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1. Which characteristic indicates the genre of this passage?



A.

It is addressed to a group of undecided people.






B.

It attempts to convince the audience on a point of view.




C.

It uses vivid description and provides many details.






D.

It provides facts and research findings to inform readers.



A Fashion Hero

     The face of feminism has changed in unexpected places by unsuspecting heroes. Take Gabrielle Coco Chanel, for example. Her modernist philosophy redesigned the way the world viewed women. By transforming the way women dressed during the 20th century, Coco Chanel granted femininity back to women. Little did the world know that a girl raised in an orphanage would liberate women from common stereotypical uniforms.


     Gabrielle Chanel was born in France in 1883. She was first inspired to reinvent clothes because she could not afford the fashionable garments of her time. Chanel’s job as a seamstress in the orphanage had given her the skills that she needed to redefine clothes for women. She opened her first shop outside of Paris, France with her uncle’s partnership. The store featured pullover sweaters and sailor jackets for men and displayed eye-catching straight skirts. The shop did not survive the tough competition of Paris.

     After a series of jobs and failed ventures, Chanel’s second millinery shop became a success. French actresses began wearing Chanel’s glamorous hats and helped establish her reputation. Chanel’s first designer item, the little black dress, was a stunning feat. Later, Chanel won critical acclaim for women’s business suits which allowed females to look professional and glamorous at the same time. The fashion industry was taken by storm. Clothing originally designed for men—like business suits— had been revamped for women.


2. Which characteristic indicates that this passage is an example of expository writing?



A.

It informs readers about a certain topic.






B.

It narrates the story of Gabrielle Chanel's youth.






C.

It vividly describes clothes designed by Chanel.






D.

It convinces readers to follow their passion.


3. How can the reader tell what genre this is?



A.

It is about a specific time period in Gabrielle Chanel's life.






B.

It is written by someone other than the person it's about.






C.

It includes detail about the author's personal experiences.






D.

It shows the first person point of view using a descriptive style.


4. Which statement best describes a main difference between journals and diaries?


A.

A journal mostly contains secret thoughts and feelings.






B.

A diary mostly records a specific event or period of time.






C.

A diary is more formal and carefully written than a journal.






D.

A journal is more likely than a diary to be published.

Dear Editor,

The last issue of your magazine featured an article that intends to insult the readers’ intelligence. The article entitled “The Dangers of a Water Bottle” did not present any scientific studies and only participated in the fear-culture of our society. Your magazine should not risk its reputation by featuring such urban myths.

Only last week, my friends got e-mails with subject matters similar to the water bottle article. Needless to say, half of those friends trashed their water bottles to find that the scare was a hoax. I happened to read a scientific study by the local university. A group of students experimented on the water bottle theory and discovered that the risk of stroke was not a plausible side effect of drinking water from a plastic bottle. The study also cited previous research that dispels the myth.

I demand more validity and research in your part before publishing a “science-based” article in the future.

Sincerely,

Sayaka Petersen
5. How is this passage best classified?



A.

research






B.

narrative






C.

nonfiction






D.

autobiography


6. Which characteristic indicates the genre of this passage?


A.

It explains a scientific phenomenon that affects people.






B.

It attempts to convince the editor on a point of view.






C.

It emphasizes on the importance of research on water.






D.

It is addressed to the editor of a popular local magazine.


Mama's Garbanzo Curry
by A. Gautam


The beans are soaked for two days
Two days of drowning in her aluminum bowl
Makes them gentle, like my kid brother's hands
She drains the water in the sink
It disappears like her youth

Only leaving a sound of the stories

I can never see the drops
I am not tall enough soon enough
She turns on the stove and sets us at a distance
Safe from the boiling oil, the scattering fenugreek
We watch the turmeric powder jump into the pan
The onions mingle with the garlic and ginger
I imagine the dance of the beans as they enter
The thin layer of newly formed sauce
Mama sings a song as she chops tomatoes
Redder than the vermillion on her forehead
The song echoes in the kitchen from faraway
She sings till the garbanzo beans change colors
Everything turns into the shade of the curry powder
She sings till Daddy comes home with a suitcase
His skin is the color of cumin


7. How can the reader tell what genre this is?



A.

The text documents the facts of the narrator's childhood.






B.

The text's setting is historically significant to its meaning.




C.

The language of the text is intense and full of imagery.






D.

The subject matter of the text is universal and timeless.


As I Ponder'd in Silence
by Walt Whitman


As I ponder'd in silence,
Returning upon my poems, considering, lingering long,
A Phantom arose before me with distrustful aspect,
Terrible in beauty, age, and power,
The genius of poets of old lands,
As to me directing like flame its eyes,
With finger pointing to many immortal songs,
And menacing voice, What singest thou? it said,
Know'st thou not there is but one theme for ever-enduring bards?
And that is the theme of War, the fortune of battles,
The making of perfect soldiers.


Be it so, then I answer'd,
I too haughty Shade also sing war, and a longer and greater one
     than any,
Waged in my book with varying fortune, with flight, advance and
     retreat, victory deferr'd and wavering,
(Yet methinks certain, or as good as certain, at the last,) the field
     the world,
For life and death, for the Body and for the eternal Soul,

Lo, I too am come, chanting the chant of battles,

I above all promote brave soldiers.


8. The reader knows this is a poem because it



A.

has a pattern of rhyming words.






B.

is broken into lines and stanzas.






C.

highlights the dialogue with italics.






D.

starts each line with a capital letter.

August 20: Got a good start at 7:30 but the roads are awfully stony. Crops are poor. Everyone tells us they never get rain here when they need it.

August 21: Met a family of emigrants who have spent the last two months traveling in southwest Missouri. They do not like it at all down there. We passed another covered wagon stopped by the road, and those folks are on their way to Missouri. The whole country is just full of emigrants, going and coming.

August 29: Parts of Nebraska and Kansas are well enough but Missouri is simply glorious. The sky seems lower here, and it is the softest blue. It is a drowsy country that makes you feel wide awake and alive but somehow contented.


9. This passage is best described as



A.

fiction.






B.

poetry.






C.

an essay.






D.

a diary.






     At this second appearing to take the oath of the presidential office, there is less occasion for an extended address than there was at the first. Then, a statement, somewhat in detail, of a course to be pursued, seemed fitting and proper. Now, at the expiration of four years, during which public declarations have been constantly called forth on every point and phase of the great contest which still absorbs the attention, and engrosses the energies of the nation, little that is new could be presented. The progress of our arms, upon which all else chiefly depends, is as well known to the public as to myself; and it is, I trust, reasonably satisfactory and encouraging to all. With high hope for the future, no prediction in regard to it is ventured.

—Abraham Lincoln



10. What type of passage is this?



A.

fiction






B.

speech






C.

poem






D.

journal




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