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DISCLAIMER STATEMENT

Contributions of many individuals and from many written resources have collectively made this curriculum guide possible. The major authors, however, do not claim or guarantee that its contents will eliminate acts of malpractice or negligence. The responsibility to adhere to safety standards and best professional practices is the duty of the practitioners, teachers, students, and/or others who apply the contents of this document.



This guide was developed with federal CARL D. PERKINS Career and Technical Education ACT of 2006 funds.

Career and Technical Education

North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

6361 Mail Service Center Raleigh, NC 27699-6361

The materials in this guide were adapted from the course guide “Marketing Principles” from the MBA Research and Curriculum Center. Materials may be reproduced for use in NC Public Schools only.

FOREWORD

This curriculum framework guide, Marketing, was adapted to assist teachers in preparing students to meet the North Carolina State Board of Education’s Guiding Mission “that every public school student will graduate from high school, globally competitive for work and postsecondary education and prepared for life in the 21st century.” The course is rigorous and relevant, is based on state and national content standards, and engages technology to teach today’s generation of students. Related business and industry partners have endorsed this course as one that helps to prepare students for high-skill, high-wage, and/or high-demand occupational opportunities. This curriculum framework guide was adapted from the course titled Marketing Principles produced by the MBA Research & Curriculum Center, which is a non-profit (501(c)3) consortium of state education departments.

In this course students develop an understanding of the processes involved from the creation to the consumption of products/services. Students develop an understanding and skills in the areas of distribution, marketing-information management, market planning, pricing, product/service management, promotion, and selling. Students develop an understanding of marketing functions applications and impact on business operations. Mathematics and social studies are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.
This course content will enhance the core academic areas of reading, writing, and mathematics. It includes materials and performance assessments that are aligned to the course content. Formative assessments provide continuous feedback to measure student learning throughout the course. A companion classroom assessment bank — aligned, valid, and reliable — is available and provides summative assessments for each essential standard.
We trust these significant efforts will guide North Carolina’s teachers in their mission to prepare globally competitive students for a successful, 21st-century life.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Many Marketing and Entrepreneurship Educators and business and industry leaders have given a great deal of time and energy to the development of the blueprint and content/teaching outline for this course. Without the collaboration of knowledgeable and committed professionals, it would not be possible to provide current curriculum materials necessary for effective instruction in Marketing and Entrepreneurship Education program. The continual advancement of technology and constant changes in the technology industry make collaboration an essential part of the process of preparing young people to become competent members of the workforce.

The following teachers participated in and collaborated during the Piloting of this course:
Pilot Teachers

Candace Cashwell-Nash Central High School

Tony Davis-Sun Valley High School

Julie Fox-W.A. Hough High School

Claudia Jenkins-Southern Nash High School

Ruth Wilson-Philips-Charles D. Owen High School

Karen Raliski-Mount Tabor High School

Amy Singletary-North Henderson High School



Project Director

Delores P. Ali, Consultant, Marketing and Entrepreneurship Education




State Staff for Marketing and Entrepreneurship Education

Delores P. Ali, Consultant, Marketing and Entrepreneurship Education

Pam O’Brien-DECA State Adviser

Atkins “Trey” Michael-Curriculum Specialist, CTE

Carol Short-Curriculum Section Chief, CTE

Jo Anne Honeycutt-Director, CTE




Marketing and Entrepreneurship Education

Career and Technical Education

North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

6358 Mail Services Center, Raleigh, NC 27699-6358



Table of Contents

Marketing

Marketing Curriculum Guide Cover

State Board of Education (SBE) List

Disclaimer Statement

Foreword

Acknowledgements

Table of Contents

Course Description i

Adapted CTE Course Blueprint ii

Post-assessment Specifications vi

Equipment Lists and DPI Facilities Guidelines vii

Program Area Professional Learning Community (PLC) Moodle...………………viii

Formative Assessment.. ix

Internet Policy xi

Going Green: A Guide to Using CTE Curriculum for

Environment Sustainability xii

Overview of Career and Technical Student Organizations (CTSO) xiii

Overview of CTSO-Program Area Specific ivx

Integrating CTSO Competitive Events in Classroom Instruction xvi

MBA Research Curriculum Framework Guide is divided into six sections:

Introduction to Course

Course Philosophy and Goals

Course Descriptions and Learning Outcomes

Course Outline

Planning Guide Sheets

Using Project-Based Learning and Projects

Appendices





COURSE DESCRIPTION

6621 Marketing
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 30

Hours of Instruction: 135 (block) 150 (regular)

Prerequisite: None
In this course, students develop an understanding of the processes involved from the creation to the consumption of products/services. Students develop an understanding and skills in the areas of distribution, marketing-information management, market planning, pricing, product/service management, promotion, and selling. Students develop an understanding of marketing functions applications and impact on business operations. Mathematics and social studies are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.
The Marketing and Marketing Management courses can help prepare students for credentials:

Assessment of Skills and Knowledge (A*S*K) http://www.askinstitute.org/

Professional Certification http://www.nrffoundation.com




Career and Technical Education (CTE)

Adapted CTE Course Blueprint

of

Essential Standards and Indicators



Marketing and Entrepreneurship Education

6621 Marketing

Public Schools of North Carolina

State Board of Education  Department of Public Instruction

Academic Services and Instructional Support

Division of Career and Technical Education

Delores P. Ali, Project Director

Raleigh, North Carolina

Summer 2011, Version 2

Contact MarketingEducation@dpi.nc.gov for more information.




Pilot Teachers

Candace Cashwell-Nash Central High School

Tony Davis-Sun Valley High School

Julie Fox-W.A. Hough High School

Claudia Jenkins-Southern Nash High School

Ruth Wilson-Philips-Charles D. Owen High School

Karen Raliski-Mount Tabor High School

Amy Singletary-North Henderson High School



This Adapted CTE Course Blueprint has been reviewed by business and industry representatives for technical content and appropriateness for the industry.

Adapted CTE Course Blueprint of Essential Standards
Essential standards are big, powerful ideas that are necessary and essential for students to know to be successful in a course. Essential standards identify the appropriate verb and cognitive process intended for the student to accomplish. Essential standards provide value throughout a student’s career, in other courses, and translate to the next level of education or world of work.

The essential standards use Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy (RBT) category verbs (remember, understand, apply, analyze, evaluate, create) that reflect the overall intended cognitive outcome of the indicators. Each essential standard and indicator reflects the intended level of learning through two dimensions; The Knowledge Dimension is represented with letters A-C, and the Cognitive Process Dimension by numbers 1-6.

This document will help teachers plan for curriculum delivery for the course, prepare daily lesson plans, and construct valid formative, benchmark, and summative assessments. Assessment for this course is written at the level of the ESSENTIAL STANDARD and assesses the intended outcome of the sum of its indicators. Curriculum provider is MBA Research & Curriculum Center.
For additional information about this blueprint, contact the Division of Career and Technical Education, North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, 6361 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, North Carolina 27699-6361.
Reference: Anderson, Lorin W. (Ed.), Krathwohl, David R. (Ed.), et al., A Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessing: A Revision of Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Addison Wesley Longman, Inc., New York, 2001.
Interpretation of Columns on the NCDPI Adapted CTE Course Blueprint

No.

1

2

3

4

Heading

Essential Std #

Unit Titles, Essential Standards, and Indicators

Course Weight

RBT

Designation



Column information

Unique course identifier and essential standard number.

Statements of unit titles, essential standards per unit, and specific indicators per essential standard. If applicable, includes % for each indicator.

In addition, included are the assessment references used by 3rd party MBA Research and Curriculum Center, The assessment references identify core or supplemental content.


Shows the relative importance of each unit and essential standard.

Course weight is used to help determine the percentage of total class time to be spent on each essential standard.



Classification of outcome behavior in essential standards and indicators in Dimensions according to the Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy.
Cognitive Process Dimension:

1 Remember

2 Understand

3 Apply


4 Analyze

5 Evaluate

6 Create
Knowledge Dimension:

A Factual Knowledge

B Conceptual Knowledge

C Procedural Knowledge



Career and Technical Education conducts all activities and procedures without regard to race, color, creed, national origin, gender, or disability. The responsibility to adhere to safety standards and best professional practices is the duty of the practitioners, teachers, students, and/or others who apply the contents of this document.

Career and Technical Student Organizations (CTSO) are an integral part of this curriculum. CTSOs are strategies used to teach course content, develop leadership, citizenship, responsibility, and proficiencies related to workplace needs.


Adapted CTE Course Blueprint Essential Standards for

6621 MARKETING

(Hours of instruction: 135-180)




Essential Std #

Units, Essential Standards, and Indicators

(The Learner will be able to:)


Course

Weight


RBT

Designation






Total Course Weight

100%




A

BUSINESS OF MARKETING, CAREERS IN MARKETING, FOUNDATION OF MARKET PLANNING, CUSTOMER RELATIONS, AND SELLING

40%




1.00

Understand marketing, career opportunities, market planning, and foundation of marketing-information management.

15%

B2




  1. Understand marketing’s role and functions in business to facilitate economic exchanges with customers. (MK:001), (MK:002)

  2. Understand career opportunities in marketing to make career decisions. (PD:024)

  3. Read to acquire meaning from written material and to apply the information to a task. (CO:057) (SUPPLEMENTAL)

  4. Employ marketing-information to develop a marketing plan. (MP:001), (MP:003)
  5. Acquire foundational knowledge of marketing-information management to understand its nature and scope. (IM:012), (IM:184)


  6. Write internal and external business correspondence to convey and obtain information effectively. (CO:133) (SUPPLEMENTAL)

4%
3%

0%
4%

4%
0%





2.00

Understand selling, customer relations and product management.

25%

B2




  1. Acquire a foundational knowledge of selling to understand its nature and scope. (SE:017), (SE:076)

  2. Foster positive relationships with customers to enhance company image. (CR:004), (CR:005), (CR:019), (CR:006) (SUPPLEMENTAL)

  3. Acquire a foundational knowledge of selling to understand its nature and scope. (SE:932)

  4. Foster positive relationships with customers to enhance company image. (CR:007) (SUPPLEMENTAL)

  5. Resolve conflicts with/for customers to encourage repeat business. (CR:009), (CR:010) (SUPPLEMENTAL)

  6. Apply quality assurances to enhance product/service offerings. (PM:019), (PM:020)

  7. Reinforce company’s image to exhibit the company’s brand promise. (CR:001), (CR:002)

  8. Acquire product knowledge to communicate product benefits and to ensure appropriateness of product for the customer. (SE:062), (SE:109)
  9. Understand sales processes and techniques to enhance customer relationships and to increase the likelihood of making sales. (SE:048)


  10. Employ sales processes and techniques to enhance customer relationships and to increase the likelihood of making sales. (SE:110), (SE: 111), (SE:114) (SUPPLEMENTAL)

  11. Process the sale to complete the exchange. (SE:116)

  12. Process the sale to complete the exchange. (SE:009), (SE:835) (SUPPLEMENTAL)

4%
0%
3%
0%
0%
4%

4%
4%


3%
0%
3%
0%








B

PRODUCT/SERVICE MANAGEMENT, PRICING, CHANNEL MANAGEMENT, PROMOTION, MARKETING-INFORMATION MANAGEMENT, AND SELLING

60%




3.00

Understand product/service management, pricing and channel management.

29%

B2




  1. Acquire a foundational knowledge of product/service management to understand its nature and scope. (PM:001), (PM:024), (PM:039), (PM:040)

  2. Apply quality assurances to enhance product/service offerings. (PM:017) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
  3. Employ product-mix strategies to meet customer expectations. (PM:003)


  4. Position products/services to acquire desired business image. (PM:042), (PM:021)

  5. Position company to acquire desired business image. (PM:206) (SUPPLEMENTAL)

  6. Develop a foundational knowledge of pricing to understand its role in marketing. (PI:001), (PI:015), (PI:016), (PI:017), (PI:002)

  7. Acquire a foundational knowledge of channel management to understand its role in marketing. (CM:001), (CM:002), (CM:003), (CM:004)

  8. Acquire a foundational knowledge of channel management to understand its role in marketing. (CM:005), (CM:006) (SUPPLEMENTAL)

  9. Write internal and external business correspondence to convey and obtain information effectively. (CO:039) (SUPPLEMENTAL)

7%

0%

3%


4%

0%
9%


6%
0%
0%




4.00

Understand promotion, marketing-information management, and selling

31%

B2




    1. Acquire a foundational knowledge of promotion to understand its nature and scope. (PR:001), (PR:002), (PR:003), (PR:099), (PR:100), (PR:101)

    2. Understand promotional channels used to communicate with targeted audiences. (PR:007)
    3. Understand promotional channels used to communicate with targeted audiences. (PR:247), (PR:089) (SUPPLEMENTAL)


    4. Understand promotional channels used to communicate with targeted audiences. (PR:249), (PR:250)

    5. Write internal and external business correspondence to convey and obtain information effectively. (CO:040) (SUPPLEMENTAL)

    6. Acquire foundational knowledge of marketing-information management to understand its nature and scope. (IM:001)

    7. Acquire foundational knowledge of marketing-information management to understand its nature and scope. (IM:025) (SUPPLEMENTAL)

    8. Acquire foundational knowledge of marketing-information management to understand its nature and scope (IM:183)

    9. Acquire foundational knowledge of marketing-information management to understand its nature and scope (IM:419) (SUPPLEMENTAL)

    10. Understand marketing-research activities to show command of their nature and scope. (IM:010), (IM:282) (SUPPLEMENTAL)

    11. Understand marketing-research design considerations to evaluate their appropriateness for the research problem/issue. (IM:284), (IM:281), (IM:285) (SUPPLEMENTAL)

    12. Understand data-collection methods to evaluate their appropriateness for the research problem/issue. (IM:289)

    13. Understand data-collection methods to evaluate their appropriateness for the research problem/issue. (IM:418), (IM:286)

    14. Acquire a foundational knowledge of selling to understand its nature and scope. (SE:828) (SUPPLEMENTAL)

    15. Acquire a foundational knowledge of selling to understand its nature and scope. (SE:106)

    16. Acquire a foundational knowledge of selling to understand its nature and scope. (SE:107), (SE:108) (SUPPLEMENTAL)


10%
3%
0%
3%
0%
3%
0%
3%
0%
0%
0%

3%
3%


0%
3%
0%







POST-ASSESSMENT SPECIFICATIONS

The post-assessment will be administered through the Elements Instructional Management System using a third party assessment provided by the MBA Research and Curriculum Center. The post-assessment will be a 100-item multiple choice test. The post-assessment will assess students’ knowledge and skills of the content at the essential standard level as specified on the adapted blueprint.

Background Information on Essential Standards

Essential standards are big, powerful ideas that are necessary and essential for students to know to be successful in a course. Essential standards identify the appropriate verb and cognitive process intended for the student to accomplish. Essential standards provide value throughout a student’s career, in other courses, and translate to the next level of education or world of work.

Assessment for courses developed using the adapted CTE course blueprint is written at the level of the essential standard using one RBT category verb (remember, understand, apply, analyze, evaluate) that reflects the intended outcome of the sum of its indicators. For example, the indicators copied from an industry credential for an essential standard may use an immeasurable verb or may use a verb that is misaligned with the true intent of the indicator. Those verbs would still be used, since they are derived from the credential, but the assessment items would not necessarily reflect the definition of that verb. However, NC CTE will review the items and ensure alignment cognitively at the essential standard level.



EQUIPMENT LIST, TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS, and FACILITIES GUIDELINES

Access the equipment list, technical requirements, and facilities guidelines using the following links:


Equipment list

http://ctpnc.org/cte/equipment/
Technical requirements

http://bit.ly/KwN1Lv
Facilities guidelines

http://www.schoolclearinghouse.org


Course Professional Learning Community (PLC) Moodle

Please join the Marketing and Entrepreneurship Education Moodle PLC by following these steps:

  1. Obtain the Enrollment Key supplied by your local CTE Director or Administrator or from the Program Area Consultant. Program Area Consultants may be reached by email at: MarketingEducation@dpi.nc.gov .




  1. Create a LearnNC account by going to this website: http://accounts.learnnc.org

  • Click on Create an Account (if you have used Moodle in the past, you can use your existing username and password).

  • You pick your own username and password.

  • Enter your email address so that your username and password can be emailed to you.




  1. Join the Moodle Class by going to Moodle's website: http://moodle.learnnc.org

  • Login using your username and password.

  • In the upper left corner, click on All Courses.

  • Click on DPI under the PLC tab.

  • Click on the course PLC key.
  • Enter the Enrollment Key supplied by your local CTE Director or Administrator or from the Program Area Consultant. The Program Area Consultant may be reached by email at: MarketingEducation@dpi.nc.gov


  • Click on Enroll me in this Course

Teachers are encouraged to share ideas and activities in the course PLC and to participate in the discussion forums provided for each essential standard.




FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT
Frequently Asked Questions

Formative Assessment and North Carolina’s Formative Assessment Learning Community’s Online Network (NC FALCON)



  1. What is formative assessment?

Formative assessment is a process used by teachers and students during instruction that provides feedback to adjust ongoing teaching and learning to improve intended instructional outcomes (CCSSO FAST SCASS, 2006).


  1. What is the primary purpose of the formative assessment process?

The primary purpose of the formative assessment process is to provide evidence that is used by teachers and students to inform instruction and learning during the teaching/learning process.


  1. How does formative assessment fit into North Carolina’s next generation assessment system?

North Carolina’s next generation, comprehensive, balanced assessment system includes formative assessment, interim/benchmark assessments, and summative assessments that are aligned to state standards. Formative assessment is an essential component of this system because it forms the foundation of teaching and learning. In contrast to summative assessment, formative assessment is more focused on collaboration in the classroom and identifying learning gaps that can be addressed before end-of-year assessments. Formative assessment should occur in the classroom more often than any other assessment.


  1. Are there “formative tests”?

The definition that North Carolina has adopted defines formative assessment as a process. With this in mind, there is no such thing as a “formative test.” Formative assessment is regarded as an ongoing process rather than a particular kind of test.


  1. What formative assessment strategies can be implemented during classroom instruction?

There are a number of formative assessment strategies that can be implemented during classroom instruction. These range from informal observations and conversations to purposefully planned instructionally embedded techniques designed to elicit evidence of student learning to inform and adjust instruction. See the Collecting and Documenting Evidence professional development module on North Carolina’s Formative Assessment Learning Community’s Online Network (NC FALCON) for additional information on formative assessment strategies.


  1. What resources are available to educators that will provide them with a basic understanding of formative assessment and illustrate the role it may play in a comprehensive, balanced assessment system?

The online professional development series modules located on NC FALCON are intended to serve as a primer for teachers wishing to learn more about how formative assessment can impact their instruction and help their students achieve targeted learning goals.


  1. What professional development modules are available to educators on NC FALCON?

There are currently five different formative assessment modules in the online professional development series located on NC FALCON. The following is a list and description of the modules:
  • Importance of Formative Assessment––An introduction to formative assessment and its role in North Carolina’s 21st century balanced assessment system.


  • Learning Targets and Criteria for Success––An exercise in writing clear learning targets and defining criteria for success to help students answer the question, Where am I going?

  • Collecting and Documenting Evidence––An exercise in collecting and documenting evidence of learning to help students answer the question, Where am I now?

  • Analyzing Evidence and Descriptive Feedback––An exercise in analyzing evidence and providing descriptive feedback to help students answer the question, How do I close the gap?

  • Administrator’s Role in Formative Assessment––An exploration of the administrator’s role in formative assessment, as outlined by the North Carolina Standards for School Executives, and its implementation in the school or district.




  1. How much time does it take to complete the modules?

The modules and the activities contained within each module have been created so that the series can be completed in approximately seven hours. Approximately forty-five minutes to one hour of computer time is needed for each module. The modules are self-paced; therefore, individual participants control the pace and location of their learning.


  1. Is it better to complete the modules individually or with a school or district learning team?

The modules have been designed so that they can be used by individual educators working independently or with a school or district learning team. The NCDPI recommends participants work collaboratively in learning teams. Working together, teachers may assist one another as they complete the modules and practice their formative assessment skills.

  1. Is CEU credit available for participants who complete any or all of the NC FALCON modules?


At the completion of each module, participants will be able to print a certificate of completion which includes a recommendation for renewal credit or continuing education units (CEUs). Final awarding of CEUs must be approved by the local education agency (LEA). The LEA determines the content area and the number of CEUs granted.


  1. How do educators access the modules on NC FALCON?

NC FALCON is located at http://center.ncsu.edu/falcon/. For more information about login and password access, please visit the website or contact your LEA/school test coordinator.


internet policy

Career and Technical Education curricula and 21st Century Skills require students to use many technologies, including the Internet. Each school should have an Internet use policy, and all students should sign the school Internet policy prior to beginning any class that uses such technologies. Students who violate the school’s Internet policy must be held accountable for his/her actions and face appropriate consequences deemed necessary by the school in accordance with the school’s policies.


Teachers must use extreme caution when assigning Internet activities to students. Teachers must preview sites, which can change daily, prior to ANY activity. If the teacher determines a website used in an activity is inappropriate, or students are not mature enough to behave properly and according to the school’s Internet policy, the teacher should make alternate arrangements for completing the activity.





Many of the Instructional Support Materials (ISMs) are developed to help students organize and use the unpacked content relative to the designated Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy (RBT) verb. These are designed to help students study and retain relevant information.

Ideally, each ISM would be duplicated and handed to students in class. Realistically, teachers may have to find alternative approaches for implementing the ISMs in the classroom.
Teachers may have to “show” what each ISM looks like and rely on students drawing each in either a journal or on paper that is accumulated in a notebook.
Consider these alternative approaches for using the Instructional Support Materials in the classroom:


  • Draw the ISM on the board.

  • Duplicate the ISM and hand out one per group and collect at the end of class for use in another. To add longevity, consider laminating or using sleeve protectors for each ISM.

  • Laminate and have students use dry-erase marker pens if they need to write on the ISM. An alternative would be to place the ISM in a sleeve protector and have the students use dry-erase marker pens.

  • Prepare a transparency of the ISM and show it on an overhead projector.

  • Display the file in electronic form (PowerPoint or Word) through a digital projector.

  • Display the file in electronic form on an interactive whiteboard.

  • Display the file in electronic form via a document camera and digital projector.

  • Deliver the file electronically via an internal network, Blackboard, Moodle, or secure website. This would provide added benefit to homebound and absent students needing to make up work.

Other helpful conservation hints…



  • Always use both sides of the paper!!

  • If a student needs to redo an assignment, whenever possible, have the student use a different color pen or pencil and work on the same paper.

We hope these ideas will help conserve paper and other valuable resources!




OVERVIEW OF CAREER AND TECHNICAL STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS (CTSO)

Introduction

Career and Technical Student Organizations provide the opportunity for students to connect to business and industry professionals and career options. Additionally, CTSOs motivate students to higher level academic achievement and build interpersonal and employability skills. CTSOs are co-curricular, meaning they complement the state curricula in the classroom and incorporate realistic educational experiences not available through classroom instruction alone. Teachers must coordinate with local CTE directors to enhance the delivery of state curricula through CTSO activities. Through this coordinated effort, teachers improve student achievement on state and national Career and Technical Education (CTE) accountability measures. The Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 allows CTE directors to fund certain CTSO activities as identified in the 2009 NC CTE Fiscal and Policy Guide.


What are CTSOs?

The three components of a quality Career and Technical Education program include classroom instruction, workforce readiness and on-the-job training, and Career and Technical Student Organizations. CTSOs have been a part of Career and Technical Education since the passage of the Smith-Hughes Act of 1917. CTSOs are found in middle and high schools and post-secondary institutions throughout the nation and around the world. It is important to realize that CTSOs are not just “clubs”, but instructional tools that work best when integrated into the curricula. CTSOs:



  • Support and enhance related school-based and work-based learning,

  • Provide students with skills and knowledge to succeed in the new global economy,

  • Provide career exploration and competence,

  • Provide students with the opportunity to experience competition related to classroom instruction,

  • Encourage students to experience community service projects, and

  • Provide and enhance the development of leadership skills in students.


Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 Defined

“The Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-270) is the vehicle through which federal support is distributed to states, local school districts, and postsecondary institutions to develop more fully the academic and technical skills of secondary and postsecondary students who elect to enroll in career and technical educations programs.” (Source: CTSO Guide to accessing Federal Perkins Funds, 2008)



What are the benefits of CTSOs?

  • Develop meaningful business partnerships

  • Develop school and community leaders

  • Enable students to achieve high academic and occupational standards


  • Enhance student self-esteem and self-confidence

  • Help students to integrate contextual and academic learning

  • Link school-based learning to the real world of work and family

  • Motivate youth to become better students and productive citizens





Mission Statement

The mission of NC DECA is to enhance the co-curricular education of students who have an interest in marketing, management, and entrepreneurship. DECA seeks to help students develop skills and competence for entrepreneurial, finance, hospitality, management, and marketing careers, build self-esteem, experience leadership, and participate in community service. DECA is committed to the advocacy and the growth of business and education partnerships.


What is NC DECA?

North Carolina DECA is the premiere student marketing association. NC DECA is a Career and Technical Student Organization that serves students who are either currently enrolled or have successfully completed at least one Marketing Education course. NC DECA is affiliated with the national organization, DECA, Inc. DECA chapters operate in over 4,000 high schools across the U.S., Puerto Rico, Guam and territories, Mexico, Germany and Canada, with over 180,000 members.




  • DECA programs are co-curricular, meaning programs complement nationally recognized curriculum standards in the classroom and incorporate real-world educational experiences not available through classroom instruction alone.
  • The high school division of DECA, Inc. is recognized and endorsed by all 50 State Departments of Education and the U.S. Department of Education.


  • The principles guiding DECA programs are curriculum related career skills, workplace experiences, community service and the development of business leadership capabilities.


DECA as an Integral Part of the Marketing Education Program

The three major components of a Marketing Education program include:



  • Marketing curriculum

  • Work-based learning experiences

  • DECA activities

DECA is co-curricular and its activities can be used as teaching tools or to reinforce skills. Integrating DECA into the Marketing Education curriculum can be achieved successfully in many ways for meaningful learning experiences.


DECA Student Membership Benefits

  • DECA supports students define college and career goals and emphasizes the relevance of academic studies.

  • DECA promotes free enterprise and entrepreneurship and connects the importance of lifelong learning with success.

  • DECA directly serves Marketing Education students.

  • DECA develops leadership skills by offering extensive training opportunities.

  • DECA offers state, national, and international recognition through competition in 38 occupational areas.

  • DECA, Inc. awards more than $250,000 in scholarships each year.

  • DECA’s student membership is a reflection of the nation’s student population.


DECA Benefits from Business and Industry Participation

  • A 60-member National Advisory Board provides financial resources and active personnel support.

  • Thousands of business leaders support local DECA chapters as employers, guest speakers, competitive event judges, and sponsors.
  • Business leaders serve on local advisory committees.


  • Business involvement aids local, state, and international members.

Competitive Events

DECA offers a comprehensive program of competitive events based on the occupational goals of its student membership and on the activities of chapters in high schools and postsecondary institutions. Competitive events offered by DECA Inc. are replicated at the state or provincial association level as well as at the chapter level.


Purposes of DECA Competitive Events

  • Contribute to the development of skills necessary for careers in marketing, management, and entrepreneurship

  • Evaluate student achievement of the skills through careful measurement devices (performance indicators)

  • Provide opportunities for student and team recognition

  • Provide constructive avenues for individual or team expression, initiative, and creativity

  • Motivate students to assume responsibility for self-improvement and self-discipline

  • Provide a vehicle for students to demonstrate (via performance indicators) their acquired skills through individual or team activities

  • Assist students in acquiring a realistic self-concept through individual or team activities

  • Help students participate in an environment of cooperation and competition

  • Provide visibility for the educational goals and objectives of Marketing Education


DECA Websites

The North Carolina DECA website: www.ncdeca.org

The National DECA website: www.deca.org
Links to Specific Resources

  • http://www.deca.org/membershipprocessing.html
    • This walks you through the online membership submission process and provides needed background information.


  • http://www.deca.org/pdf/FAQs.pdf

    • This provides answers to common registration questions.

  • http://www.deca.org/celisting.html

    • Complete, up-to-date event guidelines.

    • This includes a list of all of the competitive events and the guidelines for undertaking them.

    • Sample exams (Only 10 questions for a representative sample of the exam. The actual exams have 100 questions.)

    • Sample role-plays for each role-play event.

    • Abbreviated versions of winning written event manuals.

  • http://www.schoolbasedenterprises.org

    • Certification, best practices and help for school-based businesses to provide students real-world experience.

  • www.deca.org/q&a.html

    • Down-to-earth answers for down-to-earth questions.

  • http://www.deca.org/advcornerresources.html

  • http://www.deca.org/pdf/calendar.pdf

    • Click on a topic to go to that page of calendar material.

  • http://www.deca.org/pdf/DECAChapterManagement.pdf

    • Provides basic background information for most aspects of running a chapter.


INTEGRATING CTSO COMPETITIVE EVENTS

IN CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION
Co-curricular methodology of integrating curriculum and CTSO competitive events increases opportunities for student achievement. DECA, the CTSO for Marketing Education students, the comprehensive competitive events framework is aligned with the course adapted blueprint indicators and curriculum framework guide performance elements and performance indicators.

Teachers may facilitate competitive events with their students in the co-curricular classroom. For example, if a student is planning to compete in the Principles of Business Management and Administration (PBM) event, the teacher and student may want to become familiar with the guidelines, performance elements (adapted blueprint indicators), and performance indicators for the PBM event.

Competitive event guidelines and performance indicators (performance elements listed within selected event document), sample exams, and sample events are available at http://www.deca.org/competitions/highschool/ . A document titled Connecting DECA’s Competitive Events to Curriculum that entails the comprehensive competitive events framework and curricular structure is available at http://www.deca.org/_docs/college-career-ready-attachments/EventstoCurriculum.pdfs .




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