imagination: Walkabout: As Buffalo Bill pantomime activities he did for survival in the west such as: herding cattle, hunting buffalo, wrangle buffalo, shoot accurately, ride lying on side of horse, ride quickly, improvise to outsmart outlaws, drove stage coach, use whip effectively, train horses, ride bareback, learned how to rope, sympathized with the Indians, handsome figure as traveled the countryside.

Review/Preview/ Vocabulary

(5 minutes)



1. Vocabulary: Review: conflict, objective, motivation, improvisation, tableau

New: Wild West Show, romanticized hero, tall tales

2. Context: He never had a formal education; taught himself how to read and write. Youngest of Pony Express riders.

Improvising/

Inventing

Story

(25 minutes)



1. Display: Show and talk about development of Buffalo Bill’s life.

2. Set Up Situation: Ned Buntline and Buffalo Bill becoming famous. Hero of several dime novels.

3. Small Groups: Groups of 4-5 create brief story of one of the adventures. Share with one another.

4. Discussion: Wild West Shows development; he called it Buffalo Bill’s Wild West. Women such as Annie Oakley became famous also.

Sharing/Reflecting Phase


Playmaking

(0 minutes)



Will be done in part 2.

Reflecting/

Journal Prompt

(minutes 5)



Journal: Write a description of a Wild West Show that you think would attract a large audience.



Connections/Extensions: Social Studies

Teacher Task: Prepare students to enter as Buffalo Bill or Annie Oakley.


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