Draft Imnaha Subbasin Summary November 30, 2001 Prepared for the Northwest Power Planning Council Subbasin Team Leader


Bull Trout Recovery Team (State, Federal, and Tribal)



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Bull Trout Recovery Team (State, Federal, and Tribal)

The Goal for recovery of bull trout in the Imnaha/Snake Recovery Unit is to increase population stability and likelihood of long-term persistence. Objectives to achieve this goal are as follows:
Objective 1: Current distribution of bull trout is maintained or expanded within their current range in the Imnaha/Snake recovery unit;

Objective 2: Stable or increasing trends in abundance of bull trout are maintained;

Objective 3: Suitable habitat conditions for all bull trout life history stages and strategies are restored and maintained;

Objective 4: Opportunities for genetic exchange between local populations are provided.



State of Oregon




Oregon Department of Forestry


The goal of the Oregon Department of Forestry is to protect, manage and promote a healthy forest environment, which will enhance Oregon’s livability and economy for today and tomorrow.

Oregon Department of Agriculture

Oregon Noxious Weeds Strategic Program

The primary goal of the noxious weeds program is to develop a heightened awareness among Oregon’s citizens, the legislature, local governments, tribal governments, conservation organizations and land managers of the impact of noxious weeds and the need for effective noxious weed management. To accomplish this goal, the following objectives and strategies are recommended:
Objective 1: Leadership and Organization

Strategy 1.1: Provide consistent statewide and local leadership and organization

Objective 2. Establish cooperative partnerships

Strategy 2.1: Develop and expand partnerships

Objective 3. Planning and Prioritizing

Strategy 3.1: Develop and maintain noxious weed lists and plans all levels


Objective 4. Education and Awareness

Strategy 4.1: Provide education and awareness


Objective 5. Integrated Weed Management (IWM)

Strategy 5.1: Continue to support and advocate the principles of IWM


Objective 6. Early Detection and Control of New Invaders

Strategy 6.1: Implement early detection and control


Objective 7. Noxious Weed Information System and Data Collection

Strategy 7.1: Upgrade Noxious Weed Information System


Objective 8. Monitoring and Evaluation

Strategy 8.1: Monitor noxious weed projects to evaluate effectiveness


Objective 9. Policy, Mandates, Law Compliance and Enforcement

Strategy 9.1: Use mandates, policy and law to encourage effective weed management


Objective 10. Funding and Resources

Strategy 10.1: Increase base level funding for state, county local, and federal noxious weed control programs to address priorities and to assist private land managers.

Strategy 10.2: Additional funding sources for weed control

Oregon Department of Environmental Quality

The primary goal of the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality is to Restore, maintain and enhance the quality of Oregon’s air, water and land.


Oregon Parks and Recreation Department


The primary goal of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department is to provide and protect outstanding natural, scenic, cultural, historic, and recreational sites for the enjoyment and education of present and future generations.

Oregon Division of State Lands


The Oregon Division of State Lands has two overriding goals. These are:

1. Manage and protect state trust lands for the maximum long-term benefit of the public schools, consistent with sound stewardship, conservation and business management principles.

2. Manage non-trust lands for the greatest benefit of all the people of the state.

Oregon State Police


The overriding goal of the Oregon State Police is to develop, promote and maintain protection of the people, property, and natural resources of the state.

Department of Land Conservation and Development


The Department of Land Conservation and Development goals are as follow:

  1. Establish a framework for all land use decisions and actions.

  2. Preserve and maintain all agricultural lands.

  3. Conserve forestlands in a manner consistent with sound management of soil, air, water, and fish and wildlife resources, and to provide for recreational opportunities and agriculture.

  4. Protect natural resources and conserve scenic and historic areas and open spaces.

  5. Maintain and improve the quality of the air, water, and land resources of the state.

  6. Protect life and property from natural disasters and hazards.



Oregon Water Resources Department


The Oregon Water Resources Department overriding goal is to serve the public by practicing and promoting wise long-term water management.

Oregon Revised Statute - ORS 496.012

Oregon Revised Statutes are laws passed by the legislative bodies (House and Senate) of Oregon, giving guidance to ODFW for management of fish and wildlife resources. ORS 496.012 refers specifically to wildlife, but fish are included as part of wildlife. The goals of these laws are designed to:

1. Maintain species of wildlife at optimum levels.

2. Ensure that the developed lands and waters of Oregon are managed to enhance the production and public enjoyment of wildlife.

3. Promote the utilization of wildlife that is orderly and equitable.

4. Provide public access to lands and waters of the state, and the wildlife resources thereon, that are developed and maintained.

5. Ensure that wildlife populations and public enjoyment of wildlife are regulated compatibly with primary uses of the lands and waters of the state.

6. Provide a provision of optimal recreational benefits.


Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife


ODFW’s vision is that “Oregon’s fish and wildlife are thriving in healthy habitats due to cooperative efforts and support by all Oregonians” (ODFW 2000). The vision for the Imnaha subbasin is to improve habitat health and function for the enhancement and productivity of wild spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead, native resident trout, and numerous wildlife species (ODFW 1990).

Oregon Wildlife Diversity Plan (1993)

The goal of the Oregon Wildlife Diversity Plan is to maintain Oregon’s wildlife diversity by protecting and enhancing populations and habitats of native non-game wildlife at self-sustaining levels throughout natural geographic ranges. To accomplish this goal, the Plan relies upon the following objectives and strategies:
Objective 1. Protect and enhance populations of all existing native non-game species at self-sustaining levels throughout their natural geographic ranges by supporting the maintenance, improvement or expansion of habitats and by conducting other conservation actions.

Strategy 1.1: Maintain existing funding sources and develop new sources of public, long-term funding required to conserve the wildlife diversity of Oregon.

Strategy 1.2: Identify and assist in the preservation, restoration and enhancement of habitats needed to maintain Oregon’s wildlife diversity and non-consumptive recreational opportunities.

Strategy 1.3: Monitor the status of non-game populations on a continuous basis as needed for appraising the need for management actions, the results of actions, and for evaluating habitat and other environmental changes.

Objective 2. Restore and maintain self-sustaining populations of non-game species extirpated from the state or regions within the state, consistent with habitat availability, public acceptance, and other uses of the lands and waters of the state.

Strategy 2.1: Identify, establish standards and implement management measures required for restoring threatened and endangered species, preventing sensitive species from having to be listed as threatened or endangered, and maintaining or enhancing other species requiring special attention.

Strategy 2.2: Reintroduce species or populations where they have been extirpated as may be feasible.

Objective 3. Provide recreational, educational, aesthetic, scientific, economic and cultural benefits derived from Oregon’s diversity of wildlife.

Strategy 3.1: Develop broad public awareness and understanding of the wildlife benefits and conservation needs in Oregon.

Strategy 3.2: Increase or enhance opportunities for the public to enjoy and learn about wildlife in their natural habitats.

Strategy 3.3: Seek outside opportunities, resources and authorities and cooperate with other agencies, private conservation organizations, scientific and educational institutions, industry and the general public in meeting Program Objectives.

Strategy 3.4: Maintain and enhance intra-agency coordination through dissemination of Program information, development of shared databases and coordination of activities that affect other Department divisions and programs; identify activities within other programs, which affect the Wildlife Diversity program, and develop mutual goals.

Objective 4. Address conflicts between non-game wildlife and people to minimize adverse economic, social, and biological impacts.

Strategy 4.1: Assist with non-game property damage and nuisance problems without compromising wildlife objectives, using education and self-help in place of landowner assistance wherever possible.

Strategy 4.2: Administer the Wildlife Rehabilitation Program.

Strategy 4.3: Administer the Scientific Taking Permits Program.

Strategy 4.4: Administer Wildlife Holding and other miscellaneous permits.

Strategy 4.5: Provide biological input to the Falconry Program for the establishment of raptor-capture regulations.

Strategy 4.6: Update the Wildlife Diversity Plan every five years.


Oregon Black Bear Management Plan (ODFW 1987)


The overriding goal of the Oregon Black Bear Management Plan is to protect and enhance black bear populations in Oregon to provide optimum recreational benefits to the public and to be compatible with habitat capability and primary land uses. To accomplish this goal, the plan relies upon the following objectives and strategies:
Objective 1. Determine black bear population characteristics.

Strategy 1.1: Implement or cooperate in research to learn more about black bear ecology in Oregon, develop accurate populations estimates and provide a measurement of population trend.


Objective 2. Determine black bear harvest levels.

Strategy 2.1: Obtain improved harvest information through use of combination report card/tooth envelope.

Strategy 2.2: Monitor black bear harvest and implement harvest restrictions if necessary.

Strategy 2.3: Develop an educational program to alert black bear hunters of the need for improved black bear population information.

Strategy 2.4: If necessary, initiate mandatory check of harvested black bear.
Objective 3. Continue current practice of allowing private and public landowners to take damage causing black bear without a permit.

Strategy 3.1: The Department will not seek any changes in current statutes.

Strategy 3.2: Continue to work with other agencies and private landowners in solving black bear depredation problems.

Strategy 3.3: Explore the possibility of using sport hunters for damage control.


Oregon’s Cougar Management Plan (ODFW 1993a)

The goals of Oregon’s Cougar Management Plan are to:


  1. Recognize the cougar as an important part of Oregon’s wildlife fauna, valued by many Oregonians.

  2. Maintain healthy cougar populations within the state into the future.

  3. Conduct a management program that maintains healthy populations of cougar and recognizes the desires of the public and the statutory obligations of the Department.

These goals will be accomplished through the following objectives and strategies:

Objective 1. Continue to gather information on which to base cougar management.

Strategy 1.1: Continue to authorize controlled cougar hunting seasons conducted in a manner that meets the statutory mandates to maintain the species and provide consumptive and non-consumptive recreational opportunities.

Strategy 1.2: Continue to study cougar population characteristics as well as the impact of hunting on cougar populations.

Strategy 1.3: Continue to update and apply population modeling to track the overall cougar population status.

Strategy 1.4: Continue mandatory check of all hunter-harvested cougar and evaluate the information collected on population characteristics for use in setting harvest seasons.

Strategy 1.5: Continue development of a tooth aging (cementum annuli) technique.

Objective 2. Continue to enforce cougar harvest regulations.

Strategy 2.1: Continue to work with OSP to monitor the level of illegal cougar hunting activity.

Strategy 2.2: Implement appropriate enforcement actions and make the necessary changes in regulations to reduce illegal cougar hunting.

Strategy 2.3: Continue to inspect taxidermist facilities and records to discourage and document the processing of cougar hides lacking Department seals.

Objective 3. Document and attempt to eliminate potential future human-cougar conflicts.

Strategy 3.1: Provide information to the public about cougar distribution, management needs, behavior, etc.

Strategy 3.2: Attempt to solve human-cougar conflicts by non-lethal methods.

Strategy 3.3: Consider additional hunting seasons or increased hunter numbers in areas where human-cougar conflicts develop.

Strategy 3.4: Manage for lower cougar population densities in areas of high human occupancy.
Objective 4. Manage cougar populations through controlled hunting seasons.

Strategy 4.1: Base regulation modifications on population trends, as annual fluctuations in the weather can greatly influence recreational cougar harvest.

Strategy 4.2: Continue to regulate cougar hunting through controlled permit seasons.

Objective 5. Continue to allow private and public landowners to take damage-causing cougar without a permit.

Strategy 5.1: No changes will be sought to existing damage control statutes.

Strategy 5.2: Continue to work with landowners to encourage reporting of potential damage before it occurs, with the goal of solving complaints by other than lethal means.

Strategy 5.3: Continue to emphasize that damage must occur before landowners or agents of the Department may remove an offending animal.

Strategy 5.4: Encourage improved livestock husbandry practices as a means of reducing cougar damage on domestic livestock.

Strategy 5.5: Continue to work with other agencies to solve cougar depredation problems.

Objective 6. Manage deer and elk populations to maintain the primary prey source for cougar.

Strategy 6.1: Work with landowners and public land managers to maintain satisfactory deer, elk and cougar habitat.

Strategy 6.2: Evaluate the effects of human activities and human disturbance on cougar.

Strategy 6.3: Take action to correct problems in areas where human access is detrimental to the welfare of cougar or their prey base.



Mule Deer Management Plan (ODFW 1990)

The goals of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Mule Deer Management Plan are:

  1. Increase deer numbers in units that are below management objectives and attempt to determine what factors are contributing to long term depressed mule deer populations.

  2. Maintain population levels where herds are at management objectives.

  3. Reduce populations in the areas where deer numbers exceed population management objectives.

Population objectives were set by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Commission action in 1982 and are to be considered maximums.

Objective 1. Set management objectives for buck ratio, population level/density and fawn:doe ratio benchmark for each hunt unit and adjust as necessary.

Strategy 1.1: Antlerless harvest will be used to reduce populations which exceed management objectives over a two or three year period or to address damage situations.

Strategy 1.2: Harvest tag numbers are adjusted to meet or exceed objectives within 2-3 bucks/100 does.

Strategy 1.3: Population trends will be measured with trend counts and harvest data and may include population modeling.

Strategy 1.4: Update Mule Deer Plan every five years.

Objective 2. Hunter opportunity will not be maintained at the expense of meeting population and buck ratio management objectives.

Oregon’s Elk Management Plan (ODFW 1992)

The primary goal of Oregon’s Elk Management Plan is to protect and enhance elk populations in Oregon to provide optimum recreational benefits to the public and to be compatible with habitat capability and primary land uses. This goal will be accomplished through the following objectives and strategies:
Objective 1. Maximize recruitment into elk populations and maintain bull ratios at Management Objective levels. Establish Management Objectives for population size in all herds, and maintain populations at or near those objectives.

Strategy 1.1: Maintain bull ratios at management objectives.

Strategy 1.2: Protect Oregon’s wild elk from diseases, genetic degradation, and increased poaching, which could result from transport and uncontrolled introduction of cervid species.

Strategy 1.3: Determine causes of calf elk mortality.

Strategy 1.4 Monitor elk populations for significant disease outbreaks, and take action when and were possible to alleviate the problem.

Strategy 1.5: Establish population models for aiding in herd or unit management decisions.

Strategy 1.6: Adequately inventory elk populations in all units with significant number of elk.

Objective 2. Coordinate with landowners to maintain, enhance and restore elk habitat.

Strategy 2.1: Ensure both adequate quantity and quality of forage to achieve elk population management objectives in each management unit.

Strategy 2.2: Ensure habitat conditions necessary to meet population management objectives are met on critical elk ranges.

Strategy 2.3: Minimize elk damage to private land where little or no natural winter range remains.

Strategy 2.4: Maintain public rangeland in a condition that will allow elk populations to meet and sustain management objectives in each unit.

Strategy 2.5: Reduce wildlife damage to private land.

Objective 3. Enhance consumptive and non-consumptive recreational uses of Oregon’s elk resource.

Strategy 3.1: Develop a policy that outlines direction for addressing the issues of tag allocation to private landowners and public access to private lands in exchange for compensation to private landowners.

Strategy 3.2 Increase bull age structure and reduce illegal kill of bulls while maintaining recreational opportunities.

Strategy 3.3 Adjust levels of hunter recreation in all units commensurate with management objectives.

Strategy 3.4 Identify, better publicize, and increase the number of elk viewing opportunities in Oregon.

Oregon’s Bighorn Sheep Management Plan (ODFW 1992)

The primary goal of Oregon’s Bighorn Sheep Management Plan is to restore bighorn sheep into as much suitable unoccupied habitat as possible. The following objectives and strategies have been developed to accomplish this goal:
Objective 1. Maintain geographical separation of California and Rocky Mountain subspecies.

Strategy 1.1: California bighorn will be used in all sites in central and southeast Oregon

Strategy 1.2: Coordinate transplant activities with adjacent states.

Strategy 1.3: Continue to use in-state sources of transplant stock while seeking transplant stock from out of state.

Strategy 1.4: Historic areas of bighorn sheep range containing suitable habitat will be identified and factors restricting reintroduction will be clearly explained for public review.

Objective 2. Maintain healthy bighorn sheep populations.

Strategy 2.1: Bighorn sheep will not be introduced into locations where they may be reasonably expected to come into contact with domestic or exotic sheep.

Strategy 2.2: Work with land management agencies and private individuals to minimize contact between established bighorn sheep herds and domestic or exotic sheep.


Strategy 2.3: Work with land management agencies to locate domestic sheep grazing allotments away from identified present and proposed bighorn sheep ranges.

Strategy 2.4: Maintain sufficient herd observations to ensure timely detection of disease and parasite problems.

Strategy 2.5: Promote and support aggressive research aimed at reducing bighorn vulnerability to diseases and parasites.

Strategy 2.6: Bighorn individuals that have known contact with domestic or exotic sheep will be captured, quarantined, and tested for disease. If capture is impossible, the bighorn will be destroyed before it has a chance to return to a herd and possibly transmit disease organisms to others in the herd.

Strategy 2.7: Bighorns of questionable health status will not be released in Oregon.
Objective 3. Improve bighorn sheep habitat as needed and as funding becomes available.

Strategy 3.1: Monitor range condition and use along with population characteristics.


Objective 4. Provide recreational ram harvest opportunities when bighorn sheep population levels reach 60 to 90 animals.

Strategy 4.1: To reduce possibility of black-market activity, all hunter-harvested horns will be permanently marked by the Department.

Strategy 4.2: Do not transplant bighorns on those areas where some reasonable amount of public access is not possible.

Strategy 4.3: Consider land purchase in order to put such land into public ownership.

Objective 5. Conduct annual herd composition, lamb production, summer lamb survival, habitat use and condition, and general herd health surveys.

Strategy 5.1: Maintain sufficient herd observations so as to ensure timely detection of disease and parasite problems. This will include mid- to late-summer, early winter, and later winter herd surveys.

Strategy 5.2: Initiate needed sampling and collections when problems are reported to verify the extent of the problem. Utilize the best veterinary assistance.

Strategy 5.3: Promote and support an aggressive research program aimed at reducing bighorn vulnerability to disease and parasites.

Strategy 5.4: Continue to test bighorns for presence of diseases of importance to both bighorn sheep and livestock.

Strategy 5.5: Monitor range condition and use along with population characteristics.

Strategy 5.6: Conduct population modeling of all herds.

Strategy 5.7: Determine herd carrying capacity after consultation with the land manager.

Strategy 5.8: Investigate lamb production and survival as an indication of a population at carrying capacity.


Oregon Migratory Game Bird Program Strategic Management Plan (ODFW 1993)

The primary goal of the Oregon Migratory Game Bird Program Strategic Management Plan is to protect and enhance populations and habitats of native migratory game birds and associated species at prescribed levels throughout natural geographic ranges in Oregon and the Pacific flyway to contribute to Oregon’s wildlife diversity and the uses of those resources. The following objectives and strategies are designed to accomplish this goal:

Objective 1. Integrate state, federal, and local programs to coordinate biological surveys, research, and habitat development to obtain improved population information and secure habitats for the benefit of migratory game birds and other associated species.

Strategy 1.1: Establish an Oregon Migratory Game Bird Committee to provide management recommendations on all facets of the migratory game bird program.

Strategy 1.2: Use population and management objectives identified in Pacific Flyway Management Plans and Programs.

Strategy 1.3: Develop a statewide migratory game bird habitat acquisition, development, and enhancement plan based on flyway management plans, ODFW Regional recommendations, and other state, federal, and local agency programs.

Strategy 1.4: Implement a statewide migratory game bird biological monitoring program, including banding, breeding, production, migration, and wintering area surveys based on population information needs of the flyway and state.

Strategy 1.5: Develop a statewide program for the collection of harvest statistics.

Strategy 1.6: Prepare a priority plan for research needs based on flyway management programs.

Strategy 1.7: Annually prepare and review work plans for wildlife areas that are consistent with policies and strategies of this plan.

Strategy 1.8: Develop a migratory game bird disease contingency plan to address responsibilities and procedure to be taken in the case of disease outbreaks in the state. It will also address policies concerning “park ducks”, captive-reared, and exotic game bird releases in Oregon.

Objective 2. Assist in the development and implementation of the migratory game bird management program through information exchange and training.

Strategy 2.1: Provide training for appropriate personnel on biological survey methodology, banding techniques, waterfowl identification, habitat development, disease problems, etc.


Objective 3. Provide recreational, aesthetic, educational, and cultural benefits from migratory game birds, other associated wildlife species, and their habitats.

Strategy 3.1: Provide migratory game bird harvest opportunity.

Strategy 3.2: Regulate harvest and other uses of migratory game birds at levels compatible with maintaining prescribed population levels.

Strategy 3.3: Eliminate impacts to endangered or threatened species.

Strategy 3.4: Reduce impacts to protected or sensitive species.

Strategy 3.5: Provide a variety of recreational opportunities and access, including viewing opportunities, throughout the state.

Strategy 3.6: Provide assistance in resolving migratory game bird damage complaints.

Strategy 3.7: Develop opportunities for private, public, tribal, and industry participation inmigratory game bird programs including, but not limited to, conservation, educational, and scientific activities.

Strategy 3.8: Disseminate information to interested parties through periodic program activity reports, media releases, hunter education training, and other appropriate means.

Objective 4. Seek sufficient funds to accomplish programs consistent with the objectives outlined in the plan and allocate funds to programs based on management priorities.

Strategy 4.1: Use funds obtained through the sale of waterfowl stamps and art to fund all aspects of the waterfowl management program as allowable under ORS 497.151.

Strategy 4.2: Develop annual priorities and seek funding through the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act.

Strategy 4.3: Solicit funds from “Partners in Wildlife” as appropriate.

Strategy 4.4: Seek funds from a variety of conservation groups such as Ducks Unlimited and the Oregon Duck Hunter’s Association.

Strategy 4.5: Solicit funds form the Access and Habitat Board as appropriate and based on criteria developed by the Board and the Fish and Wildlife Commission.

Strategy 4.6: Pursue funds from other new and traditional sources, such as corporate sponsors and private grants.


ODFW’s Fish Goals, Objectives and Strategies


ODFW uses plans that provide statewide direction for approaches to trout, steelhead, warmwater fish, coastal chinook, and coho salmon management to frame strategies subsequently proposed in basin-specific fish management plans. These plans contain broad guidelines and statewide directions. In the Blue Mountains Province, the trout, steelhead, and warmwater plans are pertinent.

Steelhead and Spring Chinook Salmon


Fish managers have agreed to the following fisheries goal and objectives through the U.S. v. Oregon, the NWPPC planning process and the Lower Snake River Compensation Program. The Imnaha River will be managed for production of wild anadromous fish. Increased production from the basin will be attained by protecting high quality habitat, by improving degraded habitat, and hatchery production through conventional broodstock programs. Goal: productive, healthy, and sustainable wild populations of anadromous spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, and resident trout populations and protected habitat for their continued viability. Species-specific goals and objectives for the Imnaha are below (USFWS 2001).

Objectives for Steelhead and Spring Chinook Salmon

Objective 1: Achieve NMFS delisting criteria for spawner numbers and productivity of Imnaha Basin spring chinook salmon by restoring and maintaining natural spawning populations.

Objective 2: Reduce the demographic risks associated with the low productivity and decline of native spring chinook salmon populations in Imnaha River.

Objective 3: Maintain artificial production programs for spring chinook salmon and steelhead, based on locally-adapted broodstocks, to mitigate for fish losses associated with construction and operation of lower Snake River dams.

Objective 4: Establish an annual supply of steelhead and spring chinook salmon brood fish capable of meeting annual production goals.

Objective 5: Maintain sport and tribal fisheries for steelhead and reestablish fisheries for spring chinook salmon, consistent with protection of endemic, naturally-produced stocks. Determine the number of summer steelhead and spring chinook salmon harvested annually and angler effort in recreational fisheries on the Imnaha River.

Objective 6: Identify, conserve, and monitor the life history characteristics of chinook salmon and resident and anadromous forms of Oncorhynchus mykiss in Northeast Oregon.

Objective 7: Maintain genetic diversity of indigenous, artificially-propagated summer steelhead and spring chinook salmon populations in the Imnaha River Basin.

Objective 8: Determine relative reproductive success of naturally-spawning hatchery and wild steelhead and chinook salmon in the Imnaha River Basin.

Objective 8: Minimize impacts of hatchery programs on resident and naturally produced spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead.

Objective 9: Modify facilities at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery to provide capability to implement Conventional Broodstock Program.

Objective 9: Determine optimum program operational criteria to ensure success of achieving objectives.

Objective 10: Assess utility of Conventional Broodstock Program for use in recovering salmonid populations.

Objective 11: Develop facilities and operations to improve safety and productivity of the hatchery environment.

Objective 12: Collect information to allow implementation of adaptive management process to evaluate management practices in the Imnaha Basin.



Strategies for Spring Chinook Salmon

Strategy 1. Use artificial propagation to enhance natural production and fisheries in the Imnaha Basin.

Action 1.1. Improve existing hatchery facilities and construct additional facilities to increase the effectiveness of programs conducted at these sites and their potential to achieve their goals.

Action 1.2. Provide for a regulated tribal and sport harvest of spring chinook salmon in the Imnaha River. Conduct creel surveys to estimate catch rates and record marks and collect coded wire tags to estimate catch and harvest of hatchery and wild salmon.

Action 1.3. Collect returning adult spring chinook salmon at weir Imnaha River.

Action 1.4. Monitor health of adult and juvenile spring chinook salmon, providing prophylactic treatments and treat for disease outbreaks, as necessary.

Action 1.5. Spawn fish using matrices to maximize genetic diversity of offspring.

Action 1.6. Rear juveniles, with segregation (where possible) by BKD status, to produce smolts similar to wild smolts.

Action 1.7. Acclimate juveniles at acclimation site on Imnaha River and release as smolts.

Action 1.8. Develop and maintain a database for Conventional Broodstock Program.

Action 1.9. Develop Annual Operations Plan for Conventional Broodstock Program.

Action 1.10. Evaluate programs at each life history stage: spawning, incubation and parr-smolt rearing, smolt release and adult returns.

Action 1.11. Coordinate ESA permit activities and participate in program planning and oversight.

Action 1.12. Summarize data and prepare and submit annual reports.

Strategy 2: Implement monitoring and evaluation to assess health, status and productivity of natural populations.

Action 2.1. Conduct spawning ground surveys of streams within the Imnaha River Basin. Count number of redds, live and dead adult salmon, examine carcasses for marks and collect coded wire tags, collect scales and determine age of maturity, prespawn mortality, spawner distribution and hatchery:wild ratio.

Action 2.2. Capture and enumerate returning adult fish at weir on Imnaha River. Mark all fish released above the weir for population estimate.

Action 2.3. Develop and maintain a database for spawning ground surveys.

Action 2.4. Monitor run size and develop run size estimate models based on previous years escapement, spawning ground information and other available data (e.g., smolt indices, dam passage counts) to make sound harvest allocation decisions.

Action 2.5. Evaluate ability to estimate escapement and straying and to characterize the spawning populations in the system.

Action 2.6. Determine progeny:parent ratios (productivity) based on spawner and recruit information.

Action 2.7. Estimate and compare smolt detection rates at mainstem Columbia and Snake River dams for spring chinook salmon migrants from the Imnaha subbasin.

Action 2.8. Document the annual migration patterns for spring chinook salmon juveniles from the Imnaha subbasin.

Strategy 3: Implement monitoring and evaluation to assess health, status and productivity of hatchery fish and effectiveness of hatcheries to accomplish objectives.

Action 3.1. Monitor and evaluate various experimental hatchery protocols (e.g., size at release, diet, exercise, rearing density, acclimated vs. direct release).

Action 3.2. Implement new treatments and prophylactic treatments for bacterial kidney disease under Investigational New Animal Drug protocols.

Action 3.3. Evaluate fish culture practices and fish handling for situations that may contribute to impaired fish health or exacerbate disease.

Action 3.4. Evaluate performance and life history characteristics of hatchery and wild fish in the wild, including smolt and adult migration characteristics, smolt-to-adult survival, age and size at maturity, run timing, progeny:parent ratio.

Action 3.5. Evaluate effectiveness of Conventional Broodstock Program to restore endemic stocks of spring chinook salmon in Imnaha River and maintain their genetic diversity. Examine various indices (e.g., egg-to-fry and fry-to-smolt survival, growth and health, fecundity, progeny:parent ratio) at specific life stages (incubation, fry-smolt rearing, post-smolt rearing and maturation) of all fish raised at hatcheries.

Action 3.6. Develop and maintain a database for Conventional Broodstock Program.


Strategies for Summer Steelhead

Strategy 1. Implement monitoring and evaluation to assess health, status and productivity of hatchery fish and effectiveness of hatcheries to accomplish objectives.

Action 1.1. Document fish cultural and hatchery operational practices at each Lower Snake River Compensation Plan facility.

Action 1.2. Develop rearing and release strategies that best achieve program objectives for hatchery-produced summer steelhead smolts using tag evaluation groups, monitor and evaluate indices of survival, growth, health, and productivity (Carmichael and Ruzycki 2000).

Action 1.3. Determine total production of summer steelhead adults, index annual smolt survival and adult returns to Lower Granite Dam for production groups, summarize fishery recovery and escapement information, and determine exploitation rates for each stock.

Action 1.4. Conduct creel surveys to estimate catch rates by interviewing anglers and collect coded-wire-tagged fish to estimate number of fish harvested.

Action 1.5. Using DNA typing methods, establish parentage of juvenile steelhead reared from areas above the Little Sheep collection weir and measure performance and life-history characteristics of hatchery fish in the wild. (Moran 1999).

Strategy 2. Implement monitoring and evaluation to assess health, status and productivity of natural populations.

Action 2.1. Determine genetic diversity, using DNA analysis, of natural steelhead stocks in the Imnaha River basin by sampling 5 representative tributary basins for four consecutive years.

Action 2.2. Monitor natural escapement and characterize spawning populations.

Action 2.3. Evaluate ability to estimate escapement and straying and ability to characterize spawning populations.

Action 2.4. Capture and enumerate returning adult fish at weirs on the Imnaha River and tributaries.

Action 2.5. Determine the relationship between anadromous and resident forms of O. mykiss in NE Oregon using otolith microchemistry analysis and known-parentage, hatchery crosses.

Action 2.6. Determine phenotypic plasticity of life-history traits among and between anadromous and resident O. mykiss by conducting controlled, breeding experiments between life-history forms and monitoring traits of their progeny.

Action 2.7. Monitor trend in spawner escapement in Imnaha basin streams by conducting annual spawning surveys in selected spawning areas.

Strategy 3. Use artificial propagation to enhance fisheries in the Imnaha Basin.

Action 3.1. Improve existing hatchery facilities, increase the effectiveness of programs conducted at these sites, and their potential to achieve their goals.

Action 3.2. Provide for a regulated tribal and sport harvest for steelhead in the Imnaha River.

Action 3.3. Collect returning adult steelhead at weir on Little Sheep Creek.

Action 3.4. Monitor health of adult and juvenile steelhead.

Action 3.5. Develop Annual Operations Plan for hatchery programs.

Action 3.6. Evaluate programs at each life history stage: spawning, incubation and parr-smolt rearing, smolt release, and adult returns.

Action 3.7. Coordinate ESA permit activities and participate in program planning and oversight.

Action 3.8. Summarize data and prepare and submit annual reports.

Oregon’s Trout Plan

The primary goal identified in Oregon’s Trout Plan is to Achieve and maintain optimum populations and production of trout to maximize benefits and to insure a wide diversity of opportunity for present and future citizens. To achieve this goal, the following objectives and strategies have been developed:

Objective 1. Maintain the genetic diversity and integrity of wild trout stocks throughout Oregon.

Strategy 1.1: Identify wild trout stocks in the state.

Strategy 1.2: Minimize the adverse effects of hatchery trout on biological characteristics, genetic fitness, and production of wild stocks .

Strategy 1.3: Establish priorities for the protection of stocks of wild trout in the state.

Strategy 1.4: Evaluate the effectiveness of trout management programs in providing the populations of wild trout necessary to meet the desires of the public.

Objective 2. Protect, restore and enhance trout habitat.

Strategy 2.1: Continue to strongly advocate habitat protection with land and water management agencies and private landowners.


Objective 3. Provide a diversity of trout angling opportunities.

Strategy 3.1: Determine the desires and needs of anglers.

Strategy 3.2: Use management alternatives for classifying wild trout waters to provide diverse fisheries.

Strategy 3.3: Conduct an inventory of public access presently available to trout waters in the state.


Objective 4. Determine the statewide management needs for hatchery trout.

Strategy 4.1: Summarize information on the current hatchery program and determine necessary changes.

Strategy 4.2: Increase the involvement of the STEP program in the enhancement of trout.

Strategy 4.3: Publicize Oregon's trout management program through the ODFW office of Information and Education.



Oregon’s Steelhead Plan

The first goal of Oregon’s Steelhead Plan is to sustain healthy and abundant wild populations of steelhead. The following objectives will be used to achieve this goal:

Objective 1. Protect and restore spawning and rearing habitat.

Objective 2. Provide safe migration corridors .

Objective 3. Protect wild populations of steelhead from overharvest.

Objective 4. Protect wild populations of steelhead from detrimental interactions with hatchery fish .

Objective 5. Monitor the status of wild steelhead populations so that long-term trends in populations can be determined.

The second goal of Oregon’s Steelhead Plan is to provide recreational, economic, cultural and aesthetic benefits from fishing and non-fishing uses of steelhead. The following objectives will be used to achieve this goal:
Objective 6. Provide for harvest by Treaty Tribes without overharvesting wild fish.

Objective 7. Provide recreational angling opportunities reflecting the desires of the public while minimizing impacts on wild fish.

Objective 8. Increase non-angling uses of steelhead that provide recreation.
The third goal of Oregon’s Steelhead Plan is to involve the public in steelhead management and coordinate ODFW actions with Tribes and other agencies. The following objectives will be used to achieve this goal:
Objective 9. Increase awareness of issues facing steelhead management and ODFW's management programs.

Objective 10. Provide a forum for public input on steelhead management.

Objective 11. Coordinate ODFW steelhead management activities with other habitat and fisheries managers.

Oregon’s Warmwater Game Fish Plan

The primary goal of Oregon’s Warmwater Game Fish Plan is to provide optimum recreational benefits to the people of Oregon by managing warmwater game fishes and their habitats. The following objective and strategies were developed by ODFW to achieve this goal:

Objective 1. Provide diversity of angling opportunity

Strategy 1.1: Identify the public's needs and expectation for angling opportunity.

Strategy 1.2: Choose management alternatives for individual waters of groups of waters, and incorporate the alternatives in management plans subject to periodic public review.

Strategy 1.3: Design management approaches to attain the chosen alternative.

Strategy 1.4: Constantly remind the public of the consequences of unlawful transfers of fishes in order to reduce the incidence of the introductions.

Strategy 1.5: Inform the public as to why ODFW chooses particular management strategies, in order to establish a positive perception of warmwater game fish.

Strategy 1.6: Use existing state and federal laws and regulations to deal with illegal introductions.


County and Local Government




Grande Ronde Model Watershed


The goals, objectives, and strategies listed below are accomplished through: coordination, education, technical assistance (project development, NEPA, ESA consultation), and funding assistance (primarily with Bonneville Power Administration funds).
Goals:

Provide habitat for the restoration and enhancement of anadromous salmonids and other native fish species.

Develop recommendations for management and utilization of water by agriculture and other industries.

Conduct a public involvement program to address concerns of landowners, land managers and resource users.

Provide recommendations for management of resources which will enhance the quality and quantity of stream flows.

Recommend resource management and research activities which meet the Program mission.

Promote the mission, goals and objectives of the Program to regional, state and national entities.

Assure that watershed restoration activities implemented in the Basin are adequately monitored and evaluated.

Protect the customs, culture, and economic stability of the citizens of the Basin, the Nez Perce Tribe and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and the citizens of the United States of America.

Objective 1. Coordinate program administration and watershed restoration activities.

Strategy 1.1. Facilitate inter-agency coordination of program activities and projects.

Strategy 1.2. Coordinate planning, prioritization, design and implementation of restoration projects.

Strategy 1.3. Provide technical support for project planning, design and implementation.

Strategy 1.4. Maintain basin-wide restoration activity database.

Strategy 1.5. Prepare watershed assessments/updates and NEPA documentation.

Strategy 1.6. Conduct educational outreach.

Strategy 1.7. Coordinate project effectiveness and basin-wide water quality monitoring.

Objective 2. Improve in-stream habitat diversity for salmonid spawning and rearing.

Strategy 2.1. Add large wood component to mainstem streams and tributaries.

Strategy 2.2. Rock and log structure placements.

Strategy 2.3. Install grade control structures.

Strategy 2.4. Reconstruct channel meanders.

Strategy 2.5. Construct off-channel rearing habitat.

Strategy 2.6. Implement riparian tree planting
Objective 3. Enhance riparian condition (vegetation, function, etc.)

Strategy 3.1. Construct riparian livestock fencing

Strategy 3.2. Restore wet meadows

Strategy 3.3. Develop off-stream livestock water sources

Strategy 3.4. Close/obliterate draw-bottom roads.

Strategy 3.5. Revegetate streambanks and riparian zones.


Objective 4. Reduce stream sedimentation and bank erosion.

Strategy 4.1. Revegetate streambanks.

Strategy 4.2. Construct rock barbs with embedded wood or use other structures as deemed appropriate to the site (e.g. J-hooks, W-weirs).

Strategy 4.3. Use bio-engineering where hard structures are not appropriate or possible.

Strategy 4.4. Determine the source of the problem (e.g. land use, changed hydrograph) and correct if possible.

Objective 5. Increase late-season streamflows.

Strategy 5.1. Improve water conveyance efficiency in irrigation ditches.

Strategy 5.2. Improve water application efficiency on irrigated lands.

Strategy 5.3. Acquire in-stream water rights.

Strategy 5.4 Lease water rights.

Objective 6. Improve upland watershed condition and function.

Strategy 6.1 Treat and contain noxious weeds.

Strategy 6.2. Construct livestock pasture fencing.

Strategy 6.3. Manipulate tree density.

Strategy 6.4. Enhance vegetative cover (seeding).
Objective 7. Improve adult and juvenile salmonid fish passage.

Strategy 7.1. Replace/modify inadequate culverts.

Strategy 7.2. Fix inadequate crossings (fords) by hardening the entrances and stream bottom or by replacing them with culverts or bridges (depending on use).

Strategy 7.3. Replace push-up gravel irrigation diversions.

Strategy 7.4. Modify impassable irrigation diversion structures.

Objective 8. Improve water quality.

Strategies: All tasks under Obj’s 3, 4, 5, 6.

Grande Ronde Water Quality Committee


Goal: To meet the necessary load allocations and achieve the water quality standards primarily by implementing management measures that will improve stream temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH.Protect the beneficial uses of the waters of the subbasin by implementing management measures to protect existing high quality waters and to improve water quality of impaired waters to the point that state water quality standards are met.
Objective 1. Eliminate point source discharges of nutrients during the summer.

Objective 2. Reduce NPS pollution contributions from transportation sources.

Strategy 2.1 Indentify and inventory road related problems, prioritize them and implement solutions including use of Oregon Department of Transportation Habitat Guide.

Objective 3. Reduce NPS pollution contributions form residential and commercial sources.

Strategy 3.1 Review and revise relevant city and county ordinances and implement management measures.


Objective 4. Reduce NPS pollution contributions from forest sources.

Strategy 4.1 Implement PACFISH Riparian Conservation Areas and Standards and Guides for Key Watersheds on Public Lands. Continue to implement forest practice regulations on private lands and review for practices for adequacy to meet standards.


Objective 5. Reduce non-point pollution contributions from agricultural sources.

Strategy 5.1 Implement the Agricultural Water Quality Management Area Plan and review it for adequacy to meet water quality standards.



Wallowa County


Goals:

  1. Wallowa County is part of the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (above) and supports their goals, objectives, and strategies as well as the goals, objectives, and strategies of the Wallowa SWCD.

  2. Provide quality habitat for native wildlife found in the county.

Strategy 1.1. Implement the Wallowa County/Nez Perce Tribe Salmon Habitat Recovery Plan with Multi-Species Strategy.



Wallowa Resources


Goal: To catalyze and facilitate community based stewardship in Wallowa County.
Objective 1. Promote community, forest and watershed health.
Objective 2. Create and maintain family-wage job and business opportunities.
Objective 3. Broaden understanding of the links between community well-being and ecosystem health.

Wallowa Soil and Water Conservation District

Goals:


  • Healthy economy and desirable quality of life in Wallowa County.

  • Productive and healthy watersheds in Wallowa County.

  • Habitat quality and quantity for sustainable populations of native and anadromous fish species and native wildlife.

Objective 1. Continue to assist landowners/cooperators in meeting local, state, and federal natural resource goals.

Strategy 1.1. Maintain well-qualified technical and planning staff.

Strategy 1.2 Maintain partnerships to fund program implementation.

Strategy 1.3 Participate with the NRCS and FSA in their programs (e.g. EQUIP, CREP, CRP) and serve on local action groups and basin work groups.

Strategy 1.4 Enhance and restore watersheds in conjunction with SB1010, the TMDL process, and implementation of the Wallowa County/Nez Perce Tribe Salmon Habitat Recovery Plan with Multi-Species Strategy.


Objective 2. Continue to promote efficient management and ranch planning for resource conservation and economic viability.

Strategy 2.1. Maintain well-qualified technical and planning staff.

Strategy 2.2 Maintain partnerships to fund program implementation.

Strategy 2.3 Promote Coordinated Resource Management Planning (CRMP).


Objective 3. Continue to address fish passage issues related to irrigation diversions.

Strategy 3.1. Design and install fish friendly diversion structures or infiltration galleries.

Strategy 3.2 Maintain partnerships to fund program implementation.

Objective 4. Continue to address irrigation tailwater returns.

Strategy 4.1. Design and install collection systems which return cleaner, cooler water to streams and rivers.

Strategy 4.2. Maintain partnerships to fund program implementation.

Objective 5. Continue to address water conservation and efficient use of irrigation water.

Strategy 5.1. Design and install pump stations, sprinkler systems and/or gated pipe systems where feasible and desirable.

Strategy 5.2. Maintain partnerships to fund program implementation.
Objective 6. Continue to address riparian ecosystem restoration and enhancement.

Strategy 6.1. Install practices which may include: juniper riprap, root wads, rock weirs (e.g. J-hooks, W-weirs, vortex weirs), rock barbs, or rock riprap, if appropriate, to reduce erosive water velocities on stream banks to levels which allow vegetative recruitment.

Strategy 6.2. Install riparian buffers to filter sediments and nutrients before they can reach the stream.

Strategy 6.3. Install riparian fence corridor projects (riparian pasture or exclusion) where desirable.

Strategy 6.4. Assist land managers with grazing and farm management planning.

Strategy 6.5. Control noxious weed populations in riparian areas.

Strategy 6.6. Maintain partnerships to fund program implementation.

Objective 7. Continue to address upland restoration and enhancement.

Strategy 7.1 Promote the development of off-stream watering systems for livestock (often in conjunction with riparian fencing projects).

Strategy 7.2. Assist land managers with grazing and farm management planning.

Strategy 7.3. Promote the reseeding of areas affected by natural processes (e.g. mass wasting, rain on snow, forest fires) to accelerate the regeneration of ground cover to minimize the potential for erosion and noxious weed invasions.

Strategy 7.4. Control noxious weeds on range and forest lands.

Strategy 7.5. Maintain partnerships to fund program implementation.

Objective 8. Continue to promote the implementation of the Wallowa County/Nez Perce Tribe Salmon Habitat Recovery Plan With Multi-Species Strategy.

Strategy 8.1. Take all project proposals to the Natural Advisory Committee’s Technical Committee for review.

Strategy 8.2 Assist the Natural Resource Advisory Committee in educating the county residents on what the County/Tribe Plan is and how to use it.

Strategy 8.3 Maintain partnerships to fund program implementation.

Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation Activities

A comprehensive research, m monitoring and evaluation program through the Lower Snake River Compensation Program has been underway in the Imnaha subbasin since 1984 (USFWS 2001).



Project Descriptions

Comparative Survival Rate Study of Hatchery PIT-Tagged Chinook Salmon (PSMFC, FPC, ODFW: BPA Project No. 8712702) - PIT-Tag Marking Spring and Summer Chinook Salmon at Lookingglass Hatchery

The Comparative Survival Study is a long term PIT tag study to develop smolt-to-adult survival indices for spring and summer stream type chinook originating above Lower Granite Dam to evaluate smolt migration mitigation measures and actions (such as flow augmentation, spill, and transportation) for the recovery of listed salmon stocks.

Lower Snake River Compensation Plan Steelhead and Chinook Salmon Evaluations (ODFW)

This research project meets the needs for evaluation of steelhead and chinook salmon hatchery production in the Imnaha River subbasin. The LSRCP was designed to establish and maintain artificial production programs for steelhead and chinook salmon to mitigate for fish losses associated with construction and operation of Lower Snake River Dams. A long-term evaluation and monitoring process is envisioned for the duration of operation of the hatcheries to develop and maintain fish runs, which meet recovery and compensation goals at minimum costs. ODFW is conducting an ongoing comprehensive evaluation of LSRCP activities in Oregon that address the following general guidelines:

1. Develop and evaluate operational procedures that will meet recovery and compensation goals as well as management objectives by priority.

2. Monitor operational practices to document hatchery production capabilities and challenges.

3. Monitor fish-rearing activities and results to document accomplishment of goals.

4. Coordinate research and management programs with hatchery capabilities.

5. Recommend hatchery production strategies that are consistent with endangered species recovery efforts.


  1. Develop knowledge and information to guide recovery actions and to monitor recovery in Imnaha river basin.

  2. Investigate characteristics of endemic stocks that may be influenced by hatchery production.

The RM&E program is designed to:



  1. Estimate annual adult returns and smolt-to-adult survival

  2. Evaluate the influence of various release strategies on survival and life history

  3. Evaluate natural and hatchery chinook smolt performance and survival within the subbasin and through the Snake River

  4. Compare life history and genetic characteristics of natural and hatchery fish

  5. Determine and compare progeny-to-parent ratios of natural and hatchery fish

  6. Determine success of restoring recreational fisheries

Other research, monitoring, and evaluation activities within the Imnaha subbasin that are used to compliment fish and wildlife projects are provided in Table 39.


Table 39. BPA-funded Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program research, monitoring, and evaluation activities within the Imnaha River subbasin (Bonneville Power Administration and Northwest Power Planning Council 1999)

Activity


Watershed Location

Agency

BPA #

Dates

Compilation of existing and potential sites for anadromous fish hatcheries

Basin-wide

USSBA

8405100

1984-1986

Standardization of fish health monitoring

Basin-wide

ODFW

8711800

1987-1991

Smolt monitoring

Imnaha River

PSMFC

8712700

1987-1998

Habitat study

Imnaha River

NPT

8801500

1987-1993

Hatchery site feasibility and conceptual design

Imnaha River

Montgomery Watson

8805300

1991-1997

Outplanting facilities plan


Imnaha River

NPT

8805301

1989-1999

Evaluation of re-establishment actions

Basin-wide

ODFW

8805304

1989-1999

NE OR artificial production study

Basin-wide

ODFW

8805305

1997-1999

Genetic evaluations of hatchery and natural fish populations

Camp Creek

NMFS

8909600

1989-1999

Genetic evaluations of hatchery and natural fish populations

Imnaha Pond Hatchery

NMFS

8909600

1989-1999

Genetic evaluations of hatchery and natural fish populations

Grouse Creek

NMFS

8909600

1989-1999


Genetic evaluations of hatchery and natural fish populations

Little Sheep Creek

NMFS

8909600

1989-1999

Genetic evaluations of hatchery and natural fish populations

Imnaha River

NMFS

8909600

1989-1999

Genetic evaluations of hatchery and natural fish populations

Lick Creek

NMFS

8909600

1989-1999

Evaluate supplementing summer steelhead

Little Sheep Creek

ODFW

8909700

1989, 1991-1993

Evaluate supplementing summer steelhead

Imnaha River

ODFW

8909700

1989, 1991-1993

Evaluate supplementing summer steelhead

Deer Creek

ODFW


8909700

1989, 1991-1993

Pit tagging wild chinook

Imnaha River

NMFS

9102800

1991-1999

Fish passage evaluation

Imnaha River

USACE

9204100

1992-1995

Fish passage evaluation

Imnaha River

USACE

9204101

1996

Genetics, population, and passage of natural fall chinook

Imnaha River

WDFW

9204600

1992-1996

Telemetry tracking

Basin-wide

USFS

9307000

1993-1996

Bull trout life history

Indian Creek

ODFW, OS Systems

9405400


1994-1997

Bull trout life history

Imnaha River

ODFW, OS Systems

9405400

1994-1997

Bull trout life history

McCully Creek

ODFW, OS Systems

9405400

1994-1997

Bull trout life history

Big Sheep Creek

ODFW, OS Systems

9405400

1994-1997

Audit Columbia basin anadromous hatcheries

Little Sheep Creek Pond

Montgomery Watson

9500200

1995

Audit Columbia basin anadromous hatcheries

Imnaha Pond Hatchery

Montgomery Watson

9500200

1995

Pit tagging hatchery chinook

Imnaha Pond Hatchery


ODFW

9602001

1996





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