Eight Grade Checklist First Six Weeks



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Eight Grade Checklist

First Six Weeks


At the completion of the First Six Weeks, the student will be able to:

_________ Complete a student information sheet.


_________ Complete diagnostic tests.
_________ Write a letter to himself or herself addressing goals for the upcoming year.
_________ Write a newspaper article.

_________ Read instructional and independent leveled text fluently, using reading strategies (decoding clues, vocabulary clues, inferencing, and metacognition strategies) to enhance and improve comprehension.


_________ Establish learning community norms and engage in discussions that are accountable to the learning and the community.
_________ Read and analyze thematically related text to answer overarching questions and develop enduring understanding about the importance of home.
_________ Write about, annotate, and compose personal narratives, poems, essays, or songs imitating the style of genres or authors by identifying significant moments; answering interpretive moments; answering interpretive questions with supporting text evidence; and analyzing texts.
_________ Acquire academic vocabulary and personal language from texts by analyzing word structure, context clues, coding texts, and wide reading.
_________ Engage in the writing process to develop narrative texts.
_________ Create and use visual scaffolds to record and organize information from texts; identify plot development; and analyze story elements.


8th Grade English Language Arts & Reading

First Six Weeks: Weeks 1-2 Theme: The Importance of Family

Time Frame: 10 Days Genre: Short Story (narrative), Essay, Song, Poetry

Writer: Jennifer Tippett


TEKS:

The student will read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. [ELAR 1]The student will understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing.

The student will use a flexible range of metacognition reading skills in both assigned and independent reading to understand an author’ s an author’s message.

The student will analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding.



Objective:


  • The students will be introduced to the campus’s procedures and teacher’s expectations for success in the class.

  • The students will complete a student information sheet and diagnostic tests.

  • The students will write a letter to themselves addressing goals for the upcoming year.

  • The student will write a newspaper article.

  • The students will read instructional and independent leveled text fluently, using reading strategies (decoding clues, vocabulary clues, inferencing, and metacognition strategies) to enhance and improve comprehension.

  • The students will establish learning community norms and engage in discussions that are accountable to the learning and the community.

  • The students will read and analyze thematically related text to answer overarching questions and develop enduring understanding about the importance of home.




Overview:
  • A syllabus should be provided to students which give general information about supplies needed, major pieces of literature and essays to complete, school policies, teacher expectations, grading practices, and contact information.


  • The student letter could address goals that are academic, social, family-related, skills-related, or personal in nature.

  • Although many excellent diagnostic tests exist, a TAKS type assessment is suggested to get an accurate evaluation of a student’s ability to pass the EXIT level TAKS test this year. In addition STAR assessment (Renaissance Learning) is suggested to get an ideal evaluation of student’s reading level to comprehend text within his or her reading range with at least 85% comprehension rate.

  • Develop metacognition strategies to enhance comprehension and fluency;

  • Develop students’ understanding of the writing process to produce effective pieces of personal writing;

  • Work within a literacy learning community and develop the habit of successful readers;

  • Develop an understanding of narrative, essay, song, poem and writing as a genre.


Literary Terms:


Character

Plot

Setting

Theme

Predict

Justify

Summarize

Compare/Contrast

Inferences

Linear Plot Development

Point of View

Setting

Rising Action

Resolution

Determine

Draw Conclusions


Autobiography













SAT Word of the Week (WOW):

adulation, alacrity






Essential Questions:
What are your goals this school year?

What are the writers saying in this text?

What do we learn about narratives, songs, poems, and essays?

How are fictional and real characters affected by their setting?



What do these texts say about the concept of family?


Suggested Lesson Ideas:

  • Suggestions for Establishing a Literacy Learning Community:

  • Diagnose fluency rates by administering individual fluency probes.

  • Lead students to set up their “Reader’s/Writer’s Notebook”

  • Plan activities such as paired reading and independent reading in an effort to improve fluency and automaticity.

  • Model reading strategies by reading aloud an AR book along with class.

  • Diagnostic Test:

  • A portion of a released TAKS Test (the literary selection with short answer; revising and editing selection). Explain your answer and support it with evidence from the selection.

  • Students complete STAR testing.

  • Enrichment: Close read, note-taking, and review of answers could be done after completion of the test as a class.
  • Intervention: One-on-one tutoring with students who earned very low scores


  • Independent Reading:

  • The results of the various reading pre-assessments (i.e. STAR, benchmarks, teacher-made) will help group students according to their reading needs and to choose appropriate reading materials.

  • Collect and make available to students a classroom library composed of culturally diverse magazines, fiction and nonfiction books. (See weblink for matching readers’ ability with text difficulty).

  • Allocate time for students to visit school library to check books in or out.

  • Establish the roles and routines for small group instruction and clear expectations and accountability for independent reading done in class and outside of class.

  • 20-minute time period per week in class for sustained silent reading (SSR) combined with a standing homework assignment to read for a half hour each night, keep a list of books read, and respond in a Reader’s-Writer’s notebook with three to five opportunities to write per week.

  • Reading Aloud:

  • Establish a routine of frequently beginning class with a read aloud or for students to read silently. Read for approximately 10 minutes and allow students to write a personal response to the text in their Reader’s/Writer’s notebook.

  • Establish clear expectations for the norms and skills of Accountable Talk during the Read Aloud time. Choose a few of the Accountable Talk stems (e.g., “This reminds me of… Can you tell me more about ____?”) to model and talk about initially with the whole class.

  • Listen to books on tape. Have students to use a graphic organizer during the listening and reading of the selection will give them a purpose for reading.

  • Teacher Note: Creating an Active Reading Model
  • There should be a before reading activity- sets the purpose, previews, or plans for what is about to read, during reading sets the purpose for reading and make connections. After school reading students pause and reflect, read, and to remember.


Before Reading:

  • Connect and Engage: Students can do QuickWrites and then share responses to the following question that relate to the unit’s theme: How can someone feel at home anywhere? What is the difference between a house and a home?

  • Create a T-chart that will allow you to pose student responses prior to reading and complete the T-chart after the completion of the unit.



Before Reading (continued):

  • Students make a personal connection to the theme, “The Importance of family,” by having theme suggest qualities that families might have in common, no matter where they are located.

  • Make a personal connection to the theme, “The Importance of Family.”

During Reading:

  • Reading to get the gist: Have students read literature selection for literal meaning, answering the following questions: What is the text about? How do you know? Either in small groups or as a whole class, student can read the text in sections, stopping to discuss the gist, make predictions, and clarify meaning. Students should document answers in the Reader’s/Writer’s notebook.

  • Reading to interpret text: Pose to students a text-specific interpretive question (open-ended question with multiple possible responses that can be supported with text evidence). Have students think of their responses, write their response in their Reader’s/Writer’s Notebooks, pair with another student, and share their responses.



Extensions:

- Students read aloud to a class one of his suggested selections.

- Students look in dictionary or thesaurus, or encyclopedia to identify synonyms and words that relate to the concept of home.

Gifted/Talented:

Divide students into two groups. Ask ine group to pick up the story, “The Elevator” at line 175 and write a scene of falling action and resolution in which Martin relizes that his freas were misplaced. Have the other group a more sinister and frightening ending. After both groups present their conclusions, let the class vote on the versions they prefer and explain why.


Intervention:

Tier 1 – Teachers model and review decoding and phonics lessons for reading groups.

- Provide specific prompts for previewing a text and have students respond orally or in writing.

Tier 2 – Teachers invite elective teacher to collaborate. Teacher may select a book to read aloud during the electives as a model for fluent reading.

- Stop students regularly to annotate and clarify their literal comprehension. Prompt their understanding by providing questions for each section that will help them monitor comprehension.

- one-on-one tutoring, peer tutoring

Tier 3 – Students attend before/after and Saturday school programs.


Suggested Assessment:

Reader’s/Writer’s Notebooks Teacher observations

Individual fluency probes Evidence of accountable talk

Fluency Rubric Checklist Completed T-Chart

One Minute Fluency Checks STAR Diagnostic Report

AR Testing


Tackling Test Tuesday Assessment (TTT)

Week 1: “A Knights Honor”

Week 2: “The Herald Sun/The Daily Times”

Resources:

Prentice Hall Literature Textbook

Prentice Hall Grammar Textbook

Student AR Goal Sheets

Ancillary Material

Teacher created material

Video: “A Cry in the Wild” (prequel to The River)

Technology

Websites: Renaissance Place (AR), http://www.tea.state.tx.us/readingproducts/products.html, http://www.tea.state.tx.us/reading/products/redbk4.pdf,


http://www.tea.state.tx.us/reading/products/redbk2a.pdf, www.lexile.com, www.allamericareads.org/pdf/single/during/thinkaloud1.pdf

6 Weeks Novel: The River


Literature Selections:


pp.25-27

Unit 1

Overview




pp.28-30




Plot & Conflict




pp.31-35




“The Elevator”

Analyzing Literature

pp.36




Analyze Visual




pp.38-49




“Raymond’s Run”

Plot & Conflict






8th Grade English Language Arts & Reading

First Six Weeks: Weeks 3-4 Theme: The Importance of Family

Time Frame: 9 Days Genre: Short Story (narrative), Essay, Song, Poetry

Writer: Jennifer Tippett


TEKS:

The student will read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. [ELAR 8.1]

The student will understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. [ELAR 8.2]

The student will understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from test to support their understanding.

The student will work productively with others in teams. [ELAR 8.28]


Objective:


  • The students will use elements of the writing process to compare texts;

  • The student will use metacognition reading skills to understand an author’s message.

Overview:

  • Write about, annotate, and compose personal narratives, poems, essays, or songs imitating the style of genres or authors by identifying significant moments; answering interpretive moments; answering interpretive questions with supporting text evidence; and analyzing texts.

  • Acquire academic vocabulary and personal language from texts by analyzing word structure, context clues, coding texts, and wide reading.


Literary Terms:


Draw Conclusions

Compare/Contrast

Inferences

Linear Plot Development

Point of View

Setting

Rising Action


Resolution

Determine

Foreshadowing







SAT Word of the Week (WOW):

astute, apathy







Essential Questions:
What are the writers saying in this text?

What do we learn about narratives, songs, poems, and essays?

How are fictional and real characters affected by their setting?

What do these texts say about the concept of family?




Suggested Lesson Ideas:

  • Best Practices for Vocabulary Instruction:

- Students set up their personal dictionaries and personal word list.

  • Pre-teaching Vocabulary : (introduce words that are keywords that are related to important concepts in the text prior to reading and useful)

- Repetition of words in variety of context

- Supporting words with visuals to scaffold learning

- Connect words to students’ lives

- Give student-friendly explanations and definitions


Sample Personal Dictionary Format


Vocabulary Word

What I Think It Means…

What It Actually Means


Illustration








































  • Strategies for Context Clues:

  • Look at examples

  • Create posters for each kind of clue and continue to contribute examples from the texts they read.

  • Listen to books on tape. Have students to use a graphic organizer during the listening and reading of the selection will give them a purpose for reading.

  • Strategies for Multiple Meaning Words:

  • Create a procedure chart to describe the process of looking up words and applying the relevant definition to the context.

Suggested Lesson Ideas (continued):
Procedure for Using Dictionary Definitions

  1. Look up the target word.

  2. Identify the part of speech of the target word.

  3. Match the definition to the context of the word and circle words in the context that support the definition.

  4. Reread the sentence in which the word appears using a paraphrase of the definition.

  5. Identify how understanding the meaning of the word clarifies the meaning of the text.



  • Knowledge of Word Parts (Roots, Prefixes, Suffixes):


  • Graphic Organizers

Before Reading:

  • Consider and discuss what the word short story means, brainstorm and list characteristics on a chart

  • Students create a section of their Personal Dictionary for literary terms.

  • Author Insider:

  • Engage students in a discussion about _________ by asking: Has anyone ever hear of him/her? Are you familiar with any of his books?

  • If students are not familiar with the author, give a synopsis of one book and personal information about the author.

During Reading:

  • Reading to get the gist: Have students read “___” for literal meaning, answering the following questions: What is the story about? What do you know about them? How do you know? Either in small groups or as a whole class, student can read the text in sections, stopping to discuss the gist, make predictions, and clarify meaning. Students should document answers in the Reader’s/Writer’s notebook.

  • As students read, they can record words that are unfamiliar or unclear to them.

  • In groups, students share their list and help each other figure out the meaning of the words by using context clues and using the dictionary.

  • Read aloud a section of the text and engage students in a discussion of the gist questions.
  • Reread for significance: Students reread parts of the story to identify 2-3 phrases or sentences from the text that are considered significant to the theme. (Think/Write-Pair-Share) In their Readers’/Writers’ Notebooks students record words from the text on the left side of a T-chart. On the right side, students write their explanation about the excerpts’ importance to the story. Students share their responses with a partner, and then the whole group.


  • Reread to analyze author’s technique: Lead students in a mini-lesson on foreshadowing. Have students identify author’s use of foreshadowing in text.




Extensions:

- Students create and play vocabulary games and create graphic displays to illustrate words in order to promote word consciousness

- Conduct dictionary drills where students work in partners or in groups to correctly identify the definition of a multiple meaning word that the teacher has displayed in a sentence on the overhead.

- Put students in groups to create and present vocabulary dialogue. Assign each group a prefix, suffix or root word to use and tell them how many words they need to use and tell them how many words then need to use in their dialogue that contain that word part. Students invent a conversation in which they use that word part.



Gifted/Talented: In the selection, “The Ransom of Red Chief,” irony is used by the author. Have students work in small groups to find examples of situational, dramatic, and verbal irony. Have them chare what they have found and make predictions on the ending of the story.
When reading “Clean Sweep” have advanced readers discuss the reader’s dependence on the first person narrator. As a character in the story, how might perspective change the outcome? Is this narrator a reliable, objective narrator?

Intervention:

Tier 1 – Teacher models finding meaning for words that were generated using affixes and roots. Students continue finding meaning to words on their web.

- Post word roots and affixes and their meanings in the room while students are engaging in these tasks.

Tier 2 – Motivate students to locate instances where words are used outside of the classroom and bring in examples to discuss in class.

Tier 3 – Students attend before/after school programs.

- To review the most common roots and prefixes, see link under Resources column.



Suggested Assessment:

Reader’s/Writer’s Notebooks Teacher observations

Evidence of accountable talk AR Testing

Completed T-Chart 6 Weeks Benchmark Assessment



Suggested Assessment (continued):

Novel test: The River



Tackling Test Tuesday Assessment (TTT)

Week 3: “Old Yeller”

Week 4: “Announcement” or “Never Ever Run”


Resources:

Prentice Hall Literature Textbook

Novel: The River

Ancillary Material

Teacher-selected Read Aloud

Dictionary, Thesaurus, Glossary

Student AR Reading Logs

Vocabulary Instruction for Intermediate English Language Learners

THINK/WRITE/SPEAK: Crafting Clarity in the Communication Applications Course

Graphic Organizers

Personal Dictionary entries

Video: “A Cry in the Wild” (prequel to The River)

Websites: Renaissance Place (AR), http://www.tea.state.tx.us/readingproducts/products.html, http://www.tea.state.tx.us/reading/products/redbk4.pdf,

http://www.tea.state.tx.us/reading/products/redbk2a.pdf, www.lexile.com, www.allamericareads.org/pdf/single/during/thinkaloud1.pdf

http://www.tea.state.tx.ud/reading/products/redbk5.pdf
Literature Selections:


pp.50-65

Unit 1

“The Ransom of Red Chief”


Conflict/Resolution, Predict, Make Inferences

pp.68-79




“Clean Sweep”

Conflicts, Subplots, Sequencing

pp.104-109




“Hoot”

SSR

pp.116-121




“My First Free Summer”

Introduction Non-Fiction, Cause/Effect

pp.27-28

3 Weeks Assessment Selection Test A







8th Grade English Language Arts & Reading

First Six Weeks: Weeks 5-6 Theme: The Importance of Family

Time Frame: 9 Days Genre: Short Story (narrative), Essay, Song, Poetry

Writer: Jennifer Tippett


TEKS:

The student will understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. [ELAR 8.6]

The student will use a flexible range of metacognition reading skills in both assigned and independent reading to understand an author’ s an author’s message. [ELAR 8.10]

The student will be able to understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. [ELAR 8.2]

The student will analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. [ELAR 8.10]

The student will work productively with others in teams. [ELAR 8.28]

The student will write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. [8.15]

The student will use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. [ELAR 8.14]



Objective:


  • The students will engage in the writing process to develop narrative texts.

  • The student will write about, annotate, and compose personal narratives, poems, essays, or songs imitating the style of genres or authors by identifying significant moments; answering interpretive questions with supporting textual evidence; and analyzing texts.

  • The student will read analyze thematically related texts to answer overarching questions and develop understanding about the importance of home.

  • The student will create and use visual scaffolds to record and organize information from texts; identify plot development; and analyze story elements.




Overview:

  • Engage in the writing process to develop narrative texts.

  • Develop metacognition strategies to enhance comprehension and fluency;

  • Develop students’ understanding of the writing process to produce effective pieces of personal writing;

  • Work within a literacy learning community and develop the habit of successful readers;

  • Develop an understanding of narrative, essay, song, poem and writing as a genre.



Literary Terms:


Theme

Predict

Analysis

Draw Conclusions

Irony

Mood

Science Fiction

Conflict (internal & external)


Tone

Fantasy

Suspense













SAT Word of the Week (WOW):

benevolent, concur






Essential Questions:
What are the writers saying in this text?

What do we learn about narratives, songs, poems, and essays?

How are fictional and real characters affected by their setting?

What do these texts say about the concept of family?




Suggested Lesson Ideas:

Before Reading

• Continuously connecting to the theme, point out to students that homes within a community are often similar to each other. Explain however similar in appearance, every home is different. Engage students in a conversation about why this is so. Next, ask student to visualize two households they are familiar. Have them answer the following questions. How are the homes similar? How are they different? How would you describe the people who live in them (i.e. their actions, thoughts, feelings).




Suggested Lesson Ideas (continued):

Model: The teacher will model this process by comparing his/her home to that of a famous home the students are familiar with (i.e. The White House/ The Obama’s). Explain to students that homes are somewhat analogous to short stories/narratives in that the location of the home is the (setting). The people who live there are the (characters) and the life they live is the story line. Most importantly, explain how what a person says, what a person does, how he interacts

with others, and how a person responds to challenges may create a picture that reveals his/her character traits. The teacher can choose any form of character map or graphic organizer to aid in this process. Once the teacher has completed this process, he/she will choose a character from their example to write a short character analysis paragraph about. The teacher should also model this process on the board or the over-head projector.

Criteria Chart: Because students will be required to create their own character analysis paragraph later, the teacher should have students discuss and analyze the teacher’s model by asking such questions as: o What makes this character analysis paragraph effective?

What are some of things you will do to ensure your character analysis paragraph is effective?


During Reading

Read to Get the Gist: Help students create a scaffold analyzing the main character in the selection “Golden Glass” by having them annotate for character traits, motivations, and relationships. Ask: Who are the characters? What do you know about them? How do you know? Assess student’s literal comprehension and press them to support their ideas, to clarify responses and to develop text understanding (What in the text caused you to say that? Could you show us where you found that?) Responses should be documented in their Reader’s/Writer’s notebook.


Reread for Significance: Students will identify (3) significant moments or ideas that are important to the changes the major character encounters . Have them record their ideas and explanations in a two column note taking format. Students can share with a partner explaining why their ideas are the most important in the story.


  • Reread to Interpret Text:
  • To deepen students’ understanding of characterization, have students choose a main character from the story “The River”, and have them complete a chart similar to the one on this page. After students have completed this chart, they will compose a character analysis paragraph like the one modeled by the teacher earlier in the lesson. A list of common character traits should be posted in the classroom. Students should also utilize the criteria chart that was developed earlier. Additionally, the teacher should have already prepared a rubric for this assignment. Rubrics communicate clear expectations. They can help students become more self-directed and reflective, and feel a greater sense of ownership for their learning. (see example rubric under assessment)





Character Analysis

Text Evidence

Character Trait Revealed

(said)







(did)







(thinks)







(looks)







(feels)







(responds to others)







(responds to challenges)










  • Pose to students a text-specific interpretive question (open-ended question with multiple possible responses that can be supported with text evidence). Have students think of their responses, write their response in their Reader’s/Writer’s Notebooks, pair with another student, and share their responses.

Reread to Analyze Authors Technique:
  • Explain to students that instead of Villanueva saying directly in the text that “Ted is afraid because his father left the family alone in the city,” she hints at the reason by having Ted remember his earlier fear. She lets the reader know he is afraid by emphasizing that he sleeps with weapons and then portrays him remembering the nightmares he had when his father left. Villanueva leaves it to the reader to make the direct link between effect and cause. Have students work in trios to find other instances in the story in which Villanueva suggest, but does not directly explain, why something happens. You may want to provide some hints: Why has Dad left? Why does Mom seem lonely? Why does Ted build a fort? Does living outside cheer Ted up? Have students create a graphic organizer to display their responses.





  • Discuss with students and chart their responses to the question what do writers do to make their narratives interesting to readers? Direct students to go back to one of the texts they have read in the unit and reread several parts that they felt were really interesting. Students can use these texts to generate more ideas about authors’ techniques to add to the chart How Writers Make Narratives Interesting to Readers. As students list techniques, press them to give quotes from the text as examples.


After Reading

  • Analyzing Literature: Students can reflect on the following two statements and decide which one they think is true:

  1. A story is mostly about what people do and say. It can happen at any place or time without changing the plot much at all.

  2. The time and place of a story is as important as the main character. If the main character was somewhere else, he or she would be someone else.

Students can divide themselves into groups according to the statement they selected and engage in debate with another group. Students can refer to literature they have read in the past. This debate should lead students to understand that some stories don’t depend on the setting, but in other stories, the location has a major role to play in the plot and has tremendous effects on the characters. Students can analyze through discussion and then writing which idea applies to “story title”. Students should remember to support their statements with evidence from the selection.


  • Discovery Writing and WriteLike

Give students a few minutes to draw a picture of their neighborhood, their home, or a room in their home and then share their drawing with a partner. After listening to their partner’s explanation of the drawing, each partner can reflect back to the speaker what details seemed to be the most important. Students then engage in discovery writing, using their drawing to help them write a brief narrative about their home (neighborhood, etc.). Remind students to use techniques from the chart How Writers Make Narratives Interesting to Readers. Students can share their responses with a group and have their group partners to identify the elements of narrative that were present (setting, character, plot) as well as the author’s techniques from the chart. After sharing, students can identify one place in their narrative where they can more deeply use one of the techniques from the chart. Students can place this writing in their portfolio and return to it in order to develop it more fully as they learn new techniques.

Teacher Notes: Writing to Learn— Responding to Literature

1. Providing opportunities for students to respond in writing allows them to think again about their reading, make personal connections with ideas, images and experiences, see ways to go beyond their own connections toward broader implications, and sometimes see critical distinctions between their own experiences and what they are reading.

2. The teacher should establish clear expectations for responding to text, such as explaining their reasoning and supporting with evidence from the text. Teachers will need to model for students how to respond with textual evidence. Teachers and students can develop the criteria for a good reader response by looking at and analyzing models.
Writing Focus

1. Portfolio: Students should maintain a portfolio throughout the year because it gives the student, teacher, and parents a clear picture of the student’s writing growth. Each six weeks there will be suggested core work products to be placed in the portfolio. Portfolios should be maintained in the classroom to ensure their availability.

2. Generating Writing Ideas: Students need opportunities to create reservoirs of ideas based on topics that are important in their own lives. Students can also review their reader response journals and look through family photos and memorabilia for writing ideas.


  • Culminating Project: Interview of a Neighbor: By conducting an interview with a neighbor and analyzing their notes, students will gain a deeper understanding of how characters in stories and in real life are impacted by their setting, and how to analyze characters in relation to the setting and to other characters.

1. Planning the Interview

• Guide students in selecting a person to interview who has lived for a long time in their neighborhood.

• Guide students to list outcomes for the interview such as:

Make connections between literature and life

Use details to make inferences and draw conclusions about characters/people

Use details to make inferences and draw conclusions about settings

Describe the important features of a setting

Understand how people and their stories are affected by location/setting

Organize information into a clear presentation of ideas

• Students can work alone or with partners to develop questions that will help them discover important characteristics of their neighbors, their neighborhood, and how people who live and work there are affected by that setting. Students might select three main ideas to focus on in their questions such as: Changes in the neighborhood over time, the effects of the geography of the neighborhood, and what people in the neighborhood have in common.

2. Conducting the Interview

• Students conduct the interview by asking their questions and taking notes on the person’s responses.

• After the interview, students can write a thank you note to the interviewee. This gives students the opportunity to practice letter writing formats and demonstrate appropriate formal language.
3. Analyzing the Interview

• Students can begin to analyze their findings from the interview by using a graphic organizer. They may want to identify categories of information such as, Information I already knew about my interviewee, Information I learned about my interviewee, Physical description of interviewee, physical description of neighborhood, etc. Students can list observations about a subject on the left side of a T-chart, and then inferences or conclusions that result from those observations on the right, or they may use some of the same scaffolds used before in analyzing characters and setting.


4. Presenting the Analysis

• Students can write their analysis in a composition or present their findings to a group or to the class using graphic organizers or presentation software such as PowerPoint or Inspiration.



  • Utilizing the information gained from the interview, have students create a narrative that expresses the thoughts, ideas and emotions about home from the perspective of the individual they’ve interviewed. Students should implement some of the various techniques utilized by the authors studied during the six weeks. Students can also refer to the criteria chart previously created on “How authors make narratives interesting”.




Extensions:
  • Students can bring in an artifact from their home or neighborhood that they consider to be a treasure. As students share their artifact, they can explain how it symbolizes something important about their home.





  • Students can review terminology and practice applying the categories of analysis by playing the 20 Questions Game with Characters. Write a list of characters on the board from selections students have read or movies they have seen. Using the 20 questions format, one student selects a character without revealing the name. Classmates ask questions to identify the character that can be answered Yes, No, or The text did not say. For example: Did the character change in the end? Did the character have good relationship with his/her family? Was he/she intellectual? Students can earn a reward as a class by identifying a specific number of characters within a time limit.




  • Students can write a sequel or an alternative ending to the original story without making drastic changes to other story elements such as setting.




  • Give students an expert from any narrative text and have them rewrite it using the author’s techniques utilized by Walter Dean Myers (colloquial language/slang)




  • Students can write a fictional narrative based on the interview they conducted with their neighbor. Students can discover first hand how authors often base their fiction on real people, events, and places.


Gifted/Talented:

As a review of prefixes, students can be grouped to write a paper or paragraph using words with as many prefixes as possible. The group that uses the most can be given a small prize or certificate.



Intervention:

Tier 1: (during core program/core instructional time)


  • Providing students the opportunity to talk with a partner before and after writing responses allows students to access and expand language and improve the quality of their responses.





  • When conducting their interview, students may need to work with a partner to help them scribe their notes, or record the interview to take notes at a more responsive pace. Some students may need to conduct the interview in another language and then translate the responses.




  • Students can bring in an artifact from their home or neighborhood that they consider to be a treasure. As students share their artifact, they can explain how it symbolizes something important about their home.

• Students can review terminology and practice applying the categories of analysis by playing the 20 Questions Game with Characters. Write a list of characters on the board from selections students have read or movies they have seen. Using the 20 questions format, one student selects a character without revealing the name. Classmates ask questions to identify the character that can be answered Yes, No, or The text did not say. For example: Did the character change in the end? Did the character have good relationship with his/her family? Was he/she intellectual? Students can earn a reward as a class by identifying a specific number of characters within a time limit.




  • Students can write a sequel or an alternative ending to the original story without making drastic changes to other story elements such as setting.




  • When conducting their interview, students may need to work with a partner to help them scribe their notes, or record the interview to take notes at a more responsive pace. Some students may need to conduct the interview in another language and then translate the responses.

Tier 2: (outside regular classroom/during school day)
  • Students may need a language scaffold to help them draw conclusions and make inferences from texts such as: It says, I say, and so. . . Students identify details or words from the text that need to be interpreted (it says), they identify reasoning and background knowledge that explain the text (I say), and then the conclusion or inference that results (and so).





  • Students may need prompts to help them analyze the information from their interview such as: identify causes and effects, recognize patterns, explain meaning, compare and contrast, connect, order, and classify.




  • Students can better understand different methods of characterization by color-coding the text. Photocopy the selections and have students highlight it in three different colors for each method. Use one color to show what a character does, a second color to indicate what a character thinks and feels; and a third color to highlight what others say about the character. If something in the selection remains unclear after reading and rereading any sentences or paragraphs, encourage them to ask for clarification.




  • The different types of information presented in the selections might confuse students with special needs. If so, photocopy the selections and highlight it in three different highlighter colors. Use one color to show what happens; a second color to indicate what a character thinks and feels; and a third color to highlight a character’s memories. If something in the selection remains unclear after reading and rereading any sentences or paragraphs, encourage them to ask for clarification.




  • Students may need prompts to help them analyze the information from their interview such as: identify causes and effects, recognize patterns, explain meaning, compare and contrast, connect, order, and classify.

Tier 3: (Establish before/ after school programs)



  • Content and attendance are determined by specific student needs and based on performance as indicated by data gathered via profiling.




  • Using independent-leveled text, the teacher may work with small groups to model how to use text evidence to discover character traits.




  • Some students may benefit from language frames to help them present their analysis. Example: I can tell that my neighbor is _____ (inference) because I noticed ____ (detail) and _____ (detail).




Suggested Assessment:

Picture of Home Teacher observations Evidence of accountable talk

Techniques Chart: How Writers Make Narratives Interesting to Readers

Letter about phobias and symptoms you feel

Class-generated criteria chart for analyzing characters

Character Analysis Paragraph

Reader’s/Writer’s Notebook (colloquial translations)

Criteria chart for the written analysis of the Neighborhood Interview.

Written analysis of Neighborhood Interview

AR Testing

Video Test: “A Cry in the Wild”

Suggested Assessment (continued):





Outstanding

Exceeds


Standards

Good

Response


Meets

Standards



Fair

Response


Almost

There


Weak

Response


Not yet

Topic/Idea

Development















Organization













Mechanics

and Usage















Presentation
















Score _______

Score _______

Score _______

Score _______


Tackling Test Tuesday Assessment (TTT)

Week 5: “The Hindenburg”

Week 6: “The Black Blizzards” and “Dust Bowl Days”


Resources:

Cause

Effect





Prentice Hall Literature Textbook

Prentice Hall Grammar Textbook

Required novels

Ancillary Material

Reader’s/Writer’s Notebook

Graphic Organizers/Posters (Character Traits, Cause-Effect)

Technology

Student AR Reading Logs

Websites: Renaissance Place (AR), http://www.tea.state.tx.us/readingproducts/products.html, http://www.tea.state.tx.us/reading/products/redbk4.pdf,

http://www.tea.state.tx.us/reading/products/redbk2a.pdf, www.lexile.com, www.allamericareads.org/pdf/single/during/thinkaloud1.pdf

http://www.tea.state.tx.ud/reading/products/redbk5.pdf, http://www.tea.state.tx.us/readingproducts/products.html, http://www.readwritethink.org/lesson_images/lesson390/character.pdf

Literature Selections:


pp.122-135

Unit 1

“The Great Rat Hunt”

Conflict, Chronological Order

pp.148-159




Writing Workshop

Personal Narratives

pp.136-147




“Paul Revere’s Ride”

Poetry, Drawing Conclusions, Paraphrasing

pp.605




“Future Tense”

Writing & Grammar Activities

pp.554




“Rain, Rain Go Away”




pp.160-165

Benchmark







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